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A New York Yankees blog by Chad Jennings and the staff of The Journal News


Tabata returns from suspension

Posted by: Peter Abraham - Posted in Misc on May 03, 2008 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

Have this going in the paper tomorrow. I’m sure some of you have heard the news already.

Double-A outfielder Jose Tabata, considered one of the organization’s top prospects, was suspended for three games last week and considered asking the Yankees for his release before returning to the team.

A 19-year-old from Venezuela, Tabata left last Saturday’s game without permission, fleeing the ballpark after striking out in the seventh inning. That led to a three-game suspension.

Tabata is hitting .186 with no home runs and 12 RBI over 26 games for Trenton.

“The expectations of who I am supposed to be and what I am supposed to do finally got to me,” Tabata told The Trenton Times through a translator. “I made an irrational decision. Maybe it was immaturity, inexperience or just that I didn’t know how to handle what was happening. I just kept thinking I am not producing the way I should be and maybe I didn’t belong here.”

Tabata was No. 37 on Baseball America’s list of the top 100 prospects in the game before the season started.

“I just felt like I had to go,” Tabata said. “It was a rash decision. … I thought about it a little and realized I am not a quitter.”

I spoke to Brian Cashman about the situation. He supported the decision to suspend Tabata. He believes it came out of frustration.

Obviously, it’s a setback in Tabata’s development. Double-A is a make-of-break level for a lot of players. Tabata will get every chance with the Yankees, but it’s premature to expect him in the majors any time soon, if ever.

 
 

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81 Responses to “Tabata returns from suspension”

  1. Arch May 4th, 2008 at 12:04 am

    Come on Jose!
    everybody struggles, don’t quit the Yanks.

  2. MikeEff -Protect Shelley's Quad May 4th, 2008 at 12:09 am

    he should have been given a worse punishment than 3 games. what a little brat!

  3. zeebak May 4th, 2008 at 12:12 am

    I remember reading a scouting report on him last year and they compared him to a young Manny Ramirez..so I guess this is Jose being Jose..

  4. mel May 4th, 2008 at 12:15 am

    He considered asking for a release? Did he reconsider and recommit to the Yankees?

  5. YankeesTech May 4th, 2008 at 12:19 am

    Jose, If you have that kind of attitude then you should quit. You shouldn’t care what people expect out of you. You should care about what you expect out of yourself.

  6. anonymousfan May 4th, 2008 at 12:21 am

    What concerns me the most, is that he had such an extreme reaction to only one month of struggles. As we all know, there is a lot of pressure involved with playing for the Yankees. Part of proving that you’re ready to play in NY, is showing that you’ll be able to handle adversity. Running away in the middle of a game and thinking of quitting after a bad month suggests that he’s nowhere near ready for the bright lights of NY.

    The good thing is Tabata is just a kid, and hopefully he’ll grow from the adversity he is facing now. Hopefully his performance will come around (and he’s starting to show some signs), and he will learn that he can overcome similar rough patches in the future.

  7. henner May 4th, 2008 at 12:28 am

    unfortunate turn of events for a good young talent. baseball is different from sports like football and basketball (lets go bugs!) in that theres no immediate praise for young players. hopefully hell work through this distraction and slump and continue his growth because, by many accounts, he is a big leaguer in waiting

    good luck jose

  8. Nate May 4th, 2008 at 12:33 am

    Hey, cut the kid some slack guys. Tabata’s 19 years old playing a man’s game. One day in his shoes and you’d all be home crying and asking out. Playing professional baseball is not easy for anyone and certainly not a teenager who doesn’t speak English.

    Calling him a brat and saying he should quit after one incident like this is ridiculous. You were also probably the same people calling for Damon’s release and Moose’s funeral. Be patient and cut the kid some slack. He was punished sufficiently for his actions and will hopefully turn his focus back to getting better.

