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Brett Marshall honored

Posted by: Peter Abraham - Posted in Misc on Jun 15, 2008 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

The Houston Chronicle today named Yankees draft pick Brett Marshall as its high school player of the year.

Marshall was taken in the sixth round. He has signed a letter of intent with Rice but is likely to sign with the Yankees. They had him on the field for batting practice before Friday’s game as part of the recruiting process.

The Yankees didn’t use that valuable a pick unless they knew Marshall wanted to play pro ball.

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27 Responses to “Brett Marshall honored”

  1. Steve June 15th, 2008 at 10:55 pm

    It’s obvious that the Yankees have the right idea with drafting, after 2006. Kennedy and Joba were huge acquisitions. Sure they were 1st round and supplemental picks, but Damon Oppenheimer knows what he’s up to. I’ve heard talk of the Yankees going after C.C. Sabathia this year, so they would have him for a strong performance down the stretch, but then let him walk after the year to get the type A supplemental pick. This can’t hurt really, it’d be nice to have another strong lefty on the staff, especially with a sometimes weak 5th starter spot, and an ailing Wang. But yea, the Yanks know what they’re up to in drafting now. Losing so many years in a row has some good effects, such as reevaluating their system for the better. Sadly, it means less championships.

  2. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Mission 2708 June 15th, 2008 at 10:59 pm

    I love the change in draft philosophy, but it’s important to remember that not every prospect will make it, and sometimes it’s the ones we don’t expect to go very far that do.

  3. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 12 ) June 15th, 2008 at 11:05 pm

    Steve none of that is going to happen that’s pure media speculation.

  4. CB June 15th, 2008 at 11:10 pm

    People often wonder why young pitchers seem so much more injury prone than in the past.

    One factor that isn’t discussed enough is the the win at all costs mentality has intensified in amateur ball – high scool, little league, etc.

    Here’s a quote from Marshall. He was asked what his most memorable moment in high school was:

    “Q: What is the most memorable moment of your high school career?

    A: Our very last playoff game when we lost to Westside (in the Region III-5A semifinals). It was my last game on the mound. That was probably the most people that stadium (Ronnie Kluch Field) has ever had. I was tired. I threw 146 pitches and was still throwing hard at the end – I didn’t want to give up.”

    That’s great. Kid works hard all summer, increases his veolocity enought to turn into a first round caliber talent. And his high school coach has him throw 146 pitches in a playoff game. That’s really looking out for a 17 year olds best interest.

    A great quote from Marshall:

    Q: Your biggest sports role model is…

    A: Derek Jeter. Whenever I was a big Yankee fan I used to read about him and he’s one of the reasons I never gave up. When he was a kid he said he’d play shortstop for the New York Yankees. He’s another guy who never gave up on his dream.

  5. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Mission 2708 June 15th, 2008 at 11:15 pm

    CB: How the @$@#$ does a 17 year old throw that many pitches?! Most pros can’t do that!

  6. Steve June 15th, 2008 at 11:15 pm

    Well yeah I doubt it will happen personally. But my point using that example was that this is a new team. This is a team that will let established all-stars walk if it means setting a strong foundation for the future. Now that’s not saying anything against Sabathia, who’s a very respectable ace. It’s just that Cashman and others in the front office have finally realized what we realized many years before. 200 million does not guarantee a championship. A strong team of 25 players with less than 5 years experience can be better than one with 25 former all-stars and mvps. I’m glad they’ve realized this.

  7. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 12 ) June 15th, 2008 at 11:18 pm

    CB how about the old school SP that use to do that reguarly, why is this being held back on the amount of pitches a kid throws ? And yet it is when there is a pitch count limit they are subjected to in the pros that normally injures more pitchers than the latter, why is that ?

  8. Nick in SF but now in Charlotte June 15th, 2008 at 11:19 pm

    Joba is a big baby, he should be throwing 200 pitches by now if that high school kid threw 146. Joba should take over Wang’s starts plus his own if he really wants to contribute to the team.

  9. mel June 15th, 2008 at 11:20 pm

    CB,

    The team I follow is in the WAC with Fresno. Our ace was held out of the conference tourney because he wasn’t 100%. He could’ve gone for us, but the coach made the conscious decision to hold him back for his own sake. Two years ago they advanced to the superregional and the ace pitcher of that staff was under the weather. He didn’t run him out there for the opportunity to make it back to CWS, turned out he had mono.

    Those stories are few and far between, so you really got to respect good guys like that.

  10. CB June 15th, 2008 at 11:20 pm

    Rebecca,

    It’s really just sad. But the coaches in amateur ball often don’t look out for the kids well being. 146 pitches as a 17 year old.

    Marshall is going to get at least supplemental round money from the yankees. That’s over $1M dollars. He hurts his elbow or shoulder on pitch 145 that’s all gone.

    And even outside of the immediate issue of his draft status, its just terrible for coaches to take advantage of the health of high school students to win at all costs.

