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Pinch hitting: Zac’s Yankees Blog

Posted by: Peter Abraham - Posted in Misc on Jan 10, 2009 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

January is traditionally a slow month for baseball news. So for the second year in a row, we will showcase other blogs with a series of pinch hitters.

Next up is Zac from Zac’s Yankees Blog..

Zac is 21 and says he’s been a Yankees fan all his life. “The 2001 World Series will always hold a special place in my heart due to the fact most New Yorkers where trying to cope with the aftermath of 9/11. I will never forget the magical Tino Martinez, Derek Jeter, Scott Brosius home runs,” he said. Zac is a business student at Indiana University majoring in finance.

Here’s his post:

————

Yankee Stadium. The sanctified stadium that has authored some of our most esteemed childhood memories as die-hard Yankee fans and baseball fans alike, the holy grounds that have been blessed by the supernatural powers of Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, and Derek Jeter, the baseball cathedral that served as a healing ground after September 11th by hosting one of greatest World Series of all time, the sacred stadium that will no longer be.

The old Yankee Stadium has departed our lives, but the countless memories and moments have not. The treasured moments of Lou Gehrig’s famous speech, Don Larsen’s perfect game in the World Series, crazed fans charging the diamond after Chris Chamblis blasted a pennant-winning home run, Reggie Jackson crushing three mammoth home runs in the World Series, Aaron Boone delivering a magical ALCS walk-off home run vs. the Red Sox, or any moment in particular that makes you quiver with joy and commemoration will be etched into eternity because of what is really behind the memory.

The common factor in any Yankee moment we cherish collectively is Yankee magic. Yankee magic is that vibe that has derived from the arduous path to obtaining 26 world champion trophies. Yankee magic is that fixation that sparks the great Yankee rallies and moments that consume your thoughts with special memories when the team is engaged in a close game late inning game. Yankee Stadium will soon be lost, but the Yankee magic will never be lost. As long as the famed pinstripes are donned the aura Yankee magic will follow them.

As we part ways with the old Yankee Stadium and embrace the new Yankee Stadium a new generation of new-fangled memories and everlasting moments will be formulated. The new stadium offers a novel era of hope and promise that will be backed by the eternal Yankee magic. Stadiums may come and go, but Yankee magic is timeless.

————

Thanks, Zac. Coming tomorrow: Chris from Pinstriped Scranton.

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96 Responses to “Pinch hitting: Zac’s Yankees Blog”

  1. Nettles Punched Bill Lee January 10th, 2009 at 1:04 am

    Great post Zac. I enjoyed reading your writing.

  2. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Staying to write the story January 10th, 2009 at 1:05 am

    Yankee Stadium is a part of us, and it will never truly leave us-things are never truly gone until the last person that remembers them no longer lives.

  3. Jordan January 10th, 2009 at 1:08 am

    We’re off the path again. Last nights post was fantastic. This one was nice and sentimental but pretty repetitive, unoriginal, and pointless.

  4. dave January 10th, 2009 at 1:34 am

    hOW Could you possibly say 2001 was the greatest world series of all time? There are so many to choose from and you pick the one we lost in the ninth inning of game seven as “the greatest” because it was the year of 9/11. It was one of the better playoff runs but i wouldnt call the world series itself the greatest of all time. I have only seen the yankees win four and i can think of at least four that were better than the 2001 world series.

  5. jennifer January 10th, 2009 at 1:34 am

    Jordon did you ever hear the saying if you don’t have anything nice to say don’t say anything at all?

    I really don’t understand why people have to be so rude and nasty.

    Getting on Sam I am was one thing, he had factually incorrect items in his post. But to rip someones writing cause you just don’t like it is a whole other thing.

    That said nice job Zac. Ignore the haters.

  6. dave January 10th, 2009 at 1:36 am

    Maybe the most painful, the most heart-wrenching, the most depressing but the greatest?

    I enjoyed the rest of your post though outside of that one comment.

