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A New York Yankees blog by Chad Jennings and the staff of The Journal News


It’s always about the money

Posted by: Peter Abraham - Posted in Misc on Mar 06, 2008 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

You have to hand it to Joba Chamberlain, he has the Nuke LaLoosh cliches down to a science.

Here’s what Joba had to say about the Yankees renewing his contract for $390,000:

“I don’t play the game to get paid. I play the game to enjoy it and love it. The paycheck’s a bonus. What do I have to complain about?”

Golly, that’s sweet. Some people even believed it.

What Joba didn’t mention is that a team renews a player’s contract only when that player refuses to sign a contract because he’s mad at the amount of money offered.

Oh, and Joba didn’t pitch in the minors for the Yankees in 2006 because he was holding out for a larger signing bonus after he was drafted. He ended up with $1.15 million. That was the most of any player in the supplemental first round and two players taken in the first round.

Don’t me wrong, Joba is a good kid and by all accounts he is generous with his money. He should get every dime he can from the Yankees. But spare us the “I don’t play for money” routine.

Two good rules of thumb to remember when you read sports stories: Injuries are always worse then what the team or athlete says and when somebody says it’s not about the money, it’s really, really about the money.

 
 

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78 Responses to “It’s always about the money”

  1. Andrea - anti-anti March 6th, 2008 at 8:58 pm

    I don’t think I get it…

  2. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Mission 2708 March 6th, 2008 at 9:00 pm

    SHOW ME DA MONEY!

    Ahem. Yeah. It’s always about the money, but given where Joba’s coming from, can you blame him?

    It’s like Athlete’s PR 101: Always say it’s not about the money.

  3. Brandon (Proud supporter of "Alex being Alex" ) (I slay the Anti) March 6th, 2008 at 9:04 pm

    just blame it on Arod :lol:

  4. Biaggio March 6th, 2008 at 9:07 pm

    As long as he pitches well he can say almost anything he wants. He does have the talent. What is noteworthy is that the Yankees did not pay him more.

    Joba is no Pavano.
    http://welovetheyankees.blogspot.com/

  5. SJ44 March 6th, 2008 at 9:08 pm

    Here would be my advice for Joba the rest of the spring.

    Just shut it down. Be polite with the media but stop talking.

    Its too much hype for a kid that has a lot of work to do to get ready for the season.

    Its a veteran team and he is good to know his place around the clubhouse.

    However, there comes a time when he should be seen and not heard. I think we are approaching that time with Joba.

    Just get prepared for the season and let your game do the talking.

    That’s the one thing that has impressed me about Hughes this spring. He’s just pitching, not talking.

    I know Joba is a popular guy. But, sometimes, you have to pull back a bit.

    I think that time is now.

  6. Derek - RETIRE 21!!!(please?) March 6th, 2008 at 9:10 pm

    Come on Pete… i know youre a knowledgable journalist and we should have the right to know when were being had, and i thank you, we all thank you, for letting us know those instances… but Joba IS a great kid and a little white lie like this doesnt necessarily need to be exposed to great lengths like that, as much as it CAN get annoying for us to treat the kid like the golden child, i just dont think that was information we really needed to know.

    Were happy he at least has the sense to say what he should about the situation other than the way Cole Hamels and The Prince of All Things Uppercut not-so-midly put things.

  7. anti-mussina March 6th, 2008 at 9:12 pm

    joba is fake just like arod, jeter, etc. are all fake.

  8. gayle March 6th, 2008 at 9:17 pm

    It may be all about the money but what I find refreshing is that unlike Prince Fielder and Cole Hamels JOba at least had the common sense or media savy to not trash the team for not giving him a bigger raise or complaining about the money he did get.

  9. frits March 6th, 2008 at 9:17 pm

    when i first started reading these i thought “aw, sour grapes”.

    but then i read the last line and i realized pete’s right.

    it’s ALWAYS about the money.

  10. dana March 6th, 2008 at 9:17 pm

    this is why if I were a professional athlete I would talk to the press as little as possible. Why bother?