  9. rvajames May 4th, 2008 at 12:34 am

    Let’s hope he can get himself straightened out, maybe this is due to off field issues as well and the bad performances as of late sent him over? He’s still only 19 so there’s only so much to expect until he goes farther up the farm system, anything more I would think is a bit much for such a young guy.

    It is concerning that if he can’t handle Double-A how can we expect him to hold up to one month in the Bronx? Let’s wait and see how Tabata handles this.

  10. Dougko May 4th, 2008 at 12:35 am

    Two words, “Mickey Mantle”. Mantle had a moment when he too decided that he should quit while having trouble in the minors. His dad went to pick him up and told him that he was going to go home and work in the mines. Mickey faced himself, decided not to quit, and went on to be, well… Mickey Mantle.

    Let’s hope Jose has a similar moment and career.

  11. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 7) May 4th, 2008 at 12:39 am

    “Betsy
    May 3rd, 2008 at 11:53 pm
    Brandon, I’m sorry for going off on you like that – we just had a misunderstanding.

    I appreciate your filling me in on Jose’s background and no – I can’t imagine what it must be like for a baby like he is to carry the hopes and dreams of his family on this back (maybe the hopes and dreams of his whole town). I didn’t consider how big of a deal it is for him as a Latino because I don’t judge people on their race or ethnicity; therefore, I never considered treating Jose any differently than I would anyone else. If Phil had done what he did, I would have been very disappointed. However, knowing what I know now, I have to say that it sure appears that I jumped the gun on him without knowing the pressures that are burdening his young shoulders. I hope he’s going to be ok and I hope the Yankees understand what the kid is going through. Jose also needs to understand that slumps happen and he’s going to be ok, but then – I can understand why he’d be afraid that he might not be. When you’re mired in a terrible slump and you are not a veteran with a proven track record, it’s easy to think that this is all there is – that you just can’t hack it at the highest levels. Then, the fear comes, the fear of your dream dying.

    If Jose is really a decent kid, I’ll be rooting hard for him.”

    Betsy that’s exactly what it is for him. It’s hard to explain because if Hughes were to struggle, remember he still has a signing bonus, if something were to happen to Joba he had a signing bonus too, Tabata doesn’t have much security. I just hope people understand that’s how it is for most prospects, this is just one story of many especially w/ the latin ballplayer.

    Anonymous Fan, sometimes it’s more than just your reputation, in this case Tabata had to do something or else he’d stay same mono-tone, lifeless nonreactionary, sometimes that’s not good. Atleast we know he cares that much, think about it if this kid were to ask for his release he would have left baseball entirely, he’s not from the United States , baseball and his family is his life, just like it was Sosa’s just like it is Manny’s.

  12. Ryan May 4th, 2008 at 12:42 am

    Speaking of struggling in the Minors, what’s Eric Duncan up to?

  13. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 7) May 4th, 2008 at 12:43 am

    showing life Ryan, showing life in the bat.

  14. Hey May 4th, 2008 at 12:46 am

    Nate, give me a break, he’s 19 years old. You are making it seem like he’s a 13 year old this boy. 19 year olds shouldn’t be having the type of tantrum he had. That being said, Tabata is too good of a hitter, even at his age, to be struggling with a batting average under the Mendoza line for much longer.

  15. Marc Pagnotti May 4th, 2008 at 12:47 am

    I seem to remember some shortstop in our system in the early 90′s, I believe he was right around 19 years old at the time, who contemplated asking the Yankees for his release and wanted to quit.

    His name, you ask? Oh yeah, Derek Jeter

  16. jay destro May 4th, 2008 at 12:49 am

    Eric Duncan is in Scranton, continuing to underachieve

  17. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 7) May 4th, 2008 at 12:49 am

    “Jose, If you have that kind of attitude then you should quit.”

    he showed emotion for the first time in his minor league career at 19 yrs., he played last season w/ injuries when he could have gotten surgery.

