The LoHud Yankees Blog

A New York Yankees blog by Chad Jennings and the staff of The Journal News


Pinch hitting: True Yankee Blog

Posted by: Peter Abraham - Posted in Misc on Jan 16, 2008 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

January is usually a slow month for baseball news. So we’ve lined up a series of guest bloggers to entertain you. Next up is Nick from True Yankee Blog.

Nick is originally from Manhattan and currently resides in West Bloomfield, Michigan. He has been blogging about the Yankees for eight months now. Nick is somewhat of a Moneyball-disciple and relies heavily on statistical analysis to back up his baseball opinions.

Here is his post, such as it is:

To me, the apparent changing of the guard in the New York Yankees front office over the past few months is extremely troubling. Full control has changed hands from General Manager Brian Cashman (a True Yankee favorite) to loudmouth owner Hank Steinbrenner. This is an appalling development in everyway and could very well lead to a Cash-less front office in ’09.

The Yankees are taking away final say from Cashman, clearly the best baseball mind in the organization. This is just completely insane. Since October 2005, when Cash got full control, the Yankees minor league system has leaped from one of the worst to one of the best (this has been well documented). The guys who deserve the credit for that complete turnaround are Cash and Vice President of Pro Scouting Damon Oppenheimer. They were very successful in the short time they had full control. What is the upside of ending their full reign prematurely in favor of a man without a baseball background?

In 2008, the last year of Cashman’s contract, Cash will have an entirely new role in the front office. His recommendations will definitely be heard, but as to how seriously they are considered by Hank is yet to be seen.

Yes, we know that Cashman drafted Phil Hughes, Joba Chamberlain and Ian Kennedy, but is he even going to be in the Boogie Down Bronx long enough to see their primes? There has been plenty of speculation as to how Cash is dealing with his sudden relaxation of power and the possibility of him leaving after ’08 is more than out there. Frankly, I can’t say I blame him. If I was Cash and I had to put up with an owner who tells anyone who will listen exactly what the organizations plans are, I’d have to consider leaving too. In the movie Rounders, Mike McD says to “throw your cards in the moment you know they can’t win, fold the hand.” I wouldn’t be at all shocked if Cash grows tired of Hank during the ’08 season, realizes he can’t beat him, and folds his cards for new ones in ’09.

On another subject, I’ve been getting some emails about why Don Mattingly doesn’t get more votes for the Hall Of Fame, here’s my take on that:

The main point that should be stated in the Mattingly case is that those who don’t support Donnie for the hall aren’t saying he wasn’t a great player. He was. In fact his peak WARP3 is above average for Hall Of Fame. 1B. But, his career WARP3 is well below average hall-of-fame 1B because he didn’t do it long enough thanks to a bad back (tough luck, still doesn’t get him in the Hall).

It’s not because he wasn’t amazing. Mattingly is the best fielding 1B ever not to appear on Seinfeld and he retired with a .300 EqA+. Those are great things, but the lack of longevity is what’s keeping him out.

Comments

comments

 

Advertisement

227 Responses to “Pinch hitting: True Yankee Blog”

  1. Geo Diego January 16th, 2008 at 12:20 am

    Nice Post. Though It’s not as powered as others were.

  2. Peter Abraham January 16th, 2008 at 12:23 am

    Thanks to Nick for being one of the guest bloggers. We’re on track to have one every day for the rest of the month.

  3. Geo Diego January 16th, 2008 at 12:24 am

    Why Donnie doesn’t get the votes is understandable in a way. Cashman leaving will happen unless Hank and co. let him do the job he loves. If Hank and co. want to control everything they can say Goodbye.

  4. ron January 16th, 2008 at 12:26 am

    Nice post. I think Cashman will stay though. The Yankee resources are such that it should be easy to maintain a strong farm system, even if Hank does occasionally trade away a top prospect or two over the next few seasons. It will be a lot harder for Cashman to succeed with a team that only spends 50 million on payroll, and he knows it.

    As for the HOF, I was always surprised that Ron Guidry never got more support in voting percentage. I don’t think he even cracked 10% in any single year.

  5. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Save the Three Musketeers! January 16th, 2008 at 12:27 am

    I was wondering why donnie wasn’t getting more votes, thanks for bringing it up!

  6. mel January 16th, 2008 at 12:28 am

    Great post. There are many Cashman detractors who think he’s overrated just like Jeter. But as is the case with Jeter, the Yankees wouldn’t be the same without him.

  7. Buddy Biancalana January 16th, 2008 at 12:28 am

    Nice post Nick. I have to agree about Cashman, though I like his negotiating stance by declining to discuss an extension at this point. After letting the big 3 perform for a full year in the big show, hopefully he will regain the full control he has earned throughout his tenure & add some big bucks to his bank account.

  8. Jack Ransovy January 16th, 2008 at 12:31 am

    To put it in two words Nice Post. Although I would expect and want more Bloggers to write about the young rotation, solutions in the bullpen and coming up Minors. Another subject people don’t bring are what the Yankees should and will do with Cano and Wang’s contracts. But… nice Blog.

  9. dan January 16th, 2008 at 12:35 am

    While Mattingly would not be in the upper-echelon of hall of famers, he would not be bringing down the bunch by any means. For what it’s worth, his B-Ref HOF Monitor is 133.5, with a likely HOFer at 100, and a “virtual cinch” at 130. While I don’t think Mattingly is a no-brainer, he absolutely deserves more respect than he deserves. I began watching baseball at the start of the Tino era (If I watched before I was too young to remember), so I don’t think I’m biased in terms of falling in love with his style of play or whatever. Being as objective as I can, I don’t think he’s gotten a fair shake.

  10. Geo Diego January 16th, 2008 at 12:40 am

    Jack I agree I want to hear more about the Young Rotation ( Where is IPK going to be put) bullpen (What Minors are coming up, How many innings will Joba pitch in the bullpen, How good is Albaladejo) and which Minors to expect during the year. On the Cano Wang contracts there’s not much to talk about either they will or they won’t there’s a reason both ways.

  11. HOF now January 16th, 2008 at 12:44 am

    Donnie Baseball was a great player the reason he’s not in yet is because… its really hard to understand. Go Cash.

  12. mel January 16th, 2008 at 12:45 am

    Yankee backlash. :(

  13. BP Help! January 16th, 2008 at 12:48 am

    Our BP today looks like Hawkins Albaladejo Farnsworth and WHO else?

  14. Whoever January 16th, 2008 at 12:53 am

    Nice Post. Donnie has a while maybe he’ll get in as a manager. Cashman deserves more say.

  15. Wotii Chang January 16th, 2008 at 12:58 am

    No writer talks about the for and against Cano and Wangs contracts. What price are they realistic to get? Cano and Wang have both said it they WANT LONG contracts. Shouldn’t some writers talk about it.

  16. Tim January 16th, 2008 at 1:02 am

    I thought the post concerning the Cashman situation was an over reaction without really knowing all of the facts. We as fans and bloggers don’t really know what is going inside the Yankee organization, all we know is what is being fed to the media. I agree that Hank is way too mouthy to the press but we don’t really know how this is affecting Cashman and his decision to stay on after this year or not. Hank has said many times that he values the Yankee prospects as much as anyone, that he was devastated when his father traded off some of the prospects during the 80′s and 90′s and that he is commited to making the team younger and making the farm system stronger. The biggest arguement between he and Cashman is whether or not to pull the trigger on a Santana trade, and since Santana is considered to be the best pitcher in the major leagues right now, at least the best lefty starter, why wouldn’t there be some difference of opinions? Come on, Hal has the right to have the opinion that adding Santana would be nice. Its his team and his money for crist sakes! But it is funny that he does say to some reporters that there is no way he is going to give Santana a 6 or 7 year deal, so if that’s true then what’s the big deal? Santana probably is going to want a huge 7+ year deal so it appears it doesn’t really matter what Hal wants in the end.

    As for Cashman drafting players, correct me if I’m wrong but Oppenheimer is in charge of the draft with I’m sure Cashman’s and Newman’s help and advice.

    And I’m sure in the end if Cashman leaves that the sun will come up tomorrow and the Yankees will still be a contender, and that they will hire a very capable GM. I for one, think that Cashman could use a break and it might be time for a new face in the GM’s role. He has made lots of terrible moves and trades, ie, Weaver and Farnsworth, just to name 2, but he has made some good ones and he did help initiate the new philosophy of building a strong farm system and getting better by developing your own talent by spending more in the draft and spending more for non-drafted free agents.

    And I don’t believe at this time that Cashman is going anywhere even if the Yankees trade Hughes and others for Santana. He understands that Santana is a once in a lifetime pitcher that could easily tip the balance in the AL to the Yankees.

    But if he doesn’t want to renew his contract at the end of the year more power to him and hopefully the new GM will at least work as hard as Cash has for the last few years, for the one thing that you can say, good or bad decisions, no one works harder than Brian Cashman.

  17. Hideki Balboni January 16th, 2008 at 1:10 am

    You are overrating Cashman’s value as GM. I agree that he deserves high marks for turning around the farm system, but his record on assembling the major league roster is spotty at best. He’s made a number of terrible signings, which have been well-documented on this site. And since 2004 he’s failed to put together an adequate pitching staff (starters and bullpen) despite a limitless payroll. That’s not good.

  18. Hideki Balboni January 16th, 2008 at 1:14 am

    If Kirby Puckett was elected to the Hall of Fame (on the first ballot!!), then Don Mattingly should be there too. Their career numbers are very similar, and Mattingly’s best years were signficantly more impressive than Puckett’s best.

  19. Tarvin January 16th, 2008 at 1:21 am

    Check this out:

    Pitcher A:

    Regular Season Career Stats
    165-87 W-L, 2324 IP, 2.93 K:BB ratio, 2.76 ERA, 131 ERA+, 1.11 WHIP, 3 “20+ win” seasons, finished in top 5 of Cy Young voting 4 times

    World Series Stats
    4-3 W-L, 57 IP, 0.95 ERA

    Pitcher B:

    Regular Season Career Stats
    170-91 W-L, 2392 IP, 2.81 K:BB ratio, 3.29 ERA, 119 ERA+, 1.18 WHIP, 3 “20+ win seasons”, finished in top 5 of Cy Young voting 4 times

    World Series Stats
    2-1 W-L, 32 IP, 1.69 ERA

    Pitcher A was a first-ballot hall of famer. Pitcher B peaked with 8.8% of the vote for HOF one year. He was off the ballot after dipping below 5% a couple of years after that.

    Now obviously Pitcher A is the superior pitcher. But Pitcher B has some similar numbers to that guy, albeit a little worse in most areas. I am not a fan of W-L record when judging pitchers, but you know the BBWAA love Wins and think it is the greatest stat ever when they vote for HOF. So I included it here to show that these two pitchers are also similar if you look at W-L record. Now how does one guy get 86.9% of the vote on his first shot while the other guy only gets 8.8% of the vote, and can’t even maintain the 5% minimum vote a couple of years later?

  20. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Save the Three Musketeers! January 16th, 2008 at 1:30 am

    Tarvin: Who are the pitchers?

  21. Tarvin January 16th, 2008 at 1:31 am

    Pitcher A is Sandy Koufax

    Pitcher B is Ron Guidry

  22. Janine NY January 16th, 2008 at 1:31 am

    i dont agree withe verything he says, but BL has a good post on the mitchell report

    http://bronx-bomberz.blogspot.com/

  23. Tarvin January 16th, 2008 at 1:32 am

    Of course I cherry-picked some stats to make Guidry look closer to Koufax than he actually is. But he’s still close enough where I think he desevred much more than 8.8% of the vote for HOF.

  24. Bob from NJ January 16th, 2008 at 1:36 am

    A couple things – the B-Ref HOF indicators (Black Ink, Grey Ink, etc.) are not meant to show who *should* get in the HOF but who is *likely* to get voted in, based on the history of the Hall. They should be taken with an enormous grain of salt.

    It is also not a valid argument to point out a guy in the HOF (like Kirby Puckett) and say that because player X (Mattingly) had a better career, he should be in. The BBWAA makes mistakes all the time, and will continue to do so in the future(Rice!). Potential candidates should not be judged against the BBWAA’s mistakes.

    Mattingly had a HOF caliber prime. But his career totals simply don’t stack up for a 1B, no matter how fine he was defensively. The spread, in terms of runs, between the best and worst fielding 1B is smaller than for any other position (except for pitchers, perhaps). By being a fine defensive 1B he did not save as many runs as a comparably excellent SS, CF, etc.

    His .307 career AVG looks nice, but his .358 career OBP is more telling. 222 career HRs is pretty terrible for a supposed HOF 1B. He had 4 excellent seasons, perhaps 3 very good seasons, and not much else after that. It’s a shame that his back gave out, but you can’t give a guy credit for what might have been. He was done as a full time player at the age of 34 (same as Rice, coincidentally). His HOF caliber peak does not outweigh his career shortcomings.

  25. Tommy January 16th, 2008 at 2:14 am

    Tarvin:

    Good points bout Gator.
    Not sure he’s HOF caliber, but no doubt he is often dismissed without consideration.
    In my opinion, he is the best (original) NYY SP since Whitey Ford.

    BTW– R–OP: what was the winning name for the 3 pitchers?

  26. Tarvin January 16th, 2008 at 2:22 am

    It’s a shame that Gator broke into the big leagues so late. His official rookie season was 1977, and he was 27 or 28 years old then. He just didn’t play long enough to wow the voters win Win totals or other related milestone numbers.