  11. Jeff NJ March 6th, 2008 at 9:18 pm

    See Pete, articles like this bring out the trolls. Why can’t we have a feel good story that the money doesn’t matter to Joba? If it’s $390k or $450k it will still be the biggest paychecks he ever got in his life. Only thing I can think of is the paychecks are like a scorecard and the big egos want the bragging rights. But Joba, like Papelbon and all other young players have no control of their salaries pre-arbitration. Lesson learned for Joba.

  12. MikeEff - Shelley at First March 6th, 2008 at 9:20 pm

    thanks for setting us straight pete. we thought he was a good guy.

  13. SJ44 March 6th, 2008 at 9:26 pm

    Pete isn’t holding a referendum as to whether or not Joba is a good guy. By all accounts he is.

    The point is, it IS always about the money. Its what makes the game go ’round.

    Players talk about it. Fans talk about it. Management and ownership talks about it.

    If I was advising Joba, I wouldn’t even address it.

    Sometimes, in an effort to sound PC, you come across as phony.

    I don’t think that’s the case here with Joba. He, unlike Papelbon (who talked openly about why he was looking for more money), Joba doesn’t have the service time to talk about money.

    He will one day. Hopefully, his game will be such that when that time comes, he will get a record setting deal.

    But, until then, less should be more when discussing money right now.

  14. Tseng March 6th, 2008 at 9:27 pm

    Anti,

    And I bet those nipple rings are fake too!

  15. Joe from Long Island March 6th, 2008 at 9:27 pm

    Re: SJ44′s comment – Maybe this is the time for Moose, Andy, Mo, or someone else to have a chat with Joba. Not in a punitive or way to put-down someone who’s just finding their way. But to clue them in a little bit on professional behavior, in a helpful manner.

    I’ve never played beyond school yards, but professionalism in any line of work is a good thing. Sometimes, new personnel need a helping hand, in a mentoring sort of way, to learn that lesson.

  16. george March 6th, 2008 at 9:28 pm

    i have to chuckle at this one – a NY beat reporter upset that Joba is savvy enough to preempt a ‘bored beat writers’ controversy over some offhand remark he might make about wanting more dough.

    Bull Durham answers – a traditional way of keeping your name out of the papers.

  17. Cy Endfield March 6th, 2008 at 9:29 pm

    “Injuries are always worse then what the team or athlete says”

    Well, I guess Hidelki Matsui is out of action until at least after the All-Star Game.

  18. JK7742 March 6th, 2008 at 9:30 pm

    Good profile of Juan Miranda:

    http://tinyurl.com/2wxjyy

  19. J-Dawg--Veintisiete en '08, Chasing Greatness! March 6th, 2008 at 9:30 pm

    Situations like this are just a part of Joba’s learning experience as a player. When players are his age, not only do they learn about how to handle themselves in on-field situations, they learn about off the field situations as in what to do and what to say when the media is around. He may have volunteered a wee bit too much info, maybe not, depends on your view. One thing that he will learn is that it isn’t necessarily the best idea to go around talking about money at every opportunity. He didn’t say anything drastically wrong, he’s still learning, that’s all.

  20. Don Vito March 6th, 2008 at 9:34 pm

    Another FINE example of a member of the media making sure that a player of sports is held to the highest of all ethical and moral standards. Pete…I’ll bet 90% of your readers could have done without your opinion on this and I, for one, don’t think it was needed for you to point this out for us.

  21. #9 March 6th, 2008 at 9:35 pm

    “Injuries are always worse then what the team or athlete says”

    This is not so true in the game of soccer or as my Irish cousins call it “Football”…

    Faking an injury to get a foul call is an art in soccer – er – I mean football…

  22. Ben March 6th, 2008 at 9:35 pm

    Pete, you said something not nice about Joba. I’m not reading your blog anymore, until tomorrow.

  23. Derek - RETIRE 21!!!(please?) March 6th, 2008 at 9:35 pm

    sj44..

    i wasnt stating whether or not pete thought joba was a good guy or not… 1) he said so in the article already, 2) everyone loves the kid and rightfully so, tons of energy, well needed.