    “You shouldn’t care what people expect out of you. You should care about what you expect out of yourself.”

    in Venezuela he’s looked at as the next big star, drew comparisons to Miguel Cabrera and Manny Ramirez, his mom, dad, half his family is back there rooting for him, what do you mean he shouldn’t care, he’s trying to reach his dream and has finally hit a point in his life where he will be tested more than he ever has.

  18. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 7) May 4th, 2008 at 12:51 am

    Eric Duncan is in Scranton, continuing to underachieve

    .333 in his last 10 games and had a PH 2 RBI 7th inning single yesterday.

  19. anonymousfan May 4th, 2008 at 12:57 am

    Brandon,

    I don’t know…I really don’t see how this helps Tabata at all.

    There are much better ways to show you care than to do what he did. In my opinion, his actions were impulsive and show that he might not be able to handle adversity very well. If he needed to vent, that’s totally understandable…but he shouldn’t have just left in the middle of the game.

    And I DO think reputation is important…for everyone, not just baseball players. This is why they talk so much about “makeup” when discussing prospects.

    Please don’t take this the wrong way…I’m not ripping Tabata. I just don’t think what he did was a positive moment in his career. I admire him for facing his teammates and the media and acknowledging his mistake. Hopefully it was just an isolated incident and he can move forward.

  20. jonathan May 4th, 2008 at 1:04 am

    I think everyone reaches a “crisis mode” in their life where it becomes almost too much to deal with. even though i am 34 now i reached mine post college when i had no clue what do do. We as fans need to support jose and let him know that he is a yankee and that he will be just fine!
    He became a top prospect for a reason and will succeed. Derek Jeter talks of when he was in rookie ball how he wanted to give up but didnt and i think the same thing will happen with jose tabata.

  21. rvajames May 4th, 2008 at 1:14 am

    Hey – Do you remember when you’re 19? It’s a hard time for anyone with changing from a kid to supporting yourself, and this is the prime years when mental illness becomes prevalent (not saying Jose has anything, but that it’s a tough time emotionally). I know 40-year-olds that still act like they’re 21 and 21-year-olds that act like they’re 40. Let’s hope Jose can learn from it, find out why he’s so upset, and fix these issues positively.

  22. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Mission 2708 May 4th, 2008 at 1:15 am

    I had frustration much worse than that just doing my senior thesis.

    Tabata is young, he’s not a 35 year old veteran. These are the types of experiences you learn from the most, much more than any lesson any baseball instructor can give.

    Better he learns the hard way now than later, when there’s a $15 million contract or whatnot.

  23. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Mission 2708 May 4th, 2008 at 1:19 am

    Brandon: You could do some serious writing on what the Latin players go through…and I would, for one, be very interested in reading it.

  24. anonymousfan May 4th, 2008 at 1:25 am

    I agree. If he learns from this and moves forward, he’ll be just fine and everyone will forget this even happened (just like Mantle and Jeter)

    I’ll even go one step further and say that his story has the potential to one day be an inspiration for others who might be facing similar struggles….”I hit rock bottom, I stuck with it, and now I’m an MLB star etc etc….”

    It’s all about the rebound :-)

  25. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 7) May 4th, 2008 at 1:27 am

    I may just infact do that Rebecca, maybe sometime this month.

  26. kenny May 4th, 2008 at 1:31 am

    Nice, I knew someone would bring up the Mantle reference. That’s the first thing that popped into my head too. Not to say Tabata will ever get near Mantle or even get to the majors, but there are many similarities….teenager pegged as next superstar contemplates quitting Yankees, etc.

  27. David May 4th, 2008 at 1:32 am

    Wow if Robinson Cano had that attitude he would have jumped off a bridge a week ago…

  28. jay destro May 4th, 2008 at 1:35 am

    re: eric duncan. He went unclaimed in the rule 5 draft. He was a first round pick and once the darling of the thin farm system. He is nearing the end of his minors service and could be a potential minor league free agent. His current little streak is not representative if his complete pro career, which in comparison to the Yankees early projections has not faired well. He was a wasted trade chip.