  27. Smadar January 16th, 2008 at 2:23 am

    I agree, Hank’s entertaining but he’s yet to prove that he knows a thing about baseball. If he had his way, Hughes and Kennedy would probably be looking to buy homes in Minnesota right now. I shudder to think what will happen if Cashman isn’t here to whisper in his ear.

  28. Fran January 16th, 2008 at 7:13 am

    I don’t think that Cashman will have a new role in 2008, but back to what it was pre 2005. Hank is acting just as his father did when Cashman first got the job. Cashman put up with it then and I think that he’ll put up with it for years to come. There are too many perks with being GM for the Yanks such as a huge amount of money to spend!

  29. Doreen January 16th, 2008 at 7:21 am

    Hey Nick -

    Thanks for the post. I think I’m just tired of talking about Brian Cashman. I am a Cash supporter. I’m not sure I’m with you on your take about his diminished role, preferring to believe it remains to be seen how the involvment of Hank/Hal affects Cashman’s ability to do his job. “Final say” may have been more important in a climate where the Tampa faction summarily dismissed Cashman’s, for lack of better words, input and vision. Unless a new group arises who will try to usurp Cashman’s authority, he is still the one with the final word before the final decision. And I am encouraged that there is dialogue with the Steinbrenners. If there was going to be a unilateralism here, I think a trade may have already been made for Santana. I say “may have” because there is not just one Steinbrenner, but two, and they have to agree with each other or one defer to the other. I don’t necessarily buy into Cashman have less influence.

  30. TurnTwo January 16th, 2008 at 7:42 am

    Tim: well said.

  31. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 7:42 am

    yeah, iv been really bummed about my warp3, too!

  32. murphydog January 16th, 2008 at 7:56 am

    Nice post, Nick. Here are my two cents:

    A top management change in most organizations will ruffle some feathers. Lower level employees not in the loop will gossip wildly at the watercooler, making ignorant, yet hard-as-cement pronouncements about who the biggest loser is. The Yankees are not much different from any other business in this regard except that the watercooler gossip club calls the media when they want to gripe. Things have changed. Cashman’s two big allies from his post 2005 season coup d’etat, Torre and Swindal, are out and Hank and Hal are in. And Cashman’s 2005 “I run baseball ops” deal with George was not in writing.

    But allow me to do a little watercooler analysis. Perhaps the real reason Cashman got control after 2005 was that the Boss’ health was obviously slipping and Cash was able to exploit that weakness. If Hank and Hal had been ready to step up in 2005, would Cashman have been able to consolidate power? Is the fact that Hank and Hal have stepped up a sign that they are not happy with Cashman’s reign? Or is it simply a matter of necessity owing to George’s alleged decline, a move that will require some sorting out of egos at the top?

    Allegedly, Cash doesn’t want Santana if it means giving up Hughes and that hasn’t happened yet. The conclusion to the Santana saga may be the litmus test for Cash.

  33. John in Ohio January 16th, 2008 at 8:11 am

    I like Cashman, a lot, but Stick Michael is the best baseball mind in the organization.

    Mattingly and Munson…it’s a shame that injury and tragedy keeps them out of the Hall of Fame. Great Yankees, great guys, great players. Both loved and respected by fans and, perhaps more importantly, teammates.

  34. Phil January 16th, 2008 at 8:14 am

    We don’t know if Hank is all bluster or not. We don’t know what you are assuming with regard to power within the Yankees. Pure speculation in the post.

  35. pat January 16th, 2008 at 8:19 am

    Justice no longer YES Studio Analyst

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01.....ref=sports

  36. Doreen January 16th, 2008 at 8:19 am

    murphydog

    They (Hank/Hal) have already offered Cashman an extension, so I take that as some indication that they are not displeased with the job he is doing. I also interpret some of Hank’s remarks regarding the way his disagreement with the way his father did some business (wiping out prospects from the system) and how that influenced his decision to step away from the baseball business years ago to mean that he is in tune with Cashman’s build from within philosophy.

    No, I think the ball is in Cashman’s court (regarding whether he stays with the Yankees or not), and whether he can be comfortable in this new arrangement. Which is why I take a wait-and-see approach. Cashman himself has outright stated that he has a 20-year relationship with the Steinbrenners and that it will take some time to sort things through, and he didn’t sound negative when he said it.

    We are not privy to the conversations/arguments that go on behind the scenes regarding Santana, so we really don’t know who thinks what and to what degree. So far, Santana is not a Yankee, so there must be a modicum of agreement that the Twins’ asking price is too high right now.

  37. randy l. January 16th, 2008 at 8:27 am

    “I think I’m just tired of talking about Brian Cashman. I am a Cash supporter.”
    doreen-
    i laughed when i read that because i’m tired about talking about brian cashman for the opposite reason. i’m not a supporter, but i don’t mind him being the gm if he bring’s his A game to the table. i don’t think he always does simply because he takes too much on and doesn’t seem to get everything done when it needs to be done. he needs to learn to delegate more. maybe out of fear of losing power he hasn’t hired the young assistant gms like antonetti at cleveland or josh byrne who was at boston before he left to be gm at arizona. you don’t see any yankee assistant gms leaving for gm jobs. that’s not a good sign.

    cashman has to have a good year this year. no bad spring start, no first round elimination, and no red sox world series. if the red sox nail a third one, he’s gone. if they get a third ,it would be too obvious they are doing something different at the gm level over there.

    my suggestion is the guest bloggers need to read what other guest bloggers are writing.

  38. Doreen January 16th, 2008 at 8:33 am

    Randy l -

    At least from the outside looking in, you may be correct, that Cashman has not delegated enough, and that might be a “hangover” from constantly fighting the Tampa people once upon a time. At what point will he be comfortable enough? Perhaps murphydog is right about Santana being a litmus test for Cashman in one respect – if the trade is not made including Phil Hughes on Cashman’s recommendation, perhaps he will then believe that his direction is the one the Yankees have chosen, and that will relax him a bit.

    Of course this is all just gibberish emanating from my fingertips, because what the heck do I know?? :lol:

  39. Doreen January 16th, 2008 at 8:35 am

    Randy l -

    Wasn’t the Dodgers’ Kim Ng once associated with the Yankees, or am I mistaken?

  40. Doreen January 16th, 2008 at 8:37 am

    Yes, she was. 1998-2001 she was Assistant GM.

  41. Bob from NJ January 16th, 2008 at 8:48 am

    And she’s reportedly very, very smart and an excellent candidate to become a GM in the near future.

  42. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 8:54 am

    “If Kirby Puckett was elected to the Hall of Fame (on the first ballot!!), then Don Mattingly should be there too. Their career numbers are very similar, and Mattingly’s best years were signficantly more impressive than Puckett’s best.”

    why do people keep making this inane argument?

    Kirby Puckett played CF. Don Mattingly played 1B.

    if you want to make a GOOD argument, replace Bernie Williams with Don Mattingly in the above argument.

    otherwise, it’s kindof embarrassing to keep overlooking this fundamental difference.

  43. TurnTwo January 16th, 2008 at 8:54 am

    randy, agreed. seems like a lot of the guest bloggers have basically taken the same point, and tried to spin it into a new direction.

    one thing I wouldnt mind reading about is some critical analysis of the Yankees radio/broadcasting team… good pts, bad pts, level of entertainment during games, maybe some comparisons to other broadcasting teams from other organizations around the league…

    if nothing else, it’d get us to talk about something new.

  44. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 9:01 am

    “Perhaps murphydog is right about Santana being a litmus test for Cashman in one respect – if the trade is not made including Phil Hughes on Cashman’s recommendation, perhaps he will then believe that his direction is the one the Yankees have chosen, and that will relax him a bit.”

    i’m not sure this is where things stand. i think the media has created this “Hank vs. Cashman” scenario with regards to Johan.

    i think Cashman WOULD (reluctantly) trade Hughes for Santana, if he was comfortable with the rest of the package. as long as the Twins keep asking for Kennedy too, it’s a very easy decision for him.

    i think that’s where things stand.

  45. jennifer- Hip Hip Jorge January 16th, 2008 at 9:12 am

    I read this on a another message board, apparently Jeter was on Best Damn Sports Show, and he said this.

    Before games the Yankees take a Saltine Challenge. It is 1 vs. 1 match where you try to eat more than 5 saltine crackers in one minute without drinking.

    Jeter we don’t need anyone dying before a game. :lol:

  46. randy l. January 16th, 2008 at 9:13 am

    doreen-
    kim ng left 6 years ago so that kind of illustrates what i’m talking about.

    bob from nj-
    you obviously have sabermetric leanings. that means you are interested in progressive management. what’s your impression of the overall managements of the yankees,indians,and red sox?

    my opinion is that the red sox and indians are ahead of the yankees in creating the new baseball front office. the yankees are lagging behind. ironically, i don’t think it’s sabermetrics that gives them the advantage, but the people who like sabermetrics are smart,educated, and know how to create deep organizations. the red sox and cleveland organizations seem to have an array of specialists that the yankees don’t have. like bill james with the red sox. like vince gennaro with cleveland. the red sox even have michael porter, the renowned competitive strategy expert from harvard on their payroll.

    what interesting person do the yankees have on their payroll?

  47. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 9:15 am

    “what interesting person do the yankees have on their payroll?”

    the yankees DO have a guy who does this work for them. i forget his name. Fishman?

  48. randy l. January 16th, 2008 at 9:17 am

    does anyone know where there is a transcript of the complete congressional hearings yesterday? i can’t seem to find them . maybe they are not available yet.

  49. TurnTwo January 16th, 2008 at 9:20 am

    hmmm, agreed (wow, i’m in an agreeable mood today).

    i do believe that the media has overhyped this Cashman vs Hank situation we’re dealing with currently, and speculation like this guest blog post here today seems to build right on top of the premise.

    i never suspected Cash would agree to Hughes and IPK, so I’ve never considered that request by the Twins legitimate…

  50. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 9:21 am

    in some respect, i agree with you randy that the yankees are lagging behind.

    but that doesn’t mean they aren’t on the right track. it just means they STARTED later.

    the Red Sox really started this direction in 2003. Cashman didn’t beging to completely re-shape the organization until 2005.

    in 1-2 years, they will have caught up.

    2008 is going to be a BIG year to watch the fruits of his labors.

  51. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 9:24 am

    i went on about jack buck and ernie harwell here a couple of days ago so i wont go into alot of detail, but they were both entertaining and very informative, paid great attention to the things you cant see on radio, like trail runners, etc. and though harwell had a few signatures, they both realized that the game was more important than they were.
    the yankees broadcasters are horrible. Sterling seems to spend the whole game looking for opportunities to show off his knowlege of show tunes and waiting to bore us with another “A Bomb” call. His attention to detail is very poor, its almost as if he assumes everyone is watching the game on tv with the sound turned down so they can listen to him. He drove me crazy years ago with that “islander goal, islander goal” crap and when i heard they were making him the yanks radio man, i hung my head.
    suzy is alot more informative, but her fawning over Sterling makes him much worse. also her voice is rather grating over time.
    ive always been a big fan of baseball on radio and i know its hard to do it well, but this is new york and the yankees fans deserve much better.

  52. Old Yanks Fan January 16th, 2008 at 9:26 am

    Perhaps the real reason Cashman got control after 2005 was that the Boss’ health was obviously slipping and Cash was able to exploit that weakness.
    —————————————————–
    This could be true, but then, as now, I just don’t think the Steinbrenners want to lose Cashman. What’s to say a replacement would do better? And GM’ing in NY, as doing anything in NY, is a different ballgame. Cashman has assumed the responsibility of putting a winner on the field every year, and has responded (I consider 11 1sts and 2 2nds to be a winner). Not, it’s not all his credit, nor is it all his blame. A bird in the hand….

    Also, Cashman has many responsibilities. Some are within his control, others are not. The things he can control are management issues, and he seems to excel at these. But good aquisitions/trades or not, no GM can guarantee how a player will perform. You play the best odds, take your bet shot, and sit back and see what happens.

    I am amazed that Weaver, Contreras, Vasquez and Pavano are thrown is Cashman’s face as failures. These players failed, but at the time, they were all solid deals.

    Weaver looked like a young stud when we had an old staff. The Sox were so anxious to get Contreras, they when we beat them to him, the Sox dubbed us ‘the Evil Empire’. Pavano has 2 better offers, including one from the Sox. Vasquez was young and had a good tract record.

    None of these guys were Pedro or Santana, but nobody thought they were. They were just solid choices to help build a solid pitching staff. That fact that all 4 bombed was bad luck… as were the midges.

    Dealing players is a competative environment. We know that .333 is a fantastic success rate for a batter. What should an excellent GM bat? .550? .650? .750? It is simply not realistic to expect even the best hitter to bat .400. What should we expect from Cashman?

    Who wudda thunk that those 4 pitchers would be duds while Chacon and Small were studs. I see 4 good decisions that had very bad luck, and 2 non-decisions (throwing sh*t against a wall) that got amazingly lucky. Somethings are just out of a GM’s control.

    I don’t think the Steinettes will be too bad, and fortunately Hank and Hal seems to have diverging viewpoints. I don’t think they want Cash to leave (as Doreen points out) and they certainly don’t want to take a change of letting Cashman go and subsequently having the team/organization do poorer.

    I think Cashman is just positioning himself for a minor power play. I mean, when you have been GM of a sereies of successful New York Yankees teams, where are ya gonna go?