    As for what you said about less is more, 100% agree with you, and Phil Hughes has done an EXCELLENT job, but thats also not a question a reporter would ask Hughes and expect a quotable answer from, Joba is a firecracker and he’ll give you a smile and a good answer everytime you ask him to…

    But like i was trying to say, he shouldnt get a bad rap for the Nuke LaLoosh cliche, when you have guys like Jeter in the clubhouse to look up to, the easy way out of a tough question is to be as humble as possible. Which i think he did rather well, far better than his peers, whether its the truth or not, who cares?! I just dont think it shouldve been delved into as deep as it was. Like Jeff said, this stuff brings out the Trolls..

    Good Answer Joba. Keep up the good work.

  24. Tom March 6th, 2008 at 9:38 pm

    Wow, you caught a young naive kid in a little white lie. Congratulations.

  25. murphydog March 6th, 2008 at 9:40 pm

    Not to worry, Professor Posada will be tutoring Joba and IPK as needed all season in the manly art of strike-throwing. I just hope Joba and IPK learn enough espanol to understand that when Jorge refers to them as “Marty Cohen” and “Ben Dayho” it ain’t a compliment.

  26. Derek - RETIRE 21!!!(please?) March 6th, 2008 at 9:42 pm

    lol “marty cohen” and “ben dayho” hahahahaha that was much needed murph thanks for the chuckle

  27. SJ44 March 6th, 2008 at 9:48 pm

    Murph,

    LOL. Too funny.

    Overall, Joba didn’t commit a mortal sin or anything.

    Let’s remember though, he’s rookie on a veteran team.

    Less, not more Joba. Always a better way to go.

  28. murphydog March 6th, 2008 at 9:49 pm

    Tom:

    What makes you think Joba’s naive? Because he’s part native American? Because he’s talented?

    IMO, kids who rise to the top of a group of young, cutthroat competitive men aching to play MLB for the Yankees while scoring a $1.15 million bonus are likely to be anything but naive.

  29. pat March 6th, 2008 at 9:51 pm

    Rookie mistake on Joba’s part. Should have said, “I have nothing to complain about” and left it at that.

    Heard on the radio earlier that Papelbon signed for $775,000. The highest previous comparable was Mariano at $750,000 way back in the late 90′s.

    Based on the statements he made this week, I would venture to guess that the extra $25,000 was not an accident. It was an ego stroke so he could surpass Mo.

  30. murphydog March 6th, 2008 at 9:53 pm

    SJ:

    I’m sure Joba will be fine. Whatever he doesn’t pick up on his own, he will be taught by his teammates, coaches and manager. Sometimes it may seem like tough love but they appear to like him and want (and need) him to succeed. There will be any number of Dutch Uncles on that team to help him negotiate life inside and outside the white lines if he’s open to it.

  31. Derek - RETIRE 21!!!(please?) March 6th, 2008 at 9:53 pm

    ok my turn…

    Overall

    Pete didnt commit a mortal sin or anything either.

    Lets remember though, we are passionate fans who love our fiery youngsters.

    Less is More works with both players AND the media. Definately a better way to go.

    :o )

  32. whoa March 6th, 2008 at 9:55 pm

    That’s the George Young line, but I give Joba credit. He knows that he pays an agent to complain about money issues. He just plays the game.

  33. SJ44 March 6th, 2008 at 9:58 pm

    If folks are going to get angry anytime a player is rebuked a bit by Pete, you are in a for a long season.

    Nobody, not even Joba, is immune to criticism. However light it was.

    Murph,

    I agree. I think Joba, and the rest of the younger players, will be fine.

    The veteran players do a good job policing themselves from within on these things.

    One of the guys who does it better than most…….Moose.

    Moose and Jeter are probably the two guys who do it more than anybody in the clubhouse. They handle young players quite well.

  34. Peter Abraham March 6th, 2008 at 10:03 pm

    I wrote – on purpose – “don’t me wrong, Joba is a great kid” and of course, so many people got me wrong.