  29. GreenBeret7 May 4th, 2008 at 1:37 am

    You’ve got a kid who had hand and wrist surgery and missed the last month plus of the 2007 season. You’ve got a kid who doesn’t speak or understand much, if any, English. You’ve got a kid who’s most likely never failed on the baseball diamond. Most of all, you’ve got a kid that’s playing against players that are 2 and 3 years older than he is. His team mates go out and and have some fun and a drink to relax, and he can’t go because he’s underage.

    He made a mistake in judgement. If that’s the worst error in judgement, he’s going to be an outstanding person. Most of all, he’s a kid. The ones doing the most criticizing are most likely the same ones who done things a lot more stupid and rash than this was.

  30. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Mission 2708 May 4th, 2008 at 1:37 am

    Brandon: Please email me when you do! It’s probably one of the most important parts of the game today, but you don’t generally read a whole lot about it.

  31. Micky#7--Old Ranger May 4th, 2008 at 1:38 am

    If one is very good and told how great the expectations are and it has been easy….then oops! All of a sudden, it isn’t as easy as it was in A ball, better ball players tend to make a kid look bad. When he has figured things out he will come to the conclusion; He wouldn’t be there (at his age) if the Yanks didn’t want to have him extend himself an be the player they think he can be. Buck up kid, more people then your family are pulling for you…after all, you are part of the greatest baseball family in the world. 27/08.

  32. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 7) May 4th, 2008 at 1:40 am

    I will do so Rebecca. And it really is.

  33. GreenBeret7 May 4th, 2008 at 1:41 am

    One last thing about Tabata. It’s somewhat of a stretch to say that he’s Manny Ramirez Jr. He’s most likely going to be more like Bobby Abreu from the right side and without the large strikeout totals. Good line drive power, great fielder and arm, could play any of three positions well, and fast. If he’s Bobby Abreu Jr., NYY has something special.

  34. jay destro May 4th, 2008 at 1:43 am

    the true test on how well a guy will be is how he handles failure, not just how he succeeds. Baseball is a game in which you fail far more than succeed at the plate. The key is to take it one at bat at a time. A great ball player has a short memory and goes out there every day hoping to hit every at bat or strike out everyone out if you are a pitcher.

  35. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Mission 2708 May 4th, 2008 at 1:44 am

    Hoping the best for Tabata. Brandon, I look forward to that piece :)

    Right guys, it’s late and I have a paper to write tomorrow (my last one from scratch!) so I’d best be off.

    Night and hope for a good Rasner start!

  36. pat May 4th, 2008 at 1:46 am

    Tabata’s reaction is not all that different than a 19 year old who wants to drop out of college because they don’t feel they can cut it. Usually a little time, encouragement and hard work can turn the situation around.

    The Yankees have a player on their roster who knows a little something about trying to live up to expectations, struggling on the field(2006) and working through the struggles(2007). He seems to work well with the kids, has a 10 year committment to the Yankees and might have a little free time on his hands for the next week or so.

    If Tabata has the type of personality that would be receptive to it, somebody in the organization should encourage A-Rod to call him with a little pep talk.

  37. GreenBeret7 May 4th, 2008 at 1:46 am

    Duncan is still only 23 hand has made big strides this year. A lot of the trouble was being rushed through the system instead of the Yanks taking their time. This was only exacerbated by the injuries that helped stunt his growth.

  38. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 7) May 4th, 2008 at 1:50 am

    “Duncan is still only 23 hand has made big strides this year. A lot of the trouble was being rushed through the system instead of the Yanks taking their time. This was only exacerbated by the injuries that helped stunt his growth.”

    GB7 it really is good to have you back. And so much of that is true.

  39. jay destro May 4th, 2008 at 1:50 am

    Greenberet. Being rushed can be placed firmly on the head of cashman. In a time where cashman was allowing guys like cj henry to be their first roundnpick, he seemed to rush up some talent simply to improve their value. Its a shame where Duncan has landed but at this point I can’t see him ever hitting the Bronx roster aside from a sept call up.