    And if you read between the lines you get a sense that Marshall was proud of going that long. He should be. It’s unfortunate that he shouldn’t be real proud of the coach who left him out on the mound.

    Kids get abused at younger ages now. Little league, high school, Connie Mack, and in college. It plays a role in the injuries we see down the line in pro ball.

  11. Y's Guy June 15th, 2008 at 11:23 pm

    just watched the us open on tivo. im wondering why nobody ever mentions tiger throwing his clubs. when others do it, they always get called out, sergio, john daly, etc, ut tiger does in at a major on the 18th hole and nobody says word 1.

    cant wait for the playoff, im off tomorrow.

  12. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 12 ) June 15th, 2008 at 11:27 pm

    CB can you answer my question, I know that injuries especially shoulder, elbow ligaments vary for a player but why is it when they are subjected to a pitch count in the pros usually when the most pitchers get hurt ?

    And if pitch count is so strick why it is when a kid has a Perfect Game or No Hitter going it’s thrown out the window ?

  13. mel June 15th, 2008 at 11:27 pm

    Y’s guys,

    I saw that, and as a Tiger fan, I’d rather he didn’t. But for him to bounce back and sink that putt was impressive IMO.

  14. CB June 15th, 2008 at 11:28 pm

    “how about the old school SP that use to do that reguarly, why is this being held back on the amount of pitches a kid throws ?”

    Brandon,

    It’s called selection bias. You hear all of these great stories about what Nolan Ryan and Jim Palmer did but you rarely hear the stories about the scores of arms that were ruined by working pitchers so hard.

    Those guys just fall away into anonymity and you never hear or see how their careers were ruined.

    A question for you to consider – how good a pitcher was Mel Stottlemyre? Do you think of him as a great pitcher? If you don’t you should ask yourself why?

    Again – there’s a real simple saying in statistics that really can’t be emphasized enough – correlation is not causality.

  15. Y's Guy June 15th, 2008 at 11:29 pm

    o yeah, i love watching the guy, he’s the best ever, but everybody being too scared of pissing him off and not getting an interview or something is really weak.

    i cant wait to watch them tomorrow, david and goliath, the best ever and possibly the oldest major winner ever. one guy who kills it and on guy who plays short and down the middle, gotta love it!

    oh yeah, big yankees win today!

  16. Nick in SF but now in Charlotte June 15th, 2008 at 11:31 pm

    Y’s Guy, there’s presently a backlog in Sports World Outrage. The general sports fan population is still trying to process your charges against Arod and Jeter being loafers to get to the Tiger club-throwing scandal. Rest assured, his shameful behavior was noticed.

  17. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Mission 2708 June 15th, 2008 at 11:32 pm

    CB: No kidding. I mean, am I the only one that thinks it’s exploitive to televise nationally the Little League World Series? I mean, they’re 11 and 12 year old boys still young enough to cry when they lose…

    It’s ridiculous.

    I remember something my rec basketball coach said one year: If you’re not having fun, you shouldn’t be here.

    At the rec level, at least, it was all about fun. But even in middle school, at the school level (I was never good enough to make the team even when something like 12 out of 18 that tried out made it), it was taken really seriously.

    High school was another matter altogether. I went to a high school that replaced a perfectly good football field with an $800,000 turf field and paid for flat screen tvs in the weight room, while the ceilings in the science and social sciences wings had to be gutted because of asbestos.

    It’s too much pressure on most of these teens, and I don’t even want to get into how much of it is from parents.

    I grant you gymnasts and divers who peak early, but baseball players do not.

  18. Y's Guy June 15th, 2008 at 11:34 pm

    ill say it again, nick i really like arod and jeter and tiger, but i will call guys out for the same things lesser guys get called out for and i think its weak that announcers arent fair.

    and once again, i cant wait to watch tiger again tomorrow.

  19. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 12 ) June 15th, 2008 at 11:35 pm

    I understand that CB but even you have to notice the more SP that get to the pros are limited nowadays to 6 inning games, there is no real length in the start to start basis like it was back in the day. CG now are rare events. A SP gets to 100 pitches the BP is automatically warming up, how is a SP suppose to give value and earn wins w/ this method ? Check how many pitches per game guys like Sandy and the young Mike Mussina or young Pedro or John Smoltz use to throw. Wouldn’t you agree these are pitchers that got stronger w/ more work load while this generation of SP resembles fragile 6 inning and out guys ?

  20. CB June 15th, 2008 at 11:36 pm

    “why is it when they are subjected to a pitch count in the pros usually when the most pitchers get hurt ?”

    Because in a lot of cases by the time the pitchers get to pro ball and get put on pitch counts its too late.

    They’ve already thrown 146 pitches in games as high schoolers or other such nonsense.

    One of the major trends over the last 30 years in baseball is for more and more kids to go to college rather than enter the minors directly from high school.

    Why isn’t that a plausible reason for why there seem to be more injuries to pitchers?

    Jeremy Bleich had elbow tendinitis this year that kept him out for weeks and knocked him out of any chance of getting drafted in the first round.