    I didn’t say he was a bad guy. I just find it funny that a 22-year-old is already in full cliche mode. Hughes and Kennedy just say what they think, they don’t give Hardy Boys answers. Joba will figure out once he realizes he looks silly.

    George: Yeah, he put one over on us. Most of us rolled our eyes and didn’t use it.

    Tom: I didn’t say he was lying. I’m just pointing out how silly the comment was.

    Don Vito: The day I start thinking like you is the day I quit. You must have been one of those male cheerleaders.

    I like Joba and enjoy talking to him 1-on-1. But when there are a group of people around him, he becomes Nuke LaLoosh. Listen to that tape of questions we did with Hughes for comparison. And Phil didn’t go to college.

    I’m not saying he’s a bad kid by any stretch. In fact, he’s a good kid. He just needs to say what he thinks, not what he thinks people want to hear. I’m sure some of you head-in-the-sand types want 15 years of cliches. I’d rather hear what the guy really thinks.

    It has served Jorge Posada well. Mike Mussina, too. Joe Girardi as well.

  35. terry March 6th, 2008 at 10:06 pm

    Way to take a cheap shot at Joba, Pete. Youre a real hero.

  36. murphydog March 6th, 2008 at 10:07 pm

    One more and I’m done…

    Once Joba ventures out into the media with a statement on the record he is implicitly agreeing to the Terms of Service: “If you comment to the press on the record, you relinquish control over those words and we reserve the right to comment on your comment as we see fit, in a blog, in a column, in a podcast, on (shudder) ESPN.”

    Them’s the rules.

  37. gayle March 6th, 2008 at 10:07 pm

    ok another issues with a young pitcher Noah Lowery has Exertion compartmental syndrome whatever the heck that is and needs surgery will miss at least a month.

    Once again the fragility of pitchers

  38. Derek - RETIRE 21!!!(please?) March 6th, 2008 at 10:07 pm

    Ohhhh SJ44 relax, no ones angry, and im not gonna contest everything pete says about a player thats not packed with ice cream and fudge…

    criticism is great, and like i said we thank pete for his insight and letting us know when things arent what they seem. we have the right to know the truth, i just think, and it shows im definately not alone on this… that it didnt need to be said in this particular case, and its just gonna make faces turn sour.

    youre definately right tho hahaha whats great is the way jete handles the media is actually funny now… you know just what hes gonna say, and if its kim jones asking the question, hell look at her with that “come on babe you KNOW im not givin it up that easy…” look. hahaha

  39. Sandy March 6th, 2008 at 10:08 pm

    Are there any accountants here to tell me what Paps new pay of 775,000 is compared to Mo’s 750,000 in 1998? It seems everyones forgetting the inflation part of this. I still think Mo is #1 on this one. In fact, I know he is :)

  40. Nick March 6th, 2008 at 10:08 pm

    Joba will pull back and also get good advice from teammates that know which of the media is likely to bait him.
    He’ll never be accused of conducting himself un-major league like such as a certain goof that pitches for a team 200 miles north on I-95.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uu43lbTrvOQ

  41. SJ44 March 6th, 2008 at 10:09 pm

    Its the one thing about Jeter I wished he would have re-considered way back when.

    Talks too much like MJ.

    Great player, talks a lot, says nothing.

    There is so much DJ could say about the game, how he prepares, in game strategy, issues surrounding the game, etc.

    But, like Tiger Woods, he listened to MJ and took a different path.

    Doesn’t make him a bad guy or anything of the sort.

    Just wish he opened up a little more with the fans and media because he has a lot of interesting things to say.

  42. mel March 6th, 2008 at 10:15 pm

    Are people here actually persecuting Joba for putting on a good face? I’d much rather him give a canned, cliche comment than say, “Hell yeah, I’m pissed. I want to be the standard bearer for those who are given the opportunity to meteorically rise through the system and actually help the club contrary to expectations. I’m also pissed that the clock on my service time was started earlier than planned.”

    I’d rather have it the Yankee way than this from Papelbon http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/.....id=3280428:

    He said he wanted to set a salary standard for future outstanding closers.