  40. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 7) May 4th, 2008 at 1:56 am

    they really didn’t have a choice w/ Eric Duncan he had so much potential and still has so much potential, lately I’m gonna be honest he’s been showing life w/ the bat at AAA. He’s fought to get his batting AVG to .269, he already has more HR and SB than he had all of last season. Don’t sleep on this kid this year.

  41. kasey May 4th, 2008 at 2:02 am

    you can only hope the kid gets out of his own head and starts playing up to his potential.

    outside of that, he didn’t ask for his release, so any pontificating on the subject is relatively moot.

  42. Clare May 4th, 2008 at 2:03 am

    GB7,

    I saw where you were posting the other day, but I was reading the thread much later.

    Anyway, I was really glad to see you back online. You were missed while you were gone, and several times people asked about you.

    Hope your treatment continues to go well. Best wishes for a complete recovery.

  43. Bad Scooter May 4th, 2008 at 2:06 am

    I get a kick when people say “Duncan went unclaimed in the Rule 5 draft, nobody wanted him!” What team in their right mind is going to be able to keep Duncan on their Major League roster throguhout the whole season and why would they? He needs AB’s if his ever going to amount to anything.

    With that being said, it seems like the Yanks have sort of given up on him. They bat him 7th and 8th in the lineup at Scranton most of the time. And he doesn’t even play every day. If they really believed in Duncan, don’t you think they’d play him every day and bat him a little higher in the order to get more AB’s?

  44. GreenBeret7 May 4th, 2008 at 2:16 am

    Brandon and Clare…thank you so much for the kind words. It’s good to be back. Hell, it’s good to be anywhere.

    Mussina may be doing his job with smoke and mirrors, but, he’s still doing it. He’s the perfect mentor for Kennedy to study. I mentioned something on the ESPN board yesterday that Kennedy’s stuff looks the same as last year, but, it seems that his thought process on how to pitch is messed up. I wasn’t crazy about Eiland’s choice as pitching coach, and, it was apparently him that changed Hughes motion and mechanics. I wouldn’t be surprised if the thought processes of Kennedy didn’t come from Eiland, also. Eiland’s legacy is supposed to be the three kids and he’s wanting to make them in his image. Just my feelings….nothing concrete.

  45. mel May 4th, 2008 at 2:22 am

    Green Beret,

    Nice to see you back!

    Re: Tabata. Part of the problem’s bound to be the ascension of A-Jack’s star. Tabata was the future CF for the Yankees, but Austin’s spot on the radar’s much larger and closer. Of course, Tabata’s wrist problems would hold him back, but he really needs to keep it all in perspective.

  46. Mike Ashmore May 4th, 2008 at 2:26 am

    I cover Tabata on a semi-daily basis (covering only home games, not going on the road with the team).

    He’s not a bad kid at all. He just wasn’t hitting and got frustrated. He didn’t handle the situation well at all, but he’s only 19.

    I personally think he’s a bit overmatched right now, but he put together one of the best games I’ve seen him play last night, going 2-for-4.

    The night before, it was his hustle down the first base line that broke up a double play, allowing the only run of the game to score for a 1-0 Trenton win.

    Give him time, he’ll come around. This is just a bump in the road.

  47. Mike Ashmore May 4th, 2008 at 2:28 am

    Also, real quick…just to touch on what Pete said at the end, Tabata is nowhere near Major League ready right now, not even close.

  48. NJ in Tampa May 4th, 2008 at 2:28 am

    “Two words, “Mickey Mantle”. Mantle had a moment when he too decided that he should quit while having trouble in the minors. His dad went to pick him up and told him that he was going to go home and work in the mines. Mickey faced himself, decided not to quit, and went on to be, well… Mickey Mantle.”

    That was the first thing that came to my mind as well. The kid is only 19. Lets hope he can get things straightened out and 10 years from now we will look back at this and find it hard to believe.