  7. eLneneM360 [ we Getting '' a-rod '' moneii ] January 10th, 2009 at 1:43 am

    i became a Yankees Fan in 2000 when i first came to this country and I gotta tell You, the 2000 world series against the mets was good but it wasnt exciting enough since we were choking the mets since the first started but i would say the 2001 world series was the greatest one in My life since the Two teams had to battled it out until the end, it was the most emotional one as well though.

  8. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Staying to write the story January 10th, 2009 at 1:45 am

    Dave, pretend for a moment you live in the world and you are not a Yankee fan.

    I know it’s hard.

    But in that case, 2001 is considered one of the those most dramatic and all-around best World Series ever played.

    In terms of being good for baseball, 2001 was excellent.

  9. dave January 10th, 2009 at 1:47 am

    But the yankees lost which really made it lose some of its charm as a yankee fan. Maybe its just me but when the yanks lost, that series came crashing down for exciting to miserable all with that luis gonzalez hit. I would say 96 was my favorite series followed by 2000. Im sure a lot of yankee fans in this generation would go with those two.

  10. dave January 10th, 2009 at 1:49 am

    I agree if i wasnt a yankee fan, 2001 wouldnt have lost all of its charm and excitement when the yankees lost so I could see what he is saying.

    But these are both yankee fans that are saying 2001 was there favorite series of all time…
    That is incomprehensible to me merely because the fact that they lost should negate so much of the positive experience by negative feelings that I cant imagine how a yankee fan could think that. But to each his own and we will just agree to disagree.

  11. eLneneM360 [ we Getting '' a-rod '' moneii ] January 10th, 2009 at 1:53 am

    maybe the fact that we fought until The last moment and we still lost makes it unforgettable and probably That makes 2001 world series stand out more from the others.

  12. dave January 10th, 2009 at 1:55 am

    Lets just hope there is a lot of THAT yankee magic floating around next year in the new stadium. The best way to make up for the disgrace of a season the yanks had last year in the most winningest stadium in all of professional sports is to win one the first year in the new stadium – Then and only then will babe ruth forgive the 2008 yankees for mucking up the last year of the stadium he worked so hard to build. And it would sent an excellent tone for the new stadium by immediately starting its own version of winning yankee tradition and history. And as rudy guliani says incessantly, LETS GO YANKS!

  13. AROD fan January 10th, 2009 at 2:08 am

    Zac: I dream of having a yankee blog one day, and you have one already so hats off to you. You possess an obvious talent for writing.

    Pete: Thank you for giving us this needed respite from the toil of playing GM and giving us the welcome opp to play sports lit editor.

    Future posters: Can we cut the sappiness please? The Yankees nostalgia/incantation/bat mitzvah (all apparently inspired by “Yankee Stadium: The Last Season”) is tired. Find a new theme. The stadium switch was traumatic, but must we multiply our trauma by peddling our latest epiphanies about how deep we are because of our loss? These posts are for pansies. Shake it up a bit. Write with some balls.

  14. dave January 10th, 2009 at 2:22 am

    tHE come back games were amazing with Comeback wins off Kim in the ninth in two different games to keep the yankees alive. bUT THAT is also what made it so painful in the end – we were so close and fought soo hard to get to that ninth inning in game seven and without that ridiculous blooper we had the ring in our grasp. That was also one of the weakest hits fall in for a single that I had ever seen at the time. Id seen mariano give up those weak ones before but that ball barely got off the bat. I still dont know how it went out of the infield. Even the memories are painful over 7 years later. I could still remember my heart sink and the tears swelling up in my eye as I watched the look on mariano’s face as he walked off the mound. Awful feeling. And there was no one to blame because mo had been the greatest closer in playoff history almost unblemished in his career up to that moment.

  15. Phil January 10th, 2009 at 2:22 am

    The 2001 World Series was brutal. Why’d we leave the infield in? Why didn’t we change our signals? That was ridiculous.

  16. dave January 10th, 2009 at 2:28 am

    arod fan – i agree wholeheartedly – once was enough, twice was plenty. At this point, its enough. They all sound very similar too. I want more like Mike’s about the yankees new revenue sources or one to talk about the new yankees or guys like joba, hughes and kennedy again. Those guys seem to have been lost in the flurry of free agency in the media and blog posts. Outside of the occasional mention of joba going to the pen or hughes making the rotation or kennedy in the fall league you dont hear a peep about them. While last year every single post and article had something to do with hughes or joba. I agree they arent as critical with CC and AJ but they will still have an impact on the team and their performances could very well determine how well the team does.