    “I feel a certain obligation not only to myself and my family to make the money that I deserve but for the game of baseball,” he said Tuesday. “Mariano Rivera has been doing it for the past 10 years and with me coming up behind him I feel a certain obligation to do the same.” Wha?!

  43. Jane March 6th, 2008 at 10:19 pm

    Since very few plan on defending Joba, let me try this- while he may be gone overboard with the “I don’t play for money”, he didn’t go to the press complaining that he should be paid more. What was left out of that quote (I don’t know if conveniently) he ended it by saying “What do I have to complain for?”

    No I don’t believe he should just say what’s in his mind because Joba will be killed in the press even more if he did. He did nothing wrong. I’d take hearing cliches any day than him acting like a spoiled kid. That’s just me.

  44. LA Yanks Fan March 6th, 2008 at 10:21 pm

    Did anybody see this about Edgar Martinez?

    http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/.....NHeadlines

    The last paragraph of this story about the Papelbon signing mentions that the Sox agreed to terms with Edgar Martinez with a link to:

    http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/.....atsId=4135

    Is that link correct or do they have another guy name Edgar Martinez?

  45. CB March 6th, 2008 at 10:26 pm

    I think this is a non-issue on either side.

    Joba spouted off some truisms. Pete has the right to voice his opinion.

    Let’s not idealize Joba here. I don’t think anyone doubts that he’s committed to the game and has a strong desire to excel at it.

    If he makes a lot of money doing it I’m happy for him.

  46. pat March 6th, 2008 at 10:26 pm

    Mel

    Joe Nathan’s response when told about Papelbon’s comments about trying to be the standard bearer for closers were great.

    http://www.bostonherald.com/sp.....position=2

  47. murphydog March 6th, 2008 at 10:29 pm

    SJ:

    Jeter is saving it all for his inspirational, post-retirement book so you have to pay to hear it :)

  48. Bob March 6th, 2008 at 10:31 pm

    Don’t care what they say, just how they play.

    Unless it’s a Red Sox and they say something stupid, than it’s fine by me to ridicule and trash them. :)

  49. CB March 6th, 2008 at 10:34 pm

    I think it’s now dawning on Papelbon what his decision to go back to the pen last year is going to cost him over the course of his career.

    He was in the rotation last year – and supposedly volunteered to go back to the closer’s role.

    People inside baseball at the time sort of shrugged their heads because they knew what the financial implications would be.

    But Papelbon wanted to pull his cap over his eyes and give hitters spooky eyes in the ninth.

    Sounds like buyers remorse now that he sees that Carlos Silva will make 20% more than Billy Wagner.

    He may have cost himself $70-100 million over the course of his career.

    He was a starter in college and in the minors. People said he had a full repetoire of pitches.

    Now he’s got some buyer’s remorse.

  50. JDnotDrew March 6th, 2008 at 10:36 pm

    “It wasn’t about the money or fame or records. ” – Brett Favre.

  51. MikeEff - Shelley at First March 6th, 2008 at 10:42 pm

    “I’m not saying he’s a bad kid by any stretch. In fact, he’s a good kid. He just needs to say what he thinks, not what he thinks people want to hear. I’m sure some of you head-in-the-sand types want 15 years of cliches. I’d rather hear what the guy really thinks.”

    and pete how do we know that he wasn’t saying what he thinks…maybe he was raised by less cynical people than you are accustomed to.

    it’s possible.

  52. whozat March 6th, 2008 at 10:56 pm

    “and pete how do we know that he wasn’t saying what he thinks…maybe he was raised by less cynical people than you are accustomed to.”

    Because, by the Yanks renewing Joba, we know that he was offered more dollars than he got, and that he turned it down.

    Unless you think that they offered him more and it’s SO MUCH not about the money that he turned it down in favor of a smaller salary.

  53. randyhater March 6th, 2008 at 11:12 pm

    So if Joba says he’s not mad about the lowball deal he’s a phoney, if he says he is mad he’s a greedy a-hole, and if he says nothing he’s an uncooperative jerk. How does he win, exactly?