  49. GreenBeret7 May 4th, 2008 at 2:30 am

    Mel, I thank you very much for the welcome back. Nice to read your writings again. Was always a fun read from you and most of the others. The board has some serious humor provided by the ladies.

    When Jackson and Tabata played here in Savannah when Charleston came to town, and, when I would go to Charleston, the kids were pretty close. Tabata really should still be playing, at least half the season in Tampa, but, the Tampa team is loaded with good outfielders. He’ll be fine. He went 2-4 tonight, and, he’s still playing outstanding defense. He’s a kid and he thinks like a kid. He doesn’t like embarrassing himself when that’s never happened to him before.

  50. Clare May 4th, 2008 at 2:33 am

    Mike,

    Interesting – thanks for your take on it.

    pat, I like your suggestion that ARod give him a call.

    Does anyone know where ARod is these days? I was at the game today, but sitting in the upper deck so I couldn’t tell if he was in the dugout or not. I saw a shot of Posada on Friday on YES, but I haven’t seen ARod anywhere.

  51. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 7) May 4th, 2008 at 2:34 am

    Mike welcome to our blog, and thanks for commenting on the Tabata situation, you run the best Trenton Thunder coverage website. And please comment here whenever you can.

  52. GreenBeret7 May 4th, 2008 at 2:37 am

    Not sure, Clare, but, possibly in Tampa where he can get treatment where it’s warm and he could sneak over to Miami to see the latest little Rodriguez lady.

  53. Clare May 4th, 2008 at 2:44 am

    GB7,

    That would make sense. I just find it weird that no one is reporting on him now that he’s on the DL. I read somewhere that he is going to have another MRI in 10 days (after the last one, I assume) to see how he’s healing.

  54. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 7) May 4th, 2008 at 2:47 am

    Clare Alex was in the dugout today..he hasn’t missed a game even after his trip to the doctor.

    Alex 5/4/08 :D

  55. Clare May 4th, 2008 at 2:50 am

    Thanks Brandon.

    I actually saw that picture on another site and had absolutely no idea who it was. :) Looks like he’s in a good mood at least.

  56. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 7) May 4th, 2008 at 2:52 am

    did you see Jetes miss attempt jumpman Clare :lol:

  57. Clare May 4th, 2008 at 2:53 am

    Did I see what?

  58. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 7) May 4th, 2008 at 2:57 am

    Jumpman 2k8

    Jetes: “bad choice”

    Robi: “nothing good can come from that”

  59. GreenBeret7 May 4th, 2008 at 3:01 am

    There’s your answer, Clare. It’s nice to see that the media slugs have decided to vulture other targets besides Rodriguez, so, he finally gets a break. The slugs have decided to pick apart Hughes and Kennedy, to include the conspiracy theory that nothing was wrong with Hughes because nobody would tell them, so they do what they always do. They invent stuff. I wonder how long it will take to start attacking Tabata, now.

  60. Clare May 4th, 2008 at 3:02 am

    No, hadn’t seen that. Great picture.

    You miss some of those details from the nosebleed seats.

  61. Clare May 4th, 2008 at 3:07 am

    GB7,

    Not long at all. If Tabata makes it to NY, this incident will be brought up all the time by writers. I feel bad for the kid, especially because most of us can move past our teenage mistakes (and they generally don’t make the papers).

  62. GreenBeret7 May 4th, 2008 at 3:21 am

    He’s really a nice kid, always smiling and he enjoyed playing. The Ramirez comparisons are just so wrong on a lot of levels. He doesn’t have that kind of power, but, mostly, he’s no showboat and he’s certainly not lazy. He runs out everything. I think that he knows he was wrong. The best thing that could have happened was for him to open the season in Tampa and then promoted. Not sure who’s decision this was, but, I’m guessing that since everything was so easy for him, they thought it would go right on being easy. That jump from High A ball to AA ball is huge, and even bigger for a 19 year old hitter. He’s going to be just fine. He should be in NYY by 2010, and possibly in late 2009. Home runs will come when he’s healthy and a little more physically mature.