  53. randy l. January 16th, 2008 at 9:27 am

    hmmm-
    i think fishman is part of the yankee statistical analysis department, but look at michael porter of the red sox for instance:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Porter
    the dude is an academic and corporate heavyweight outside of baseball. he ‘s just there on the red sox payroll a a consultant. i don’t see this kind of guy with the yankees. i think this kind of guy helps an organization because baseball is not just baseball anymore. it’s big business.

    i’m not sure how the gm fits in with a michael porter , but i’m sure theo and him at least have contact. there is an influence. it just seems that having this kind of guy like porter raises the organizational iq of the red sox. i’d like to see this sort of thing happen with the yankees.i’d like to see their organizational iq raised. i think they’ll have to do this to keep up with teams like cleveland and boston.

  54. jennifer- Hip Hip Jorge January 16th, 2008 at 9:29 am

    For being the greatest franchise in baseball we have pretty crappy broadcasters both on tv and the radio. Sterling always kills me it’s high it’s far it’s caught in shallow cf. Or the OH WHAT A PLAY, THAT IS THE GREATEST PLAY YOU WILL EVER SEE!!

    I enjoy when Paul O’niell is teh in the booth, he will rip Kay for incorrect calls. I always look forward to Kay’s vacations as few and far between they are.

  55. Doreen January 16th, 2008 at 9:29 am

    Randy l -

    I had just recalled her because I remember hearing her name when people were talking about who might be the next GM for the Dodgers. It HAS been a while since she left; I really wasn’t trying to challenge you – her name just popped into my head.

    hmmm,

    i’m not sure this is where things stand. i think the media has created this “Hank vs. Cashman” scenario with regards to Johan.

    i think Cashman WOULD (reluctantly) trade Hughes for Santana, if he was comfortable with the rest of the package. as long as the Twins keep asking for Kennedy too, it’s a very easy decision for him.

    i think that’s where things stand.

    I agree with you here, especially with regard to the Hank vs. Cashman scenario. I think you’re right about Cash reluctantly including Hughes; but if the deal is not done because of not wanting to include Hughes, you could say that could have something to do with Cashman’s desire to keep Hughes.

    And as I said before, what do I know? :)

  56. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 9:29 am

    one other thing about radio baseball, as bad as the yankees crew is, they stand head and shoulders above the abysmal red sox crew!

  57. Bob January 16th, 2008 at 9:31 am

    In my opinion, this issue with Cashman is way overblown. The Yanks haven’t actually done anything yet that would indicate Hank is not listening to Brian. It also takes a lot of pressure off of him to have Steinbrenner talking to reporters while he does his job. No one in their right mind would really believe that Cashman had total control for two years anyway. If George had wanted to, he would have interfered at any time; he just chose not to, give or take a few ultimatums here and there. In stark contrast to his father, Hank has stated that it is an unrealistic goal to win the World Series every year, and that sometimes patience waiting for a prospect to develop is prudent behavior. To date, the Yanks remain on course with the vision that Cashman has presented, to build from within and fill emergency gaps only with free agency. To be honest, the New York fans have been much worse than Hank in putting pressure on Cashman; every day, there is somebody screaming about why we haven’t traded for Santana yet, or waxing poetic about the necessity to sign Mark Teixera. My life’s philosophy has always been not to worry until something actually happens; up to now, no moves have been made that would indicate Cashman is not being listened to by his boss.

  58. Wotii Chang January 16th, 2008 at 9:32 am

    Just read a story of Joba’s first game against the Redsox at yankees stadium. The first ball speeds down the middle the batter doesn’t move the umpire yells strike. The second pitch is a curve it goes down the right corner the batter swings he misses Strike. The crowd starts yelling strike him out strike him out. The third ball is coming in fast the ball almost hits the batter the batter thinks it was intended to he doesn’t say a thing. The crowd goes Whoa and in comes the fourth pitch its down in the middle Strike yells the umpire and the batter walks away. Up stands tall Joba he pumps his fist and the redsox team gets up. That wasn’t called for they yell. This happens a few times during the game and every time the game goes on with the crowd yelling loud and clear what they want to see more of JOBA JOBA JOBA. Have a great day

  59. jennifer- Hip Hip Jorge January 16th, 2008 at 9:33 am

    Bernie that doesn’t say much. :lol:

  60. Josh January 16th, 2008 at 9:35 am

    as said already, i’d argue that cashman is far less than 5% responsible for the drafting kennedy, hughes and joba…yet he continues to get credited with this

    people say that cashman rebuilding the farm system (which shouldnt be used just to feed the roster but should be used for trades , but thats another point) is one of the best things he’s done, and since he’s hardly the most responsible for drafting them, that means one of the best things he’s done is not trade them, something that any of us could have done

    look, i’m not trying to hate on cashman, but he hasnt really done that much and gets credit for things he doesnt deserve

  61. whozat January 16th, 2008 at 9:39 am

    “i’m not sure how the gm fits in with a michael porter , but i’m sure theo and him at least have contact. there is an influence. it just seems that having this kind of guy like porter raises the organizational iq of the red sox.”

    So…you have no idea what this guy does, but the fact that he has impressive credentials makes you certain that he gives the Sox organization a competitive baseball advantage?

  62. Hideki Balboni January 16th, 2008 at 9:40 am

    “Kirby Puckett played CF. Don Mattingly played 1B.”

    I always laugh when people make this obvious observation and pretend it is a good counterargument. A player’s position should not be a limiting factor for HOF consideration when that player clearly establishes himself as one of the greatest defensive players of his generation. The notion that Don Mattingly’s HOF chances should be harmed somehow because he was only one of the greatest defensive first baseman in the game (rather than at another position) is just silly.

  63. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 9:41 am

    usa took a stab at rating announcers a few years ago. it read more like a popularity contest. of course vin scully came out as a god, i live in L.A. for 5 years and although i liked vin (how can you not like one of the nicest men in baseball) he is overrated. Mario Impemba did the angels games and was actually much better. here’s the link:
    http://www.usatoday.com/sports.....view_x.htm

  64. Old Yanks Fan January 16th, 2008 at 9:42 am

    one other thing about radio baseball, as bad as the yankees crew is, they stand head and shoulders above the abysmal red sox crew!
    ———————————————————–
    That’s true for radio, but the TV crew of Remy and Orsello is one of the best, if not the best. I mean, I am a die hard Yankees fan, but in watching Red Sox games (I live in N.E. and get NESN) over the years, these guys are not only excellent, but very fair to the Yankees and other teams.

    Remy will tease his own team and players more then the other team. These guys really go off on Manny. During a game they played a ‘Manny’s Greatest Hits’ segment, that were his biggest botches, including Manny disappearing into the Green Monster to use the bathroom, a number of botched fielding plays, and the ‘famous Damon cutoff catch’. As Remy narrated, Orsello is laughing so hard, that Remy has the truck play it again, the next inning.

    Remy is fair, bit not afraid to offer valid criticism. He does not get caught up in himself, and is generally the best I’ve seen in a long time. He is what I would call a ‘real baseball man’.

  65. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 9:44 am

    Sad to say, but, Mattingly compares favorably with Steve Garvey. I would put him in the HOF, either. Puckett got in on the sympathy vote…pure and simple. Had the selection been done two years later, he never would have made it, because of character issues.

  66. Jeff NJ January 16th, 2008 at 9:48 am

    Well I guess the guess blogger did his job and got some discussion going, however I don’t think the post is too interesting or accurate.

    First of the all, the world won’t end if Cashman leaves. They will find a suitable replacement just like they (hopefully) did with Joe Torre. That being said, I can’t imagine Cash would go anywhere else, he is going to get paid big time to stay on the job.

    As for Mattingly, I am the biggest Mattingly fan and I make the argument every year that Mattingly should be in the hall if only due to his comparison with Puckett. Granted ass omeone said Puckett played CF for much of his career and not mentioned he won (and was instrumental in winning) 2 world series. But then as Hmmm said, Bernie Williams should be in the Hall and all us Yankee lovers know the anti-Yankee bias will keep him out. Truth of the matter is, Kirby Puckett should not be in the hall, but if he is, then either Bernie or Donnie does.

  67. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 9:51 am

    Of the latest vintage TV tag teams in the booth, I’ll go with Jimmy Kaat and Bobby Murcer. They know the game and fill the dead time with some great stories, mostly about themselves. Almost always self-depreciating. Murcer got a lot of that from Mantle. One time, years ago, Mantle was on the air talking to Murcer and Rizzuto. Mantle told Murcer to tell him about his t-shirt…the one he wore under his uniform. Murcer came up in late ’65 and they noticed that he wore a 1961 t-shirt with pictures of Mantle and Maris. It was a little ratty, but, Murcer said it brought him luck.

  68. whozat January 16th, 2008 at 9:51 am

    “but the TV crew of Remy and Orsello is one of the best, if not the best.”

    I have to agree with this. They have so much fun up there in the booth, and Remy usually has interesting stuff to say about hitting and the players he knows personally. Though, I love Al Leiter in the YES booth. He just has so many insightful things to say wrt pitching. Kenny Singleton too, with hitting. Basically…I’d trade Kay for Orsillo in a flat minute.

  69. Buddy Biancalana January 16th, 2008 at 9:53 am

    Tony Kubek was an excellent announcer as well, haven’t heard his name mentioned in a while.

  70. whozat January 16th, 2008 at 9:54 am

    “But then as Hmmm said, Bernie Williams should be in the Hall and all us Yankee lovers know the anti-Yankee bias will keep him out.”

    Actually…I’m pretty sure the fact that Bernie wasn’t HOF caliber will keep him out. He was a very good player on some great teams, and his number should probably be retired…but that doesn’t mean he should be in the HOF.

    As for Donnie…well, there’s a different bar for amazing 1B numbers and amazing CF numbers. That’s just how it is.

  71. SJ44 January 16th, 2008 at 9:54 am

    Vince Gennero isn’t on the Indians payroll. He is paid on an as needed basis.

    He actually met with Cashman this off-season to discuss doing some work with the Yankees. He is a lifelong Yankee fan. I don’t know where that stands (as far as him doing work for the Yankees) at this time.

    The Yankees do have a couple of statistical analysis people on board now. Cashman hired them last season.

    I agree with Hmmm re: Cashman. Its pretty tough to have a complete evaluation of him since he only took over the full reins of the operation in 2005.

    From a player development standpoint, he has done an outstanding job re-shaping the focus of the organization since that time. The fruits of that labor are beginning to show at the ML level.

    His weakness has been making the right moves pitching-wise, at the ML level. Perhaps that’s why he is so gunshy about doing the Santana deal.

    As we have seen in the past, not many of these 100 dollar+ pitching deals seem to work out.

    At the ML level, I believe that until the Yankees are unburdened from the Giambi contract, its tough to make big moves.

    That’s a 22 million dollar weight around the Yankees necks.

    Looking back, that contract has done more damage to this organization, on many levels, than any deal done by the Yankees in the last 15 years. That one is on George. He bid against himself on that deal.

    Giambi’s contract, as well as Pavano’s complete washout as a Yankee, represent over 60 million bucks of wasted money. That’s a big hurdle to overcome in 2-3 years.

    The Hank vs. Cashman stuff is just media nonsense. If Hank was so egomanical, he would pull a “George” and just do the Santana deal. Even though the deal (in its present form) is heavily weighted against the Yankees.

    He says over and over that he, “listens to his baseball people”, yet folks choose to ignore what he says.

    As in any organization that has change at the top, you have to get used to the way the new bosses do business.

    The Steinbrenner’s have already offered Cashman a contract extension. If they were unhappy with his work, that wouldn’t be on the table.

  72. Buddy Biancalana January 16th, 2008 at 9:54 am

    I’d trade Kay for absolutely nothing in return, although he is better than Al Trautwig.

  73. "Fat Toad" Irabu January 16th, 2008 at 9:55 am

    Yankees fans should watch Kei Igawa this year. He bulked up from spending winter at Benihana’s. Got nice curveball.

  74. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 9:55 am

    “I always laugh when people make this obvious observation and pretend it is a good counterargument. A player’s position should not be a limiting factor for HOF consideration when that player clearly establishes himself as one of the greatest defensive players of his generation. ”

    and i always laugh at people who fail to grasp one of the most fundamental principals of player analysis.

    here is a list of players who have credentials that are equal to or better than Mattingly’s. unless you induct all of these players, i don’t see the case for Mattingly:

    Keith Hernandez
    John Olerud
    Will Clark
    Jim Thome
    Joe Torre
    Frank Thomas
    Fred McGriff

    honestly, i would LOVE to hear the case for Mattingly over Clark or Olerud. does anyone here think those guys are Hall of Famers?

    it’s this simple: if Mattingly played for the Royals, he’d have fallen off the ballot in his first year of eligibility.

  75. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 10:00 am

    im as big a bernie fan as anyone (is it obvious) but i dont see him as a hall of famer. has nothing to do with anti-yankees bias. Yankee’s hall of fame? absolutly…hold a Bernie Williams Day and retire #51?…absolutly! (do it THIS YEAR in THIS STADIUM!) But cooperstown? i think he’ll get alot of votes but i dont see it.

    another thing, everybody points to one or two guys in the hall at each position they think are weaker than the others and uses that to justify voting someone in with similar stats. This phenomanon (recent bloggers must have a fancy term for it) only weakens the Hall. I say compare a guy to the bulk of the players at that postition and see if he fits, not to the weakest guy. Then you keep the Hall for the truly deserving.