    The thing I like most about Derek Jeter is that he doesn’t unpack his heart like a whore for the world to see. There was a time in our country when a man was expected to keep his own counsel, and his private thoughts private. More of that is what we need, from our ballplayers and otherwise, not less.

    As to Posada, when has he ever spilled his guts in the papers? He’s at least as bland as Jeter and never gives his real opinion on any subject. For instance does anyone really believe he’s happy with Pettitte ratting out their mutual friend and teammmate, Clemens? Of course he’s not. But he knows Pettitte’s an important part of the team, he has his eye on the prize (where it belongs), and so he toes the company line and holds his tongue. That’s professionalism.

    I agree with those who say Joba needs to throttle down a little. But to me that means saying less, not being more “honest.”

  54. born today March 6th, 2008 at 11:26 pm

    I can see Joba’s point. Sure, no fool is going to believe that money plays NO factor, but the kid can feel blessed, want the biggest paycheck if it’s available and be genuine in saying the money is secondary to his love of the game. What is so misleading about that? I’d proffer, me. Abe, what made you go with this post? Would you have pulled the critique trigger on your N
    BFF Phil Franchise? Has Joba’s happy little Native-American routine gotten too thick for the beat guys to stand?

  55. randyhater March 6th, 2008 at 11:29 pm

    cb,

    On papelbon, I think you’re assuming a lot if you think all that fist-pumping and trash-talking necessarily translates into 32 starts and 200 innings worth of similar success.

    Sure, he might have been Josh Beckett circa ’07 if he’d have been in the rotation all year. He also might have been Josh Beckett circa ’06. Or Kerry Wood circa ’06.

    To me the guy’s about the best at what he’s doing and should probably be happy with what he’s getting, and will get. Time will tell though.

  56. KurticusMaximus March 6th, 2008 at 11:30 pm

    I gotta say, I love the blog, but sometimes it sounds like you’ve been doing this a little too long, Pete, and are a little too sore about all the PR nonsense that surrounds everything.

    Between a post about Joba saying what just about every athlete ever has said about money when asked, and all the complaining about the Clemens nonsense, it just seems like you could use a break from this business. You’re sounding not too far from becoming the angry guy bemoaning the loss of the good ole days.

    I’m sure there are some athletes, few and far between though they may be, who don’t succumb to the PR mumbo-jumbo, but it’s a bit late in the game to complain about the ones who do. Cliches may be tired, but they’re a hell of a lot safer than “saying what you really think,” especially when saying what you really think is almost guaranteed to be twisted by the same PR machine you’re complaining about.

    Girardi and Hughes may be doing an okay job getting by and saying what they really think, but Jeter has become a superstar because he says nothing but cliches. And when the list of “straight-talking” athletes villainized in the media and by fans because of what they say is so long, you can’t really blame the new kids who choose the safe cliches over the risky honesty.

  57. Clare March 6th, 2008 at 11:34 pm

    I wrote a comment a while ago that hasn’t appeared yet.

    Basically I can’t believe that Peter actually wrote that Joba should say what he really thinks. Peter would be the first to rip Joba if, in fact, he was mad about the money and said so publicly. As noted above, it’s literally a can’t win situation.

    Also, I think this is part of a knee-jerk reaction on the part of some of the media, to build someone up, and then look for ways to tear him down. The media had nothing but good things to say about Joba last year. I predict this year will be different.

  58. Nettles Punched Bill Lee March 6th, 2008 at 11:37 pm

    Pete mixing it up with the rest of us here!!

    I like it.

    Good for you Pete.

    Best blog on the internet highway!!!

  59. Greg Cohen March 6th, 2008 at 11:58 pm

    Pete,

    I don’t think it’s about me, or you, or anyone, believing what he says, but the fact that he said what he said, that’s where I commend him. He said the “right” thing, whether it was true or not. Kinda like Derek “the most boring interview in the world” Jeter. Now, it may not make for a great story, which hurts you guys, but for the fans, this is all you can ask for. And I’d rather a player pretend it’s not about the money than take the Prince Fielder/Cole Hamels/Jon Papelbon arrogant a-hole route.