  63. whoa May 4th, 2008 at 4:40 am

    He’ll be fine.

  64. Doreen May 4th, 2008 at 7:31 am

    GreenBeret7 -

    Welcome back! I hope you are doing well.

    Having a 20-year-old daughter of my own, with the requisite 19-24 year old friends, I can’t imagine a single one of them in Jose Tabata’s situation. The important part of this is that he realized he was behaving rashly and came back. He’s a kid. You have to cut him some slack.

    Great to see Mussina pitching another fine game yesterday, and even better to see some life in the Yankees bats.

  65. Richard C May 4th, 2008 at 7:39 am

    Very sad about tabata.

    These players are surrounded by illusion. They are judged as human beings according to a series of numbers and how they perform in a game. They are payed obscene amounts of money according to the numbers that they put up in the game. Many of them come from poverty in the Carribean, South Amer. One week they are put up on a pedestal and cheered, the next they are booed and thrown in the dump, discarded. They are loved or hated according to their performance in a game. They are put in fishbowls. A glass pressure cooker! They are treated like livestock by the owners and the fans. These people are not race horses!! You get a 19 year old kid with 50 NYC reporters in his face, all with college degrees and recorders pointed at him, hoping he says something stupid so they get a good story tomorrow.

    All craziness. The only thing that is real in their lives is their passion for the game. Seriously, that is the only thing that is real and pure in their lives.
    God bless them all.

  66. UtilityMan May 4th, 2008 at 8:01 am

    H B M C
    A I I A
    P R G I
    P T U R
    Y H E O
    D L
    A
    Y

  67. Rodney May 4th, 2008 at 8:16 am

    Tabata has succeeded in every level in his baseball career. He started playing at the age of 16 and got married a year later. He never encountered failure in his baseball career until now.

    He needs a mentor (latino). Someone who will take him under his wing since he is so young and playing in AA.

    He will be fine. He just needs to grow up. This is good that he can taste failure now because IF he ever does make it to the major league he will go through it alot.

  68. pat May 4th, 2008 at 8:19 am

    Utility

    And he’s in NY so you can watch him celebrate it. It’s fate.

  69. YankeesTech May 4th, 2008 at 9:55 am

    The kid has enough to battle with in the minor leagues he doesn’t need to be his own worst enemy. Someone should install some confidence into this kid.

  70. Micky#7--Old Ranger May 4th, 2008 at 10:10 am

    Greenberet…
    Nice to see you posting again. As stated above, many have been asking about you and praying. 27/08.

  71. johnblacksox May 4th, 2008 at 10:11 am

    Question: Someone mentioned Tabata is being rushed…Doesn’t he have the same sort of contract that Wily Mo Pena had with the Yankees? WMP had to be on the big league roster by a certain time or he could become a free agent. And it was something crazy aggressive, like when he was 21 or something. That’s why NY had to trade him. I thought Tabata had the same deal.

    Second, he’s not “a kid”, he’s 19 and married. You can say he’s “immature”, but not a “kid”.

    Regardless, the Yankees once top prospect is having another disappointing year, and now has some major character/emotional issues. This has to be a huge downer for the farm system.

  72. bru May 4th, 2008 at 10:23 am

    give tabata 2 yrs,he will be only 22 yrs old.there is so much pressure on this kid and he thought about it,realized he made a mistake,came back,wen’t 2-4.don’t judge someone unless you are in his shoes.he hurt nobody,he is in a foreign country,speaks little english and has no family here,i am assuming.

  73. Jonathon May 4th, 2008 at 10:25 am

    “If ever.”

    That’s a little rash…this is a 19 year old kid. Even it takes him 4 years to reach the Bronx…he’s still only 22.