  76. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 10:02 am

    Bernie > Mattingly

  77. randy l. January 16th, 2008 at 10:02 am

    “So…you have no idea what this guy does, but the fact that he has impressive credentials makes you certain that he gives the Sox organization a competitive baseball advantage?”

    i’m not certain that he gives the red sox a competitive baseball advantage,but i think he may because he’s an expert on competitive strategy. the red sox have a lot of experts on their payroll that the yankees don’t seem to match up with. george mitchell is an obvious example. what ex senator do the yankees have in their pocket? bill james ? who do the yankees have? allaird baird , a former gm doing boring gm stuff theo doesn’t want to do? i just see a lot of help to the traditional gm role with the red sox.

    in the old baseball model, the gm seems to have been more important to the team. the new baseball front offices and managements of cleveand and boston are more than just the gm. there seems to more smart bodies doing stuff.

    i’m just sayng that cashman can’t be the lone ranger anymore. he’s gotta get more help.smart help.
    i think hmmm i right that the yankees are beginning that process and could catch up quickly. with their financial resources and the direction cashman has been taking with a view to the future, the yankees could turn into a smart organization on a dime, but they haven’t done it yet.

  78. Fernando Alejandro (Respect Jeter's Gangster) January 16th, 2008 at 10:04 am

    What would the argument be for Bernie getting into the hall? I’m not oppossed to it, but I don’t know that he’s hall of fame worthy.

  79. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 10:05 am

    buddy, i agree kubek was great, but he was too impartial for the yankees i think. they wanted a homer to toe the company line and let him go. Also Bill White was very good, and coincided with Scooter’s best work. Phil had alot of downside (WW) but actuall was pretty good. Younger fans probably remember him most as this kindly buffon who ate cannoli’s and invented the ‘shout out.’ but earlier he was much better, althogh always a homer. check him out if you can find a tape of the bucky f dent game with the radio calls on it, he was tuned in back then.

  80. Florida Yank January 16th, 2008 at 10:06 am

    SJ44 :

    I’m in agreement with Giambi’s weighty contract which to a point leaves Cashman the feeling of walking with a ball and chain. It puts restrictions on personnel moves he would otherwise be able to have an easier time making.
    To a lesser degree are the contracts of Mussina and Pavano. The best hope is that Giambi and Mussina can make some decent contribution toward the season.

  81. J-Dawg January 16th, 2008 at 10:09 am

    I always enjoyed Jim Kaat’s announcing as well. I always enjoyed listening to him announce for the Yankees, but he was also terrific back when baseball was on CBS in the early 90s. I have always thought that he and Dick Stockton really worked well together back then. I was just a youngster in those days and I learned a million things about the game while listening to them.

  82. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 10:13 am

    J-Dawg…have you read Jim Kaat’s book, “Still Pitching”? A great read. Talks about all aspects of his 50 years along with some great stories. One of the better sports bios around.

  83. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 10:13 am

    one thing about mitchell and his board of director’s job. does anyone know what the job entails (if anything?) i think they name famous red sox fans to the board to recognize them and keep them in the family. Does anyone actually think that Mitchell shows up with sharp pencils ready for a hard day at work? this is IMO an honorific to a Favorite Son of New England and nothing more.
    this is why almost nobody outside of new york worried about putting him in charge of the steroids investigation. everyone at the time seemed to say that, yes there was the appearance of partiality but didnt worry about it because the job was ceremonial and Mitchell’s reputation indicated that there would be no problems. Hindsight is 20/20 and since the report was so controversil, it turns out that it was a bad decision, but c’mon people Sen. Mitchell’s “job” with the red sox is a joke.

  84. jennifer- Hip Hip Jorge January 16th, 2008 at 10:15 am

    Let’s not forget that Jasons contract along with Mike’s were heavily backloaded. They were starting the Yesnetwork around the time we signed them. Well they are now paying for it, if Jasons contract wasn’t so heavy in the back end, maybe they could have traded him.

  85. randy l. January 16th, 2008 at 10:17 am

    sj44-

    good to see that the yankees are finally talking with vince gennarro since the yankees have the most to gain from his ideas . would you argue against the yankees adding a more diverse group of experts to create a more powerful front office? i don’t see this as a slam against cashman. i just think there’s something going on with the red sox and cleveland that isn’t as obvious with the yankees. i think much of the yankee success is still the brute power of their economic clout. add a smarter front office to that and watch out. i’m not saying fire cashman.i’m saying add organization to the gm position. create more depth.

  86. John in Ohio January 16th, 2008 at 10:18 am

    I agree about Orsello and Remy, they are excellent. (I’m a Yanks fan, but they’re fair and good, and ALWAYS praise Jeter.) Was watching a game once when the played a replay of Manny cutting off a throw from center. They couldn’t stop laughing for quite awhile. Had my son and I crying with laughter. It was really, really funny and entertaining.

    Mario Impemba now does local TV for the Tigers.

    I’ll repeat what I was screaming the other day…Sterling and Waldman must go. How in the world did this pair end up in the broadcast booth of the mighty New York Yankees? They must have pictures of The Boss and Cashman naked together or something. Jeeeeesh.

  87. TurnTwo January 16th, 2008 at 10:25 am

    I’ll admit, I love Cohen, Darling, and Hernandez at SNY… great mix of in-game baseball analysis and entertainment with at times just ridiculous stories and conversation you could imagine having with your buddies at home.

  88. J-Dawg January 16th, 2008 at 10:25 am

    GreenBeret7- No, I haven’t read it. Sounds like it would be a very good read. I may have to check that one out.

  89. Fernando Alejandro (Respect Jeter's Gangster) January 16th, 2008 at 10:26 am

    John in Ohio,

    Manny cutting off Damon’s throw is some classic footage. He literally went out of his way to cut that ball off.

  90. SJ44 January 16th, 2008 at 10:28 am

    Randy,

    I don’t know if all these supposed experts in Boston really have anything to do with winning. They had the best pitching last year. That’s why they won.

    Even with that, they almost blew a huge lead and only beat out the Yankees by 2 games.

    One could argue that if Joe Torre knew how to manage a bullpen, the Yankees would have made up that entire lead. Also, it was a whole lot easier to face an injured Angels team in the ALDS than the Indians.

    Sometimes, too many cooks spoil the food. I think baseball in general has become too corporate. Too many guys with titles and laptops for my liking.

    If given the choice of having more front office types or more scouts looking for players around the world (which is where the Yankees have put their resources the past 3 years) I lean toward hiring more scouts.

    That’s just me though. I am not as into statistical analysis as other people. I think it has its place in the game. However, I don’t believe its more important than finding talent. Something that gets lost in all the discussions about the Bill James-types in the game today.

  91. ken777 January 16th, 2008 at 10:28 am

    Give Cash a break will you. The GMs job is to set up the agenda, he then brings in people like; Stick, Fishman, Damon and others to implement his vision. Then, lets them do their job and he dose his. His job is; pull the trigger/make the best deal, get it done. Just like most CEOs, he doesn’t need to be a great talent scout that’s why he brings in the others.

  92. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 10:29 am

    The fact that Mitchell was on the board of director’s, in fact chairman of Disney, parent company to ESPN and the Angels at the same time as being on the board with the Red Sox should have thrown up flags all over the place. He’s not that pure.

  93. Buddy Biancalana January 16th, 2008 at 10:30 am

    Here;s an interesting article about Vince Gennaro from the NY Times:

    http://freakonomics.blogs.nyti.....cs-quorum/

  94. String Beanfellow January 16th, 2008 at 10:34 am

    IMB… if Mitchell’s position is a joke in the organization, then they have a very serious issue being that Mitchell is listed as the number 4 person in that organization. He gets money from them. He got a WS ring from them.

  95. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 10:34 am

    J on O

    the manny cut-off is THE BEST!!! it NEVER get old!!! it easily dethrones the HR ball off Canseco’s noggin as my #1 favorite!

  96. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 10:35 am

    SJ44….let me know what bullpen Torre has had in 6 years, outside of Rivera, and for two years, Gordon.

  97. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 10:37 am

    As a matter of fact, tell me about the rotation that never went more than 3 deep in 6 years.

  98. Buddy Biancalana January 16th, 2008 at 10:37 am

    Phil had alot of downside (WW) but actuall was pretty good. Younger fans probably remember him most as this kindly buffon who ate cannoli’s and invented the ’shout out.’ but earlier he was much better, althogh always a homer.

    ————————————————————————-

    Classic line about Scooter inventing the “shout-out”.

  99. Doreen January 16th, 2008 at 10:40 am

    Turn Two -

    Is with much chagrin that I will also admit to liking Darling/Hernandez/Cohen for the Mets. Darling started out slow and stiff, but has really become comfortable in the booth. I don’t think I could take Hernandez with Ronnie to balance him out (personality-wise), but he’s got a lot of good insight. Cohen’s just good. And, yeah, you could imagine having a conversation with them.

    I don’t like Michael Kay and the only times I can stand him are when Paul O’Neil is in the booth, because O’Neil just teases him. The Yankees have such a rotation of guys, which I suppose is good since any one rotation can leave you wanting something else. I think I could like a few different combinations of Yankee announcers as long as Kay was not there.

    As for the radio — I can’t listen. Between Sterling just getting things wrong (either over- or understating plays), the boredom and “been there, done that” undertone to his delivery, and the darn commercials every .5 seconds, (that curve ball was brought to you by…), it is just not an enjoyable way to listen to the game. Suzyn, well, some things I like about her, some I don’t. It always amazes me, however, that there are people in broadcasting who, how shall I say this kindly, just don’t have the speaking voice for it.

  100. John in Ohio January 16th, 2008 at 10:40 am

    LOL

    I’m telling you that they could not do the game for at least two batters because they were paralyzed with laughter. They were trying to talk, but they couldn’t. Great stuff.

    The first time I heard Orsello I was sure that it was Sean McDonnaugh…their voices are almost identical.

  101. Doreen January 16th, 2008 at 10:43 am

    * I meant I couldn’t take Hernandez WITHOUT Ronnie to balance him out. Yuch.

  102. Doreen January 16th, 2008 at 10:43 am

    Is the Manny cut-off available for on-line viewing anywhere?

  103. Buddy Biancalana January 16th, 2008 at 10:44 am

    Here’s a great feature that http://www.mlbtraderumors.com is starting, it’s trades atht could have been, this one is about Becekett & Lowell to the Rangers for Blalock & Danks, I wish that trade had gone through.

    http://www.mlbtraderumors.com/.....ve-be.html

  104. SJ44 January 16th, 2008 at 10:44 am

    That’s a lot of excuses for Torre.

    How about using Luis Vizcaino 13 times in the second half of the season with leads of 4 our more runs? He blew out the guy because he didn’t have the patience or confidence to work other pitchers into the mix.

    Let’s not get on the “he didn’t have talent” bandwagon. He had PLENTY of talent. He just didn’t have 5 all stars on the mound.

    Which, BTW, shouldn’t be the criteria in judging his success.

    He had enough pitching to manage the bullpen better. Hell, even his biggest boosters will tell you he kills bullpens. Its just the way he manages.

    He had a guy in Vizcaino who was unhittable for almost 3 months. Instead of resting him or, more precisely, using him intelligently in the second half of the season, he blew him out. Unnecessarily, IMO.

    The “Joba Rules” weren’t put in place for Joba. They were put in place for Torre. Even with that, he overused the kid in Game 3 of the ALDS.

    Joe Torre did a lot of great things as manager of the Yankees. Managing a bullpen intelligently and effectively was not one of those things.

  105. TurnTwo January 16th, 2008 at 10:45 am

    Doreen, i agree that its the balance of Darling with Hernandez that makes it work.

    and I really cant stand Kay… he comes across at times to me to be too preachy for someone who never played the game of baseball… and me and my friends have a huge issue with the way that he uses the word ironic- he always uses it wrong, and it drives us crazy.

  106. jennifer- Hip Hip Jorge January 16th, 2008 at 10:47 am

    And he was always on this kick of pulling a guy before he messed up as to not ruin his confidence. Say Henn for instance, he’d have a great inning and instead of letting him go a second, he put Viz in the game.

  107. Doreen January 16th, 2008 at 10:47 am

    The other thing that bothers me about the Yankee radio broadcasts is THEY NEVER GIVE THE SCORE. Usually, if I’m listening to the game on radio it is because I am driving and do not have access to, nor would I want to be watching, a television. I am not kidding that many, many, many minutes go by without the simple update of, say, Yankees lead 2 to 1, and the pitch by…. It is just simply ridiculous.

  108. John in Ohio January 16th, 2008 at 10:47 am

    I must rant one more time…

    As a long distance Yankees fan here in Ohio, I’m forced to listen to the games via radio broadcast over the internet. (I had MLB Extra Innings for years, until they pulled that crap last year.) Thankfully, I can choose between WCBS or the other teams’ broadcast. I ALWAYS choose the alternative to John Sterling and Suzyn Waldman.

    Admittedly, I’m spoiled. I grew up listening to the great Ernie Harwell broadcast Tigers’ games. Ernie’s listeners always knew where the ball was.

    If WCBS was my only choice, I simply wouldn’t listen. John Sterling is beyond laughably horrible. It’s like he’s singing the play-by-play…”Th-uhhhhhhhhhhh- pitch…” And the sophomoric nicknames and home run calls are just ridiculous. (Not to mention the home run calls which are NOT home runs. When he called one saying “It is high, it is far, it is gone! The Melkman delivers” and it was actually a fly out, it was the last straw for me.)