    Just my 2 cents, keep up the great work Pete, you always get people talking.

    Greg

  60. Derek - RETIRE 21!!! (Please?!) March 7th, 2008 at 1:27 am

    haha greg said EXACTLY what i said… see a pattern here people? even the people who scrolled past all this has the same concept of the situation…

  61. Greg Cohen March 7th, 2008 at 3:37 am

    Derek, sorry, didn’t see your post, but yes we did say pretty much the same thing.

  62. Joner March 7th, 2008 at 6:26 am

    The bottom line is, in a world where as Pete says, it’s all about the money, do you want your star to react like Papelbon did, openly doing the bidding of the MLPA or do you want your star to react like Joba and give a generic yet humble answer? I can’t get mad at the kid for doing the latter but it sounds like the beat bums are.

  63. Kevin P March 7th, 2008 at 6:53 am

    I’m confused over this whole “he wouldn’t sign, so the Yankees renewed him”.

    So Joba is now a FREE AGENT after this year? I thought a young player makes the league minimum for a few years before they are eligible for anything extra. And if they get anything extra for doing a good job it’s based on the team rewarding them (to keep them happy).

    What were the other options for the Yankees and Joba?

    And what is the contract length/status for Melky and Hughes? They are making more than the minimum salary, but how did that constitute them “signing” ?

    Color me clueless on this whole process.

  64. Peter Abraham March 7th, 2008 at 6:54 am

    It’s so cute that some of you believe what he said. Hope the Easter Bunny brings you lots of candy.

    As for how Joba can win, it’s quite easy. He can say what he thinks about being a dope like Pabelbon. Everybody knows he has no leverage and he didn’t sign just to make a point. That’s fine. Wang did it last year. Players do it all the time.

    And while Selig did hold up his draft deal, it was only because Joba wouldn’t sign for slot money. If he really doesn’t play for money, he would have accepted what the Yankees offered him on June 10 and reported to Tampa. He didn’t.

    Again, good for him. I think he deserves every penny. But of course he plays for money. I love my job but I wouldn’t do it for free.

    Clare: You know what I would write? Really? If Joba had said what he thought, it would have been far more interesting to me and to smart, realistic fans and I would have presented it as such. Why would I have criticized that? What he actually said was useless because it was so silly.

  65. Peter Abraham March 7th, 2008 at 8:08 am

    Kevin: Joba belongs to the Yankees for 5 more years. he was renewed because he wouldn’t sign. It’s just a technicality.

  66. Gerry March 7th, 2008 at 8:28 am

    Come On People!!! Why is Joba even a topic??? This kid has yet to pitch 50 innings at the major league level. He barely has a year of minor league ball behind him. Can’t anyone but me see that this kid pitched well against batters not familiar with him, had his outtings selectively chosen so that batters did not get a lot of exposure against him? The proof will be in the pudding, once the league gets a second look at him and a chance to adapt. Then we will see what the kid is made of, REALLY! Until then, chalk his success up to being a pleasant anomally and require futher evidence before instating him as a baseball god. Why are Yankee fans always so eager to hand out super star status without making the player earn it first? Is NY really that hard up for heros?

  67. TomTom March 7th, 2008 at 8:28 am

    Man you people think he is a god give the kid a couple of more innings and make something out of him before you make him out to be a “god”……in other words get off his D**k.

  68. TomTom March 7th, 2008 at 8:35 am

    Just take a look at Felix hernandez from the Mariners is waaaaaayy better than Joba, or Francisco Liriano he is 2x way better and they have not come threw like people thought they would well maybe Francisco has but come on people. It feels like people dont have to proob themselves anymore they come out of no where and they instantly stars. Trust I”m not hating at all he is good,and I hope will be a better pitcher in the futter for the sake of the yankees. But i’m going to give him a couple of more games before I declare him “something out of the ordinary”.

  69. TomTom March 7th, 2008 at 8:38 am

    And pete I do Appreciate you bringing is out. YOu are a sports wirter and one of the best because you dont always say what certain individuals like to hear. But you say the hard truth, but respectfully.