    Last game in the college WS he had a pitch count of 75. The Stanford coach left him in for 89 pitches.

    That’s a very, very small example but one that affects the yankees directly. And Stanford is a great program – a great program that is amongst the best in the way they tread their players. College coaches are paid to win. Not always in the players best interest.

    Go look up the history of pitchers drafted from Rice say between 1995 to around 2005. See how well they did in the majors. And then take a look with how they were used in college.

    Might be a reason why the pitch counts they may have been put on in the pros was too little too late.

  21. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Mission 2708 June 15th, 2008 at 11:40 pm

    Brandon: There’s a difference between a regular workload, say, 100-120 pitches, and throwing 146 when you’re 17.

    I think in some respects there’s too much emphasis on pitch counts, but I also think there’s too much emphasis on making every prospect the next All Star.

    The idea is everything in moderation.

  22. CB June 15th, 2008 at 11:43 pm

    “CG now are rare events. A SP gets to 100 pitches the BP is automatically warming up, how is a SP suppose to give value and earn wins w/ this method ?”

    Sure complete games are now rare.

    But you know what isn’t? Pitchers pitching effectively into their late 30′s and into their early 40′s.

    Complete games are discussed all the time. But you can’t discuss the disappearance of the compete game without also talking about the extension of pitchers careers.

    A lot of this is economics. You’re talking about times when the teams could have cared less about the players career in the long term – no guaranteed big money contracts. Point was to win now.

    Do you seriously think Sandy Koufax consistently pitching through elbow pain was a good thing? Go look at Koufax’s innings pitches. You’ll see a really strange disconnect between how many complete games he threw and how many innings he’d throw in a season. He threw way fewer innings per season than you’d guess based on the number of complete games he threw.

    Pitchers now provide value over time – over the length of ever expanding careers.

  23. CB June 15th, 2008 at 11:48 pm

    “Check how many pitches per game guys like Sandy and the young Mike Mussina or young Pedro or John Smoltz use to throw. Wouldn’t you agree these are pitchers that got stronger w/ more work load while this generation of SP resembles fragile 6 inning and out guys ?”

    No. Not at all. By far the most important factor in John Smoltz’s career was modern medical technology. That’s what made him stronger.

    When Smoltz goes into the hall it’ll be a true land mark – one that is even greater than Smoltz’s accomplishments.

    I believe he’ll be the first pitcher to have TJ surgery to make the hall. Or he is the first to have it at a young age to make the hall.

    Same thing but to a lesser extent with Pedro – shoulder surgery.

    If Smoltz was pitching 40 years ago he would have thrown a ton of pitches and “strengthened” his arm even more. But he would have wound up out of the game as a nothing or at best as Mel Stottlemeyer.

  24. Brandon (supporting "Alex being Alex") (J.Santana HR allowed count: 12 ) June 15th, 2008 at 11:50 pm

    Rebecca I guarantee you the old school SP had more than 146 pitches at 17. Usually that type of workload is an immense burden but what it does for the future of that pitcher is build up his endurance. I’m not saying it’s the right thing but this B.S. about how a pitch count over 120 is ridiculous and threatens the career of a future ML pitcher is a bit over blown, if he’s working his muscles and gaining muscle memory plus the stamina he when he gets to the pros will more than likely be a successful pitcher because his fatigue will not be in question, he would already know what it is to be stretched out.

    I think it’s just the opposite if a kid saids he’s alright and can still go ofcourse you have to pay attention to him closely but the job of the H.S. coach believe or not is to build him up. I use to think that the game pushed the pitch count more than H.S. and college I never would have thought it was the opposite, what that tells me is the game is getting soft.

  25. MC June 25th, 2008 at 12:57 pm

    All the talk about Marshalls pitching skills are great and fine, but the true character of this young man are over the top. He is a very respectable and kind yourng man with a heart bigger than Texas. So no matter how big the money, the name of the team or how many pitches he throws… High moral character and integrity is something no one can take away from this guy. He will be an asset whatever he does!

  26. Hitman August 18th, 2008 at 6:02 am

    “Sure complete games are now rare.

    But you know what isn’t? Pitchers pitching effectively into their late 30’s and into their early 40’s.”

    Give me a break. How many starters are effective year after year once they hit their early 30s? Forget about mid to late 30s and 40s. You’re in some fantasy land. The Glavines, Madduxes and Johnsons are a rare breed in this day and age. Most top guys actually begin to break down soon after their 20s are behind them. That’s when performance and health become erratic. Look at the complete history of top of the rotation guys from the past ten years and tell me you can find one guy outside of Clemens, Maddux, etc who’s putting up the same cy young type numbers he was in his 20s.

  27. Mark December 15th, 2008 at 10:33 pm

    Brett Marshall played at my shcool Ross S Sterling ….
    Mostly everyday when were warming up on the field hes out there trowing …today i met him , i thought he would be cooler but hes kinda of an a.s.s he acts like a total dick. Hes pretty stuck up and expects for evryone to do evrything for him.

    I did get a ball signed by him though haha.

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