    And goodness, goodness, gracious, Suzyn Waldman’s voice is like fingernails on a chalkboard. She has no credibility as a color – uh – person, because she obviously never played the game.

    The Yankees’ loyalty to this pair is simply unbelievable.

  109. Doreen January 16th, 2008 at 10:47 am

    Turn Two -

    One could say it is ironic how Kay uses the word “ironic.”

  110. jennifer- Hip Hip Jorge January 16th, 2008 at 10:48 am

    What about the falicy of the predetermined outcome.

    Or always mentioning that Menche has a big head, the biggest in baseball.

  111. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 10:49 am

    string,

    if Mitchell actually does do real work for the sox (not just P.R.), then i stand corrected but as far as the ring goes check this out:
    http://jewelry.about.com/b/200.....-rings.htm

  112. Doreen January 16th, 2008 at 10:51 am

    John in Ohio –

    Unfailingly there will be several times during the season when my husband will walk in the door after coming home from work and ask me, “So, how far was that ball, really?” after listening to Sterling’s call. More than several, actually. It’s indefensible.

  113. raymagnetic â„¢ January 16th, 2008 at 10:54 am

    “i just think there’s something going on with the red sox and cleveland that isn’t as obvious with the yankees.”

    Look I get it, you don’t like Cashman, whatever, that’s your perogative. But your infatuation with the front offices of the Red Sox and Cleveland is really a joke. Cleveland has made the playoffs exactly 2 times in the past 7 years. Twice, and to paraphrase Dennis Green, you’re ready to give these guys the crown. Oh puhleeze. The Red Sox have made a ton of errors in the last four years. The Red Sox have had a musical chairs of shortstops the past 4 years, overpaid for a declining JD Drew, seemingly overpaid for Matsuzaka and have basically been copying the Yankees M.O. in recent history. A year ago this time no one in their right mind would say that the Red Sox organization was smarter than the Yankees organization. Now all of a sudden they are baseball guru’s and the Yankees are baseball’s version of Forrest Gump?

    I’m really curious, how long have you been a Yankee fan? Since 1996? You make good posts from time to time, but your infatuation of the Red Sox and your hatred of Cashman really makes you sound like a spoiled child. End Rant

  114. Yanksrule57 January 16th, 2008 at 10:55 am

    John in Ohio,

    You are spot on re Orsello sounding like Mc Donnough. I used to listen to Sean do Celtics games in the 80′s with Tommy H and Bob Cousy. I was living in CT at the time and although I grew up a knicks fan, I loved watchung Larry Bird play. Sean was great at play by play.

    Re the Yankees announcers, I think the Bill White, Scooter, Frank Messer (no one ever mentions him) group was the best.
    But some of it may be that when you grow up listening to someone it becomes familiar and comfortable. I can’t see getting comfortable to Suzyn’s voice though, Sheesh!
    I do like Murcer, Singleton, and Kaat best of the recent guys. I have always like Bobby though and nearly cried when he was traded to the Giants.

  115. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 10:58 am

    SJ44, “The Joba Rules” were put in place throught the system for every young pitcher and every manager. Whether you liked Torre or not, you can’t honestly think that Quantrill (over 300 games in the 4 years before joining NY) or Tanyon Sturtz among the 30 other bullpenners during that time. Rotations that were patched together after Clemens, Pettitte and Wells all left after the 2003 season. Through all of that turnover, he still one. He must have done something right. It’s also annoying that you’ve decided who the “Torre Apologists” are.

  116. Yanksrule57 January 16th, 2008 at 10:58 am

    “watching” Lary bird…. Jeez, Watchung is a town in central Jersey.

  117. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 10:59 am

    re: kay and waldman; who’s bright idea was it that reporters would make good radio people? if you think kay is bad on YES, he was MUCH worse on the radio with Sterling. didnt anyone ask them to do an audition tape or something? if they had, it would have been plainly obvious that they were not up to the job.

    i like the mets team much better, although hernandez is very perceptive, but has no broadcasting skills and they havent learned how to use him constructivly without allowing him to make a fool of himself. darling is very good and getting better all the time.cohen/rose/coleman are very solid, they give you the game without trying to upstage it. did i hear that one of them isnt coming back this year?

  118. Fernando Alejandro (Respect Jeter's Gangster) January 16th, 2008 at 11:00 am

    Hey if people are looking for something to pass the time, check out my blog:

    http://respectjetersgangster.blogspot.com

    It highlightes the use of the latest statistical tool PEDP+.

    Shameless plug aside, has anyone heard anything about Carmen Angelini not being invited to spring training?

  119. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 11:04 am

    re frank messer: dont want to speak ill of the dead, so i wont. but that reminds me of ralph kiner. enough said.

  120. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 11:04 am

    Angelini is not quite 19 and has less than 10 games of pro-baseball. No real reason for him to be there.

  121. Fernando Alejandro (Respect Jeter's Gangster) January 16th, 2008 at 11:06 am

    That’s a good point on Angelini. I just figured they’d invite some of their top draft picks.

  122. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 11:06 am

    was studying my algebra and this is what i came up with:
    pedp+warp3 = plese shoot me!

  123. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 11:07 am

    gotta work on my spelling now!

  124. swo January 16th, 2008 at 11:08 am

    Ugh. This is so transparent.

    The media is reporting so much about Brian Cashman’s “diminished role” because they so desperately want it to be true. I mean, it would make for great news, and they could start writing their drafts about the collapse of the Yankees dynasty.

    But so far, there is simply nothing to go on. A quote from Cashman about how “things are different”, a bunch of quotes from Hank about how he’s waffling on Santana, and suddenly Brian Cashman is being ousted as GM and “Chairman Hank” or the “Tampa Trio” is initiating a hostile takeover?

    Please.

    We know that January is a slow baseball month, but surely we can do better than conspiracy theorizing.

  125. John in Ohio January 16th, 2008 at 11:10 am

    Yanks Rule

    I remember where I was when I heard the news about Murcer being traded. I was playing football with some buddies and my brother came up on his bike and broke the news to me.

    I don’t think I cried in front of the other guys, but I was NOT HAPPY, that’s for sure. Getting Bobby Bonds eased the pain somewhat, but Murcer was my favorite Yank. He played here for the Mud Hens (65?, 66?), and I have his autograph on an old program somewhere.

  126. ed January 16th, 2008 at 11:12 am

    off topic, but good q&a from nick cafardo below. says sox may be hoping the mets grab johan, and lugo may have a short leash.

    http://mlbfleecefactor.com/200.....ton-globe/

  127. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 11:15 am

    murcer is great! and very humble. he could easily just wing it and tell stories about whitey, mick and billy, but he actually comes in prepared and ready for the job. very impressive! Put him and Singleton in the booth and i’m all set. unfortunatly that only seems to happen on a tuesday night in Kansas City.

  128. whozat January 16th, 2008 at 11:16 am

    “That’s a good point on Angelini. I just figured they’d invite some of their top draft picks.”

    Why? That’s pretty rare. I figure the reason the really young catchers are getting to come to MLB camp is because either:
    a) Joe G was a catcher and wants to see them personally
    b) They know Jorge is aging and want to get a first-hand look at where the organization is at C to decide whether they need to trade for a promising AA/AAA C prospect
    c) They want Tony Pena to drill all these kids personally because he’s awesome
    d) They want to look at them all first-hand to decide who goes to which level on the minors
    e) all of the above

    where “they” is guys like cash, stick and whoever else is a the top of the minor league coordination hierarchy. And, I kinda figure the same with Tabata and Jackson…they want to see personally where these kids are so they can make plans about the OF for the next several years.

  129. Shmooperific January 16th, 2008 at 11:17 am

    I can’t really say that Cashman is a “true Yankee favorite”. I know a lot of people who really aren’t on board with Cashman and his string of bad deals not involving Steinbrenner Sr. He really isn’t all that great and missed out on a lot of deals he should have made, but he seemed too concerned with signing over age has-beens instead.

  130. randy l. January 16th, 2008 at 11:17 am

    “Sometimes, too many cooks spoil the food. I think baseball in general has become too corporate. Too many guys with titles and laptops for my liking”

    sj 44-
    i actually agree with you. anyone who knows me knows i can’t stand sabermetricians who have never played the game who think they know the game. they don’t.
    but people like gennaro and porter are a different kind of expert. they are more marketplace experts (and i think sabermetrics has value as part of the management team).

    it seems like boston’s strategy is to throw enough experts against the wall and one of them will stick. kind of like how they “discovered” ortiz” by throwing 6 first baseman/dhs against the wall.

    so on the baseball field the red sox had better pitching, but off the baseball field how did they get better pitching? they hired farrel. that helped. they shocked everyone and outbid everyone including the yankees for matsuzaka. this aquisition seems like a place where a gennaro/michael porter type consultant would come in. it was a different kind of strategy in seemingly overpaying for matsuzaka, but who can argue with the results. i don’t think the red sox would have won without matsuzaka. i also don’t know their “experts” had anything to do with it , but i suspect they did.

    i also don’t think the smartness of cleveland and the red sox front offices is because of sabermetric smarts. i think it’s more marketplace smarts. though the two are interrelated. adding more scouts as a marketplace strategy makes sense to me. we’re on the same page there. i just think cashman needs more help in making the strategic decisions like adding more scouts.

    i just want the yankees to get better in the front office and management so they can make better decisions and get better on the field. i especially do not want to see a third red sox championship.

    if i do, i’m moving to florida like you ,so i don’t run into red sox fans every day.

  131. rodg12 January 16th, 2008 at 11:18 am

    I’m with you i miss bernie. I absolutely love it when Kay’s gone and it’s just Singleton and Murcer/Leiter/O’neill. I just get so sick of Kay most of the time. The one thing that really, really used to peeve me was when he’d do the whole ‘game time an UNMANAGEABLE 3 hrs 35 minutes’ bit. YOU’VE GOT THE ABSOLUTE DREAM JOB OF BEING THE YANKS TV ANNOUNCER!!! SHUT UP ABOUT HOW LONG THE GAME WAS!!!!

  132. Skippy January 16th, 2008 at 11:19 am

    I’m generally for Cashman (except for one trade in particular that really irritated me) and appreciate his attempt to build a long term plan for the team. Is it fair, though, to say he drafted Hughes, Chamberlain, etc? Or was that actually Damon Oppenheimer, with Cashman just signing off?

  133. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 11:21 am

    this just in:
    the yankees plan on wearing a midnight blue cap with interlocking white N and Y.

  134. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 11:26 am

    For those Home Run Calls…

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L.....n_baseball

  135. whozat January 16th, 2008 at 11:28 am

    “i don’t think the red sox would have won without matsuzaka.”

    Without a league average pitcher? It’s not that hard to replace the kind of production Matsuzaka provided. I suspect that, as teams learn to wait him out, he’ll just get worse.

  136. John in Ohio January 16th, 2008 at 11:29 am

    OFF TOPIC(S)

    I’d like to see some kind of grass roots effort in New York for the Giants to play one last game next year at Yankee Stadium before demolition. Giants vs. Colts, or one of the really old franchises…Redskins, Bears, Pack, Lions, Steelers, Cards. Would be very cool stuff.

  137. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 11:29 am

    Mattingly – Olerud
    line: .307/.358/.471 – .295/.398/.465
    OPS: .829 – .863
    OPS+: 127 – 128
    WARP3: 84.7 – 118.2
    EQA: .289 – .298
    Games: 1785 – 2234
    AB: 7003 – 7592
    Hits: 2153 – 2239
    BB: 588 – 1275
    2B: 442 – 500
    HRs: 222 – 255
    RBIs: 1099 – 1230
    5 year OPS+ Peak: 161/156/156/146/133 – 186/163/140/136/135
    Gold Gloves: 9 – 3

    Both were considered excellent defensive 1Bman. i don’t see any argument that Mattingly was a superior hitter. Olerud also has 2 rings.

    so is John Olerud a Hall of Famer? he was a better player for longer than Mattingly.

  138. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 11:29 am

    The main reason for all of the catchers is because of all of the pitchers coming to camp. I’m sure Pena will be doing a lot of teaching, also.

  139. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 11:31 am

    “Is it fair, though, to say he drafted Hughes, Chamberlain, etc? Or was that actually Damon Oppenheimer, with Cashman just signing off?”

    he put Oppenheimer in charge of the draft.

    that’s what a General Manager should do. surround himself with good people.

    yes, it goes on his resume.

  140. randy l. January 16th, 2008 at 11:40 am

    “I’m really curious, how long have you been a Yankee fan? Since 1996? ”
    well, i loved pee wee reese in 1955 much to my father’s chagrin.but from then on mantle was my man. my dad switched me to batting lefty right about then to make me better suited for the yankees. a little thing called the vietmam war and 60′s distracted me a bit form baseball so it took me until 1989 to find myself on a field in uniform playing catch to warm up for a game with graig nettles our first baseman and clete boyer who was our manager.

    i was just a bull pen catcher which is one level above the guy who picks up the towels, but i guess that answers your question.

    how about you. how long have you been a yankee fan?

  141. Matt Schweber January 16th, 2008 at 11:41 am

    Has anyone read Diamond Dollars: The Economics of Winning in Baseball, Gennaro’s book?

    I have a stack of ten books on my desk waiting for me to read. But I’m always happy to add another if it’s worth it.

    Unfortunately, the NYPL doesn’t have a copy of Gennaro’s book.

    If any of you have read, I’d welcome a quick opinion on whether it’s worth purchasing.