  70. Jax March 7th, 2008 at 9:01 am

    Gerry good points. It’s not a given he’s going to be a great reliever or closer for that matter. Many people are saying that. He only pitched 24 innings at the major league level. But they where 24 coddled innings. He always came in maybe with an exception of 1 or 2 times with no one on base. He had 2,3 and sometimes 4 days off. Joba has yet to prove he can even pitch 3 and sometimes 4 days in a row without losing any of his stuff. Which is what a closer/reliever is asked to do daily. I can’t believe many fans are anointing him the next great thing when truth is he has A LOT more to prove.

  71. Jon March 7th, 2008 at 10:11 am

    While of course the money (over the course of his career) matters, jumping to the conclusion that his 2008 salary really matters to him might be a stretch. I agree that he was sugar-coating it, but what I think he meant was “Hey, what’s the most they reasonably could have given me for 2008? $430K? What’s the difference? I love the game, I want to play, and I already got a $1M+ signing bonus. An extra $40,000 is going to make no difference to me this year.”

    “If he really doesn’t play for money, he would have accepted what the Yankees offered him on June 10 and reported to Tampa. He didn’t.”

    Comparing this to his bonus negotiations is so completely wrong I’m shocked you’d do it. Coming out of college there is no guarantee of ANY future money (other than a meager minor league salary). He had injury issues and knew that making the majors was FAR from a sure thing, as unliklely as that possibility seems in hindsight. Getting the highest bonus possible should be the most important thing for any amateur player – and rightly so. It may be the only money they EVER earn as a professional.

    You’re jumping to the conclusion that he’s lying about what he thinks of his 2008 salary because he wanted as large a signing bonus as possible. That’s ludicrous – you’re comparing apples and oranges.

  72. KevinP March 7th, 2008 at 10:37 am

    Pete,

    Oh, okay. So a player can refuse to sign, even though he has no power, yet demand more money. The team can bow to his wishes or give him a slight raise OR just pay him the minimum obligation.

    Is that a correct statement?

    If so, I assume the reason why the Yankees did not give him more was probably:

    - he only pitched 24 big league innings last year
    - he held out for money $$$ previously, this is the team’s turn to kinda recoup the extra amount they paid out previously

  73. Kristin March 7th, 2008 at 11:13 am

    This may have been said already, but it bears repeating. The rest of us don’t do a job where one day could end our career completely. I don’t think people really get this through their heads when thinking about athletes. Also, their agents know this is the case and push them not to sign things.

    Joba has a right to think he deserves more, just like I do when I walk into my boss’s office to ask for a raise after having performed well. I think it’s hypocritical of you to post one day with “he didn’t receive one cent more for what he did last year” outrage, and then turn around and say he’s a money-grubbing liar.

    You’ve been telling us all this time how much he loves the organization and would empty trash baskets to help the team, and how he was cleaning toilets at the public rec facilities in his hometown just four or five years ago. Now you’re going to say that he’s being fake? Shame on you for exploiting his feel-good story and then turning around on him as soon as he wants to feel secure and have the money to support his son and his disabled father in a way his family was never able to before.

  74. Johnny March 7th, 2008 at 11:22 am

    Very classy Pete..you must feel very proud of that.

  75. Greg March 7th, 2008 at 11:25 am

    Saying he “held out” after being drafted seems like it’s really misstating the situation… wasn’t he going to go play his senior year at Nebraska and try to improve his draft status (since he didn’t have a great junior year? You make it sound like he was going to hold out and sit at home pouting (or go pitch for the St. Paul Saints)…

  76. hmmm March 7th, 2008 at 11:48 am

    what a terrible thread.

  77. Joba Homer March 7th, 2008 at 4:31 pm

    Joba is a good hearted person and came from NOTHING to a person like that 350 thousand dollars is a huge deal as it would be for me as well, I honestly believe that the money is not a huge deal to him.

  78. Brian March 7th, 2008 at 5:08 pm

    He said exactly what he is suppose to say, if he didn’t he would look exactly like Jonathon Paplebon does now, an egotistic penny pincher.


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