  74. Jonathon May 4th, 2008 at 10:27 am

    Also, he took accountability for himself and his actions. The statement he gave showed some level of maturity…maybe this will clear his head and he comes back and plays within himself.

  75. Mike Ashmore May 4th, 2008 at 10:45 am

    You can be 19 and married and still be a kid. Trying to rush the process of becoming an adult doesn’t change the fact that he can’t even drink a beer in the clubhouse yet.

  76. bodhisattva May 4th, 2008 at 10:52 am

    To say that Tabata won’t make it anytime soon “if ever” seems an irresponsible comment.

    “If ever” has absolutelly no value, unless you back it up w/something. I’ve seen him play enough to know he certainly has a special bat. I wish writers would avoid the grandiose.

  77. bigjf May 4th, 2008 at 11:51 am

    I agree with you, bodhisattva, the “if ever” comment is a bit strong. I was very impressed with what I saw from this kid last year. He’s got a great swing, and I began to understand some of the comparisons to Manny Ramirez as a hitter. But he is only 19, so it puts a ton of pressure on him when he hears that he’s supposed to put up Manny-like numbers. As far as considering asking for his release, we’ve all had moments of self-doubt like that. Hopefully he serves his suspension, takes that time to think things over (hopefully he’s got some good family support behind him), and he comes back with some perspective and matures from this. I have high hopes for this kid, but he needs to realize that it’s ok to slump for a while. Just work hard at it, and if you have the talent to make it in this game (which I believe he does), then your work is going to pay off.

  78. Mike S. May 4th, 2008 at 11:55 am

    …if ever. That is a little harsh. He’s only 19, and it’s probably the first time he has struggled to this extent.

    It’s a little disturbing since maturity is needed in NY more than anywhere else.

    But aren’t we FORGETTING HISTORY HERE????

    At the same age, 19, Mickey Mantle was sent down to KC by the Yanks (KC at that time was a minor league team. Not the KC Royals or the KC A’s). Mantle continued to struggle at KC. He considered quitting. His father Mutt had to tell him, “if that’s all the guts you have, then it’s for the best. Come back home and work in the mines like me.”

    Forget that story? It happened to Mantle. Give the kid a break. He’s just 19 and in AA. If he needs to stay in AA in 2009 (or 2010) so be it. Even if he is in AA at 21, hopefully he then gets his act together…21 and AA? That’s not too bad at all, is it?

  79. Hideki Balboni May 4th, 2008 at 1:45 pm

    Some prospects leave the game without permission when they are struggling. Others break a rib.

  80. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 7) May 4th, 2008 at 3:01 pm

    johnblacksox
    May 4th, 2008 at 10:11 am
    Question: Someone mentioned Tabata is being rushed…Doesn’t he have the same sort of contract that Wily Mo Pena had with the Yankees? WMP had to be on the big league roster by a certain time or he could become a free agent. And it was something crazy aggressive, like when he was 21 or something. That’s why NY had to trade him. I thought Tabata had the same deal.

    Second, he’s not “a kid”, he’s 19 and married. You can say he’s “immature”, but not a “kid”.

    Regardless, the Yankees once top prospect is having another disappointing year, and now has some major character/emotional issues. This has to be a huge downer for the farm system.

    1. Willy Mo Pena was paid $2.3 million by the Yankees Amateur scouting team, those scouts are no longer w/ us. Jose Tabata recieved $500,000 (chump change buddy)

    2. WMP had effort issues and word around was he partied, and drank alot. Also didn’t take his full game serious (character issues)

    3. How is Tabata having a disappointing anything, he’s one of the youngest position players in AA ball

    4. he was scouted at 14, drafted at 16, flown away as a kid, missed most of his childhood to persue his dream, Jetes at 22 was as fragile as he was the only difference is he had an older mentor in Darryl Strawberry

    5. no it’s not a huge downer to the farm either. I hate these types of comments.

  81. NJ in Tampa May 5th, 2008 at 12:18 am

    He went 2-4 on Sunday.


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