  142. SJ44 January 16th, 2008 at 11:51 am

    Gennero’s book is an excellent read. He is a real interesting guy. Not a self-promoter and doesn’t force his views down your throat.

    He has very interesting points to make and I think he is an asset to any organization that uses his services.

    Randy,

    I think Cashman and the Yankees took a big step forward in modernizing their operation with the hiring of Girardi and Eiland.

    They went, “against the book” if you will. They moved away from hiring another icon-like figure and hired two guys who are very much into today’s baseball. That is, using statistical analysis and a more detailed view of utilizing pitching effectively than they had under Torre/Guidry/Mel the past few years.

    Less Old School and more New School.

    I think the hiring of Girardi signaled the Yankees going into that “new direction” that teams such as Cleveland and Boston have done successfully the past few years.

  143. raymagnetic â„¢ January 16th, 2008 at 11:56 am

    “how about you. how long have you been a yankee fan?”

    Since about 84.

  144. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 11:58 am

    hall of fame question for next year:

    Rickey Henderson; yankees cap or oakland cap?

  145. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 12:02 pm

    I seriously doubt that Girardi makes it past 2 years. He tries to get to much involved in things that are not his domain, and, the first time he tells a Steinbrenner to shut up and sit down, he’s gone…or, if 3 starters and a relief pitcher goes on the DL and needs arm surgery.

  146. Bob from NJ January 16th, 2008 at 12:03 pm

    There’s no shame in lagging behind the Indians, they are the league’s model franchise, along with the Red Sox, probably. They have Bill James and Michael Porter on the payroll and had Voros McCracken as a consultant (the creater of DIPS) for a few years. I know for a fact that the Yankees are looking to hire sabermetricians to work in the FO, Cashman has definitely realized the value of statistical analysis. In terms of scouting/development, the Yankees probably compare favorably with anyone.

  147. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 12:03 pm

    Henderson is strictly Oakland

  148. TurnTwo January 16th, 2008 at 12:04 pm

    Girardi isnt going anywhere.

    I would think Rickey goes in with an Oakland cap.

  149. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 12:05 pm

    “Randy,

    I think Cashman and the Yankees took a big step forward in modernizing their operation with the hiring of Girardi and Eiland.”

    Amen to this. nothing against Torre, but this is a huge, huge point.

    “Rickey Henderson; yankees cap or oakland cap?”

    Blue Jays.

  150. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 12:06 pm

    When they start hiring and firing on the say so of computers, it’s time to quit.

  151. gayle January 16th, 2008 at 12:06 pm

    FYI in case anyone missed it Basbeall Prospectus has its Breakout 2008 list and lo and behold who is on it….

    Melky Cabrera. Cabrera went backwards in ’07, but not by enough for concern. Remember that he is just 23 years old and has more than 1100 plate appearances in the majors, with average to average-plus defense (good physical tools, but very raw, takes bad routes) and a very good 129/96 K/BB. He is a mature player offensively, patient at the plate and fair on the bases (25-for-35 stealing in his career). One interesting quirk is his G/F ratio, which is 1.63 for his career and was a whopping 1.81 last season. Cabrera is listed at 5’11” and 200 pounds. He’s not Willy Taveras, but rather a player who should be developing power and learning how to drive the ball, rather than hitting the ball on the ground 60 percent of the time.
    I’m reminded of Alex Rios, who doesn’t look a thing like Cabrera. Rios was largely disappointing in 2004 and 2005, hitting just 11 homers in more than 900 at-bats, with an isolated power of 117. The problem: Rios was hitting the ball on the ground too much, a 1.82 G/F in those two seasons. Starting in ’06, Rios put the ball in the air more than half the time, and became a star. When you look at Cabrera’s body, his established control of the strike zone, and his ability to hold his own at a young age, you recognize that all it’s going to take is for him to start elevating the ball. Cabrera may not get there in 2008, but he’s going to pop 80 extra-base hits and slug .500 in a season very, very soon.

  152. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 12:08 pm

    wow, how did i miss cleveland becoming the model franchise? how could i have missed all those visits to the WS and all those rings? and they have bill james! cant argue with that!

  153. John in Ohio January 16th, 2008 at 12:10 pm

    Rickey will be, and should be, wearing an A’s cap.

    I think he just might unseat Tom Seaver with the highest percentage of voters ever. Most runs scored ever…that’s BIG.

  154. randy l. January 16th, 2008 at 12:10 pm

    “he put Oppenheimer in charge of the draft.
    that’s what a General Manager should do. surround himself with good people.”

    that’s what i’m talking about, a few mores hires like that and i’m happy.

    sj44-
    i really see the hiring of girardi as a major step in the right direction. and yes i realize cashman had a lot to do with that hiring. eiland, i know little about, but maybe you could add him to your minor league coaches report because he’s so new and coming from the minor league organization.

    i would especially like to know what his pitching philosohy is and how pitching tech savvy he is( biomechanics, injury prevention, etc ), and how smart he is in general. there is something to be said for a coaching staff consisting of people like long and eiland who weren’t stars. this is a big turn from having all former all stars coaching. i don’t know that it’s better, but the change may be a good for the new direction the team is taking with all the young players.

  155. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 12:11 pm

    Cabrera’s still got a lot of baby fat, from a lifetime diet of rice, fried beans and greasey chicken. He’ll start getting leaner and stronger as will Cano, I think.

  156. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 12:12 pm

    “FYI in case anyone missed it Basbeall Prospectus has its Breakout 2008 list and lo and behold who is on it….”

    this was discussed a bit yesterday.

    basically, it is nice to hear someone think so highly of Melky, but his predictions are waaaaaaaay too optimistic to be taken without a huge grain of salt.

    80 XBH’s would make Melky one of the best players in all of baseball. i doubt even his staunchest supporters see Melky’s upside quite that high.

  157. Bob from NJ January 16th, 2008 at 12:13 pm

    I am enthused by Sheehan’s confidence in Melky, but 80 XBHs is ridiculous and would shatter his 95% PECOTA projection.

  158. gayle January 16th, 2008 at 12:13 pm

    And speaking of tv coverage of the Yankees saw this little news item. Not too happy about it as even though it is the same broadcast in terms of actual game there is no pre or post game coverage like YES. Also seems like 21 games is a lot more than what they had last year but maybe I am wrong on that.

    WWOR-TV/My9 will televise 21 Yankees regular-season games this season.

    The schedule includes three games against the Boston Red Sox, all in the second half of the season, and the Subway Series opener against the Mets on May 16. The Red Sox games are July 25, Aug. 26 and Sept. 26.

  159. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 12:15 pm

    cant agree more, rickey should be unanimous as there is absolutly no justification for not voting him in, but some idiot is gonna NOT vote for him because he played cards or because he called himself rickey.
    i say anyone who doesnt vote for him should have his voting rights voided.

  160. SJ44 January 16th, 2008 at 12:16 pm

    Cleveland is the model franchise in terms of how they run their operation. They don’t have the money the Yankees and Red Sox have, yet have put together a quality product.

    Its not a coincidence their scouts and suppport personnel in the front office are widely sought after by other teams.

    Its more than just winning games. Its utilizing your assets to the best of your ability.

    To that end, nobody has done it better than the Indians the past 3-4 years.

    Girardi isn’t going anywhere. He didn’t, “try to do too much” in Florida. He tried to model their on and off field actions like the Yankees.

    If that’s a firable offense, then so be it. Its the Yankees gain.

    Also, I doubt Hank Steinbrenner will be sitting behind home plate, drunk, and yelling at umpires.

    If he is, Girardi will tell him to shut up, just as he told Loria.

    BTW, Girardi and Cashman talk EVERY DAY. How do I know? Girardi told me when I spoke when we were on the same flight recently. He told me Cashman calls him everyday with updates as to what’s going on, things they want to do, etc.

    He also said he and the Steinbrenner’s are open to any or all suggestions he has.

    He didn’t share any nuggets (as in Santana talk) with me. Just talked in general about his relationship with Cashman, in the few minutes he was kind enough to chat with me.

  161. B-D-4 trains January 16th, 2008 at 12:17 pm

    A best guess is that before the interview process with Joe Girardi happened, the Steinbrenners, Cashman and others discussed any dislike for Torre’s managerial style, “aired it out”, and a clean slate was established.
    Among the things they probably wanted to dicuss with Girardi was his bullpen usage ideas and strategies used in advancing runners opposed to waiting for the big inning VIA the long ball.

  162. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 12:19 pm

    i may have misspoken about no justification for rickey, i havent checked his dufus+/-3 rating!

  163. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 12:20 pm

    Randy, if it weren’t for family issues, Gil Patterson would have been my first choice as a replacement. The guy had the perfect mechanics coming up. It’s such a pity that his arm was trashed the way it was. Guidry and Lieter says that Patterson could have been Roger Clemens/Tom Seaver. Upper 90s fastball, Guidry type slider, change and a big curve ball. He got back into baseball after five years away, because George Steinbrenner was him at a restareant parking cars and offered him a job. He spent his time trying to pitch left handed, gave up and went into coaching.

  164. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 12:21 pm

    “Among the things they probably wanted to dicuss with Girardi was his bullpen usage ideas and strategies used in advancing runners opposed to waiting for the big inning VIA the long ball.”

    yeah, i really doubt they sat down to talk about how to play more “small ball”.

  165. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 12:24 pm

    Steinbrenner saw him….not was his

  166. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 12:27 pm

    The yankees haven’t been built for being a “small ball” team for years. There are very few players on the team that can sac bunt. They bunt for hits…not nearly the same..and Jeter’s bunting skills have regressed over the last 3-4 years.

  167. Old Yanks Fan January 16th, 2008 at 12:29 pm

    I will also admit to liking Darling/Hernandez/Cohen for the Mets.
    ————————————————
    I’m not sure, but if you guys are talking about David CONE, I’m not sure if he would approve of you making him Jewish.

  168. murphydog January 16th, 2008 at 12:30 pm

    Just to round out the winter baseball economics and statistics reading list, may I recommend “The Book on the Book,” by Bill Felber; “The Baseball Economist” by JC Bradbury and “Winners: How Good Baseball Teams Become Great Ones (And It’s Not the Way You Think), Dayn Perry. I read Moneyball too, of course. It all comes down to using better data to make better decisions; there’s still no Unified Theory of the Baseball Universe.

    For the summer reading list I really recommend “A Game of Inches: The Stories Behind the Innovations That Shaped Baseball, Volume 1: The Game on the Field;” and “A Game of Inches: The Stories Behind the Innovations That Shaped Baseball: The Game Behind the Scenes, Vol. 2″ both by Peter Morris. The pair will cost you $40-ish new and you’ll need some free time to get through them. But I really enjoyed Morris’ style and got a huge data dump on my favorite game.

  169. randy l. January 16th, 2008 at 12:32 pm

    raymagnetic-
    i don’t think we really have a problem. we’re both yankee fans. we obviously both care about the team. i throw a lot out there because i like to compete even with ideas. ask hmmm. we butted heads for a while before we both decided that each other wasn’t a complete idiot.

    i suspect i’m going to butt heads with bob from nj because of his strong sabermetric views, but how do you butt heads with someone intelligent and not learn something. i suspect there are a lot of people on this blog who have experience and positions that would be surprising if their credentials were known.

    an argument should stand on it’s merit and not on the credentials of the person. i learned the other day on the blog that’s a kind of ad hominem thing. the only reason i gave a glimpse of my background is you asked and it gets old for anyone having their yankee loyalties questioned just because they question things about the yankees.

    ironically if you want to get a job in baseball ,you never show any fan loyalties. that would be unprofessional. pros do it for the money.

  170. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 12:33 pm

    re:bunting
    of course the yankees cant bunt b/c torre never asked anybody to. then in a tight game in sept or oct. he’d give some1 the bunt signal and the batter would have to go check with bowa to make sure he got it right. then he’d pop one up to the pitcher. i love torre but that drove me crazy! i think jeter has gotten worse b/c he was giving up outs and nobody else on the team even tried.

    i like what Willie Randolph did this year, at one point he signaled for david newhan to sac and newhan basically made on effort on two pitches, then singled with 2 strikes. nobody said why but newhan was back in the minors like 2 days later…

  171. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 12:35 pm

    *made no effort* not made on effort.

  172. Bob from NJ January 16th, 2008 at 12:36 pm

    murphydog,

    I agree with your comment about Moneyball. Pete’s intro to this article, where he claims the author is a “Moneyball-disciple” really highlights this common misconception. Moneyball is not about sabermetrics vs. traditional baseball analysis. It’s about identifying undervalued commodities in the marketplace and using this to your advantage.

  173. pat January 16th, 2008 at 12:37 pm

    When the kids have pitching rules in place this year, and they will, who will they be blamed on now that Torre is gone?

    Joba rules and any other pitching rules are put in place to save young pitchers from themselves, not a manager. Once they get a taste of the big leagues, they aren’t going to refuse to take the ball.

    I’ve said it a million times before and I’ll say it again, middle relievers are interchangable parts otherwise they wouldn’t be middle relievers. You work them till you burn them out and then replace them with another one. Lucky managers get 2 that they can alternate but most don’t have that luxury.

  174. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 12:41 pm

    sorry re bunting; jeter was giving up rbi chances, not outs.

  175. murphydog January 16th, 2008 at 12:41 pm

    gayle:

    Let’s hope BP has it right about Melky.

  176. TurnTwo January 16th, 2008 at 12:43 pm

    OYF: no, we werent refering to David Cone. Gary Cohen is SNY’s play-by-play man, and he’s much better at it than Michael Kay.

  177. S.o.S.27 January 16th, 2008 at 12:45 pm

    GreenBeret7
    January 16th, 2008 at 12:02 pm
    I seriously doubt that Girardi makes it past 2 years. He tries to get to much involved in things that are not his domain, and, the first time he tells a Steinbrenner to shut up and sit down, he’s gone…or, if 3 starters and a relief pitcher goes on the DL and needs arm surgery.

    I have to disagree. Girardi went to Florida and before he could step on to the field they stripped him from all his good players. I dont think he expected to manage a aaa squad when he signed up for the gig. As far as having a rift with the Yankees. He played here before and knows how it his place. Ask Moss why he doesnt act up in New England. This has been the job hes wanted all along and im sure they arent going to rebuild anytime soon. Let me just add that he will never be caught sleeping or picking his nose on the bench.I predict 12 years as the manager of the yanks and more youth on the squad. #27 in 08. MANAGER OF THE YEAR.

    Did anyone see Jeter on espn yesterday. I heard he was working out this winter and it showed. He didnt have the double chin action with puffed up cheeks. Chizzled. I like what he said about Girardi holding his bat. I think that shows that he isnt changing his approach and accepting the new.

  178. randy l. January 16th, 2008 at 12:46 pm

    “Moneyball is not about sabermetrics vs. traditional baseball analysis. It’s about identifying undervalued commodities in the marketplace and using this to your advantage.”

    right, when everyone caught on to beane’s strategy of drafting players with a high on base percentage that raised the price of those players so he moved on to something else that wasn’t valued in the marketplace. i suspect figuring out how to identify undervalued defensive players to be the next way to get undervalued players.

  179. raymagnetic â„¢ January 16th, 2008 at 12:48 pm

    randy l. – I agree with most of your post @ 12:32.

  180. Whoever January 16th, 2008 at 12:48 pm

    Did anyone check out the new article on MLB about Jeter and Cano’s being a great duo. If you didn’t Check It Out

  181. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 12:49 pm

    “ask hmmm. we butted heads for a while before we both decided that each other wasn’t a complete idiot.”

    wait a second, i never said i wasn’t a complete idiot.

    randy is right though. a lot of my early problems with randy stemmed from just the general frustration slogging through all the pessimism and nonsense that was on this blog when i first found it. the bandwagoners/trolls/a-rod bashers/etc. were out of control last winter.

    randy has a different perspective on things. i can value that even when i disagree.

  182. randy l. January 16th, 2008 at 12:49 pm

    green beret 7-
    i’ve read good things about gil patterson. he’s still an important part of the minor league system isn’t he?

  183. S.o.S.27 January 16th, 2008 at 12:49 pm

    One more thing. Its refreshing to see the Manager show up to thw winter meetings for a change.

  184. pat January 16th, 2008 at 12:50 pm

    SOS
    Didn’t see Jeter on ESPN but saw pics of him from Jorge’s Basebowl event from this weekend. I would believe he has worked out because he looks less puffy and more sculpted. Pics are on nyyfans.com, I think.

  185. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 12:53 pm

    ditto on randy’s 1232 post. i think the fact that we are here discussing the yanks in detail in january in itself demonstrates our fan loyalty.

  186. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 12:56 pm

    “Did anyone see Jeter on espn yesterday. I heard he was working out this winter and it showed. He didnt have the double chin action with puffed up cheeks. ”

    anyone think this is a coincidence and has nothing to do with Girardi’s hiring??

    i think Torre took it way too easy on his stars the last few years and it showed in the team’s performance in April.

  187. raymagnetic â„¢ January 16th, 2008 at 12:56 pm

    “SOS
    Didn’t see Jeter on ESPN but saw pics of him from Jorge’s Basebowl event from this weekend. I would believe he has worked out because he looks less puffy and more sculpted. Pics are on nyyfans.com, I think”

    I just saw the pics and my reaction is Bernie must definitely have called it quits. He is in no way shape or form ready to play baseball again. Jeter does look much slimmer.

  188. murphydog January 16th, 2008 at 12:57 pm

    Bob from NJ:

    It’s very enticing to think that a person could “unlock the secrets of winning baseball” if we just could do enough research and borrow Deep Blue from IBM for a few months. Reminds me a bit of alchemy though.

  189. Bob from NJ January 16th, 2008 at 12:58 pm

    randy l.,

    Advanced fielding metrics are not the next frontier for front offices. In reality, the current metrics are not perfect but, when combined with intense scouting reports, they’re ‘good enough’. The advanced front offices probably have methods even more sophisticated than the best publicly available data. I think that the next frontier is evaluating the health risks of young pitchers. Why do some pitchers experience arm trouble and some don’t? Workload, age, lefties vs. righties, body type, mechanics, etc. are all possible factors.

  190. GreenBeret7 January 16th, 2008 at 1:00 pm

    Randy, yes…He still works with the kids in Tampa. He’s turned down offers to move up, but, because of his son, he’s turned them down. Doc Halliday credits him with rebuilding his motion in Toronto.

  191. SJ44 January 16th, 2008 at 1:02 pm

    Not only show up for the Winter Meetings, Girardi also went to the DR to talk to the players training at the Yankees facility.

    He also has a very good working knowledge of the minor league system. You ask him about certain players in the minors and he was able to give you a pretty good capsule scouting report on them.

    Its just a different approach from Torre. Sometimes, when a manager or player reaches icon status, its awfully difficult for them to make substantive changes in their approach.

    I think things will be different under Girardi in a lot of areas. At this point, I don’t think that’s a bad thing for the Yankees.

    Something had to change. This team has been too good the past few years to lose 13 of their last 17 post-season games.

  192. SJ44 January 16th, 2008 at 1:04 pm

    Gil Patterson is one of most valuable coaches in the organization. He and Nardi Contreras work side by side with the young arms.

    He’s a quality person and has a great working knowledge of the biomechanics of pitching.

    He’s also one of the hardest working people in the game. He spends a ton of backfield time with the pitchers.

  193. S.o.S.27 January 16th, 2008 at 1:04 pm

    pat
    January 16th, 2008 at 12:50 pm
    SOS
    Didn’t see Jeter on ESPN but saw pics of him from Jorge’s Basebowl event from this weekend. I would believe he has worked out because he looks less puffy and more sculpted. Pics are on nyyfans.com, I think

    I see a big difference in him from last year at this time. When he was with Beil playing volleyball and a bit of a gut hanging out.

    As far as Cano and Melky. Hopefully they are still hanging out with Arod this winter. Doing his workout regime.I dont think anyone works harder in the offseason than he does. Maybe Melky will finally shed off all the baby fat and have a more lively bat this year. He did seem slimmer in the end of the year. Thats one good trait about Arod. He seems to make others around him work harder showing by example.

  194. Matt Schweber January 16th, 2008 at 1:05 pm

    Good example of the Yankees’ application of Moneyball to mine unsung, undervalued commodities.

    The Yankees’ discovery of Edwar Ramirez is a dramatic example.

    I think one of the stats guys “discovered” him. Ramirez, if I’m not mistaken, was playing semi-pro ball somewhere (one of those leagues Strawberry was confined to before Steinbrenner rehabilitated his career in ’96) Ramirez’ strike-out per inning ratio, evidently, was staggering. So the Yankees proceeded to sign him to a minor-league deal.

    If “Come,” as Jeter calls him, can add a few more mph to his fastball, learn to locate it better, or give it movement in the zone, that change-up of Come’s will be devastating.

    He showed a lot of promise this year. I hope he builds on it. I hate sentimentalism and even I thought Ramirez story was a heart-warming one.

    Gotta admire the perserverance of any player who refuses to give up, even after he’s been cut multiple times.

  195. randy l. January 16th, 2008 at 1:05 pm

    “BTW, Girardi and Cashman talk EVERY DAY. How do I know? Girardi told me when I spoke when we were on the same flight recently. He told me Cashman calls him everyday with updates as to what’s going on, things they want to do, etc.”

    things like this are one of the reasons i like this blog. where in the mainstream media would you get info like that?

    sj44-
    i have a friend who’s a professor at barry university who’s a die hard yankee fan and he’s run into girardi in a similar way. he also found girardi very approachable and gracious. nice to live in miami.

  196. Old Yanks Fan January 16th, 2008 at 1:06 pm

    Re the Yankees announcers, I think the Bill White, Scooter, Frank Messer (no one ever mentions him) group was the best.
    ———————————————————–
    Messer was a bit stiff, as was Bill White initially. The best group I can remember was Coleman, Rizzuto and Joe Garagiola. Very knowlegable group but FUNNY! and entertaining. However, the funniest guy in baseball has to be Bob Ucker. I love to listen to him to games for a year.

    IMO, for a baseball analyst to not like stats, is like a Social Srudies teacher not liking history. It’s funny how people can actual dislike, or fault, or disbelieve Stats.
    Stats are simply a historical record of many of the ways ballplayers have performed on the field. If I tell you its 70d outside, can you dislike that stat? Now some may think that it is too hot, some too cold, some just right. The key is how people interpret stats, and everyone does it differently. I can present some comprehensive stats on one ballplayer to 4 different GMs and get 4 different evaluations/opinions. Stats are inanimate. People make the interpratations and decisions.

    And stats only give you an average or total of what a guy has done before. It is not a prediction, but simply an educated guess at what he might do in the future.

    Great Blackjack players count cards. This does not guarantee they will win any one specific hand. But over the long run, keeping track of card ‘stats’ allows them to make better calculated guesses in the present.

    One stat that really helps is tracking where players tend to hit the ball. It’s what makes putting the shift on Ortiz and Giambi a good percentage move. Stats say these guys pull ground balls the majority of the time. This is a stat that many just know in their head from observation. But many stats need to be collected, saved and evaluated, as nobody can mentally track each player over a number of years.

    I personally wonder how comprehensively the Yankees database and analyze stats. This is absolutely critical for what they do. But more importantly is to have the personel that can intrepret various stats in such a way that they have the best odds of making good decisions.

    The prime example is for years, many interpreded stats in such a way as to value BA, HRs and RBIs. Most would now agree with Billy Bean that considering OBP and SLG is a better way to evaluate player performance.

  197. Old Yanks Fan January 16th, 2008 at 1:08 pm

    OYF: no, we werent refering to David Cone. Gary Cohen is SNY’s play-by-play man, and he’s much better at it than Michael Kay.
    ——————————————————-
    Sorry… I don’t follow that other NY team. What are they called again?

  198. Bob from NJ January 16th, 2008 at 1:11 pm

    Matt,

    The story about Edwar was picked up by Neyer and proclaimed as a victory for the statheads. I believe the report turned out be to incorrect, though. He was playing in a semi-pro league and was found by a scout, it turned out in the end. I think.

    ““Statistics found him,” Billy Eppler, the team’s director of professional scouting, said yesterday.”

    “Caradonna found Ramirez in the United League: 1.07 ERA, 46 strikeouts and 10 walks in 25 1/3 innings for Edinburg (Texas).”

    I think that report was later withdrawn, but I could be wrong.

  199. Old Yanks Fan January 16th, 2008 at 1:12 pm

    “Did anyone see Jeter on espn yesterday. I heard he was working out this winter and it showed. He didnt have the double chin action with puffed up cheeks. ”

    anyone think this is a coincidence and has nothing to do with Girardi’s hiring??
    —————————————————–
    To some extend, yes. But…
    anyone think this is a coincidence and has nothing to do with ARod getting a 10 year contract?

  200. S.o.S.27 January 16th, 2008 at 1:20 pm

    Can someone answer this question for me. Has Jeter always been slow going to his left? Or has it gradually happened through the years? The reason i ask is maybe shedding off some weight might make him more mobil. So the talks we have had about him moving to left,first or center are moot.

  201. pat January 16th, 2008 at 1:22 pm

    OYF
    That wouldn’t surprise me. Seeing the success that a slimmed down A-Rod had last year might also be motivating to some players too.

  202. Peter Abraham January 16th, 2008 at 1:29 pm

    Just for your information: Torre and Cashman spoke every day as well. Morning, pre-game and post-game. In fact, after home games they would usually talk as they drove home. This idea that Cashman will suddenly communicate with the manager is ridiculous.

    As is the idea that Jeter (or anybody else) will work out more because Girardi is the manager. Do you really think the manager of a team can order a veteran player to work out? It doesn’t work that way. They have a staff of conditioning guys who handle that stuff.

    Now Girardi is far more involved in development than Torre. That is true. But he’s not talking to Cashman or the players any more than Torre did.

  203. randy l. January 16th, 2008 at 1:29 pm

    ” I think that the next frontier is evaluating the health risks of young pitchers. Why do some pitchers experience arm trouble and some don’t? Workload, age, lefties vs. righties, body type, mechanics, etc. are all possible factors.”

    after moneyball gave away beane’s secrets, teams probably do keep any secret defensive metrics close to their vests. you may be right that the next frontier is developing young pitchers. i would also add prolonging the career of veteran pitchers to that. both things are really different sides of the same coin.

    i mean what’s the sense of safely developing a young pitcher if you can’t keep him healthy throughout his career? i personally believe that throwing is a very natural thing and generally the more the better. but it’ll take a lot of science to figure out how often, how much, and how hard.

    the whole questions about innings with kennedy, joba, and hughes is right on topic as far as the next frontier you’re talking about. i’m hoping the yankees know some of that new science of pitching that will bring out the best in them.

  204. i miss bernie January 16th, 2008 at 1:30 pm

    oyf
    yeah stats are great! some guy wrote how shilling is so good b/c of his 4. something k/bb ratio last season. but he was 9-8! my problem is that people get compared through a narrow look at one or two favorite stats.

    my point is that somebody can spend all day analyzing rickey’s stats but nobody should need any stats to know a hall of famer. he changed the game at the plate especially on the bases. stats are great, take em or leave em, ill choose to leave em.

    just like that other ny team. they play national league ball. some of us like national league ball, others don’t. knowlege of national league ball is essential to the running of an american league team. national league baseball, like stats, is great. take em or leave em.

  205. Old Yanks Fan January 16th, 2008 at 1:35 pm

    GreenBeret7 – When they start hiring and firing on the say so of computers, it’s time to quit.
    ———————————————————–
    When you are done picking Moose’s bones clean, please read my previous post. Computers/Stats DONT TELL anybody anything. They DON’T THINK. They just remember stuff and organize it, so it is easier for a human being to look at information in a way that is valuable to them.

    Would you be a better soldier if you had NO memory of previous battles? No memory of war history?

    A computer is simply a tool.
    A knife is simply a tool.
    In a surgeons hand, a knife can save lives and make life better.
    In a murderers hand, a knife can take lives and make life miserable.
    A knife is not good or bad. It’s just a knife. A tool.
    So think of a computer as a ‘fancy knife’.

    However, I, as a human being will make a value judgement.
    I do a lot of gardening, landscaping, gidding rocks, cutting some trees, etc.
    For a long time, I used 2 tools called a Shovel and a Wheelbarrow.
    Then I decided to hire a friend who had a tool called a Backhoe.
    My human judgement?: Backhoe >>> Shovel + Wheelbarrow.

  206. Matt Schweber January 16th, 2008 at 1:38 pm

    Interesting, Bob, thanks for the tip. The Man vs. the machine debate, it seems, never dies, does it?

    Something about Michael Lewis’ flattering portrait of Beane’s approach always has troubled me though.

    Bean’s approach struck me as visionary in some respects but still flawed, a compensatory mirror image of Beane’s failings as a player. Only now as a GM the same blind volatile rage animated an irrational hostility to the traditional, subjective analysis scouts perform.

    Beane extrapolated from his failed major-league career that stats measure player performance better than simple subjective human judgment because the scouts were so wrong about him. Whereas I might have drawn the opposite conclusion from Beane’s bio. Beane’s fatal flaw as a player, at least as Lewis characterized it, was never his athletic ability but his mercurial character. And personality is one of those inscrutable things that defy statistical measure, whatever the Minnesota MMPI and its successors may claim.

    Interesting debate. Let’s hope the Yankees continue to add the one without sacrificing the other.

  207. Old Yanks Fan January 16th, 2008 at 1:38 pm

    ‘loved pee wee reese in 1955′ >>> ‘Since about 84′.

  208. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 2:00 pm

    “As is the idea that Jeter (or anybody else) will work out more because Girardi is the manager. Do you really think the manager of a team can order a veteran player to work out? It doesn’t work that way. They have a staff of conditioning guys who handle that stuff.”

    well, we’ll see.

    all i have to go on is what we saw last April and what we will see this April.

    i have heard reports so far that Moose has re-dedicated himself to conditioning, Abreu has hired a personal trainer, Jeter is apparently working out harder than in the past, Hughes/Sanchez/Brackman have all reported early, etc.

    you’re right, i can’t say it is just b/c of Girardi, but i AM getting the sense of organizational change in this arena.

    i know you are uber-defensive when it comes to Torre, but it is hard to deny how much harder Girardi is working so far. it’s been night and day.

    whether that translates on the field, we don’t know yet. but the early returns on Mr. Girardi have been VERY positive.

  209. Matt Schweber January 16th, 2008 at 2:43 pm

    “i know you are uber-defensive when it comes to Torre, but it is hard to deny how much harder Girardi is working so far. it’s been night and day”

    Or are you overly critical of Torre? Perspective all depends on vantage point.

    Incidentally, how hard does Jim Leyland work? Don’t many consider him among the best managers in the game?

    Buzz Bissinger portrays Tony LaRussa as an incorrigible workaholic. So was Buck Showalter, according to Michael Kay.

    Nonetheless, given the choice between LaRussa/Showalter and Torre, I’d still select Torre to manage my team every time.

  210. pat January 16th, 2008 at 2:45 pm

    Moose and Abreau’s dedication might also have something to do with playing for contracts after this season.

    Some of the young ones always report early. I remember reading that Hughes bought his Tampa condo right after he was drafted so he could be near the minor league complex to start workouts right after Christmas and he mentioned some of the other players who were working out with him.

    I also remember seeing pics of Jeter and Cairo working out at the minor league complex before pitchers and catchers reported last year.

    I think Girardi is going to be a good manager but some of you sound like he might inspire players to re-invent the wheel and cure cancer just because he’s sitting in the dugout. Might be a good idea for him to accomplish something before the canonization.

  211. Jim from Dalton January 16th, 2008 at 2:55 pm

    ”The Yankees are taking away final say from Cashman, clearly the best baseball mind in the organization.”

    Did you really say that??

    Man…then we need a ‘new baseball mind’..where have you been the eight years or so?

    I still see Tony Womack in my nightmares…

    Geez, you guys really get excited over a handfull of minor leaguers who haven’t won a damn thing…

  212. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 2:57 pm

    “Moose and Abreau’s dedication might also have something to do with playing for contracts after this season.”

    except Abreu was playing for a contract last off season as well. he had a $16M option he wanted picked up.

    Jeter has 3 years left on his contract.

    so i don’t think it is that simple.

    and yes, we should hold off on the “canonization”. like i said, “we’ll see”.

    “Nonetheless, given the choice between LaRussa/Showalter and Torre, I’d still select Torre to manage my team every time.”

    yes, i know. i read your overwrought blog entry after they let him go.

  213. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 3:03 pm

    “I still see Tony Womack in my nightmares…”

    what does Tony Womack have to do with Brian Cashman??

  214. Matt Schweber January 16th, 2008 at 3:10 pm

    Oh, so that was you?

    “My overwrought blog entry?” I wonder which one. There are so many.

    But thanks, I appreciate the compliment of being read even by most vehement critics, especially when they belong to nomaas.

  215. Matt Schweber January 16th, 2008 at 3:11 pm

    Oh, so that was you?

    “My overwrought blog entry?” I wonder which one. There are so many.

    But thanks, I appreciate the compliment of being read even by most vehement critics, especially when they belong to nomore.

  216. Matt Schweber January 16th, 2008 at 3:11 pm

    Oh, so that was you?

    “My overwrought blog entry?” I wonder which one. There are so many.

    But thanks, I appreciate the compliment of being read even by most vehement critics, especially when the critic is affiliate with “no more.org”

  217. Matt Schweber January 16th, 2008 at 3:14 pm

    The Tampa “brain trust” signed Wommack, evidently, without Cashman’s consent or even his consultation.

    I’d like to believe Cashman never would been so foolish as to sign him.

  218. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 3:43 pm

    this one:

    http://theyankeesrepublic.blog.....bronx.html

    “The nausea has returned. Oh yes, after twelve years, it has reasserted itself, and with a vengeance.

    The pettiness and the effrontery. The insolence and the vindictiveness. The cowardice and the malice. The insanity and the embarassment. Yankeeland has resurrected the age-old revulsion.

    Four years after the tepid, disingenuous, eleventh-hour offer to Andy Pettitte that drove him to Houston; one year after refusing to extend the contract of their indispensable catcher, after declining to renew the contract of their immortal closer, after waiting until Spring Training to vouchsafe their still productive 16-year center-fielder a demeaning, non-guaranteed minor-league contract: Do these Little Men, after their affront to the manager Jorge Posada, Mariano Rivera, and Andy Pettitte consider a father figure, really believe their free agents will re-sign after the way they treated him– will re-sign simply because the Little Men are prepared to offer them prodigious sums of money. No, even after Andy Pettitte himself fled to Houston in 2003 for much less because the Yankees’ disrespected him, the Little Men upstairs, evidently, still haven’t learned their lesson.”

    come on, go back and read this entry. the Yankees changed their manager. they are a baseball team and they felt it was time to go with a new manager. that’s it. “revulsion”? really?

    i stand by my use of “overwrought”.

    the players obviously back my opinion, since everyone came back. guess they weren’t that nauseated.

  219. Doreen January 16th, 2008 at 3:54 pm

    On Randy l’s recommendation, I started to read Diamond Dollars. I really had a hard time following some of it, and I’m excusing that my saying I had too much on my plate at the time. But I am loathe to try it again. What I could follow was interesting, but a lot of numbers and graphs make my head spin. Maybe I wasn’t prepared enough for it. It’s been a l-o-o-o-n-g time since I read a textbook, and it was a little reminiscent of that. Still, I’ll try it again. Going to Florida next weekend, so I’ll bring it with me.

    I wonder if the slow start by the entire team last year has each of them thinking about getting off to a better start this season. The hiring of Girardi is probably coincidental. Whatever the reason, I’m glad that members of the team are motivated to show up on day one ready to go.

  220. Dave January 16th, 2008 at 4:42 pm

    Cash drafted Hughes before the 2004 but cash didnt gain power until his contract was renewed after 2005? You cant have it both ways. If so, Cash gets the blame for the ten or so major pitching blunders since then. Funny, how that was so conveniently left out. And where were the statistics to back the fact that he is THAT good of a GM? Besides our farm system getting much better (which didnt have much, if anything to do with the trades cash made last off-season) where are the trades and signings that make cash so brilliant in your eyes? That was a weak post- all opinions with nothing to back them up.

  221. Matt Schweber January 16th, 2008 at 4:52 pm

    Thanks Doreen, maybe I’ll try to purchase a used copy on Amazon then.

    Well, hmmn, that’s how I felt about it at the time. The decision disappointed me less the the manner in which the Yankees handled it enraged me. Evoking, as it did, all the anger, frustration, and yes, nausea, of the late 80′s-early 90′s, which if you’re old enough, I’m sure you can recall well enough to wish to forget.

    The decision looked more ominous than it turned out to be. Thank God. Hank is evidently wiser, more circumspect, rational, and self-aware than his Dad.

    Still, I thought Torre deserved better. If the Yankees wished to go in a different direction, they should have just announced as much. I also thought Torre merited something like Gene Michael received when he resigned. Some indefinite personal services contract or job in the broadcast booth.

    Had they done that and Torre spurned them, I certainly wouldn’t have lambasted them the way I did.

    All that drivel about failing to attain the mission statement the Yankees pandered bothered me as well. It made them appear petty, vindictive, and narcissistic, scapegoating Torre for failure the entire organization was responsible for.

    Did Torre’s mismanagement of the bullpen exasperate me at times? Of course.

    But look, I fundamentally like and admire the guy and probably identify with him far more than I should because it’s largely a projection.

    I’m still sorry he won’t be around anymore, at least not in the Bronx

  222. hmmm January 16th, 2008 at 5:05 pm

    “Evoking, as it did, all the anger, frustration, and yes, nausea, of the late 80’s-early 90’s, which if you’re old enough, I’m sure you can recall well enough to wish to forget.”

    yes, i am old enough to remember. i just never got that sense from the Torre situation. i have felt for 2-3 years that Torre’s best years were behind him, and that change was inevitable and probably best for BOTH parties (i still do).

    i agree it could have been handled a little better, but at no point did i experience “revulsion”. they made Torre a fair offer. he declined. in the end, Torre landed on his feet and the yankees kept all their free agents while bringing in the young, hungry manager they seemed to be needing these last few years.

    we saw things a little differently, that’s fine.

    Thanks for the reply Matt.

  223. Lebrons Shoes September 3rd, 2014 at 8:23 am

    Oil painting and propylene are the main means of photographic realism painting. Photographic realism painting originated in the 60′s . David was the government’s official painter of the French Revolution, revolution advocate and participant.

  224. Derrick Rose New Shoes September 3rd, 2014 at 6:48 pm

    The way an Indian saree adds to the beauty and grace of a woman is worth mentioning.

  225. Cheap Kevin Durant 5 Basketball Shoes September 10th, 2014 at 6:31 am

    Number one terms beneath designer stylish bring dozens of different types choices in handbags on females looking to stay in step in an new ways beneath designer fashion. Although these kinds of traces are usually always stylish modern, new grand handbag styles, these stylish designers usually bring the identical form of grade and also elegance that girlses contain improved to be able to anticipate. Along with his or her distinctive blend of mode, elegance and dazzle, girls would like to batch these types of famous reputation components.

  226. New Kobe Shoes September 10th, 2014 at 9:29 pm

    The Enzo Angiolini Xcite Sandals, Enzo Angiolini Jete Sandals, Enzo Angiolini Beehive Sandals, Enzo Angiolini Ea Myra Sandals and Enzo Angiolini Beatrixx Sandals are amongst the top-selling sandals from the brand.

  227. Air Max 2014 Shoes September 11th, 2014 at 11:07 am

    Mrs. Levine once said: mother always thought a fine pair of shoes was a necessity.

Leave a comment below


Sponsored by:
 

Search

    Advertisement

    Follow

    Mobile

    Read The LoHud Yankees Blog on the go by navigating to the blog on your smartphone or mobile device's browser. No apps or downloads are required.

Advertisement

Place an ad

Call (914) 694-3581