  17. Jordan January 10th, 2009 at 2:29 am

    Jennifer: I didn’t mean any harm or offense towards the poster, I simply wanted to express my opinion. I also hoped that others would agree with me and share their opinions (as AROD fan) has, and so future posters can come to the realization that there is limited interest in highly similar sappy, introspective but not profound posts. I agree that Zac’s post was well written, it just didn’t seem to have any purpose. We are all aware of what happened in 2001 and that this was the last season at Yankee Stadium-not need to continue to reiterate it.
    Posters: provide an interesting perspective, teach us new facts, pose an original argument- don’t just remember the good ol’ days and how it is that you became a Yankee fan.

  18. Mike January 10th, 2009 at 2:35 am

    You guys are getting off topic. This post isn’t about the 2001 world series. Its about a speacial thing the Yankees have that no other franchise does! Great post!

  19. dave January 10th, 2009 at 2:44 am

    jordan is right – the posters should discuss something that is original/exciting/telling/piques curiousity with new facts or ideas or themes that none or most of us aren’t aware of or have not really talked about. This post while well written is just not all that interesting.

    Mike,

    There isnt that much to say in response to the post. Ive tried. We could start recalling our favorite moments but frankly, that doesnt really make for interesting conversation or spark discussion.

  20. SI45 January 10th, 2009 at 6:56 am

    The guest posts need to be original. We have read the above thousands of times. The only original post has been the one on Yankee concession finances.

    The kid wrote it nicely…but it has been said all too often in the past 8 years.

  21. jim jones January 10th, 2009 at 7:43 am

    man, you really drank alot of that kool-ade!

  22. Vrsce January 10th, 2009 at 7:54 am

    The series that proved Joe Torre was not a genius.

  23. Vader January 10th, 2009 at 8:19 am

    Some one needs to inform Jonathan Lehman of the NY Post, that if he is going to write articles about prospects he should know a little something about them first.

    “The returns from stud center fielder Austin Jackson in the Arizona Fall League were underwhelming – more than one strikeout per four at-bats, a .298 on-base percentage, and worst of all for the gifted speedster, two stolen bases in 28 games.”

    Now I’m not a scout or anything like that, but from all the publications I’ve read on Yankees prospects…none have called Austin a stud or a speedster.

    If you’re going to knock the guy don’t make him out to be something that he isn’t to do it.

    http://www.nypost.com/seven/01.....149534.htm

  24. Drive 4-5 January 10th, 2009 at 8:23 am

    Nice post, Zach. The old Stadium was indeed a magical place. I’m glad my kids got to spend time watching games in it.They can pass the stories on to their kids.Like Rebecca said, “Yankee Stadium is a part of us, and it will never truly leave us-things are never truly gone until the last person that remembers them no longer lives.”

  25. Drive 4-5 January 10th, 2009 at 8:33 am

    I think it’s great that these young bloggers are sharing their passion for the Yankees. Baseball needs that. The baseball demographic is getting older,not younger.

  26. Doreen January 10th, 2009 at 8:46 am

    Zach – nice writing. I agree with your last sentiment – the old Stadium may be going, but the Yankee magic will be around forever. I had always contended that it was not so much the stadium as the players that created the Yankee magic, anyway. It’s just that the Stadium housed those memories – now they’ll move them to a new house, and create even more magical memories.

  27. Mark in Tampa January 10th, 2009 at 8:51 am

    “are never truly gone until the last person that remembers them no longer lives.”

    Didn’t that quote lead to the Susan Ross Foundation in a Seinfeld episode? Or is it from “The Wrath of Khan”?

  28. Pel January 10th, 2009 at 8:54 am

    I read something Jayson Stark wrote @ espn.com about the Hall of Fame ballot, and he mentioned Coney’s chances at ever getting into the Hall of Fame, and I gotta say, I’m a bit perturbed.

    ========

    http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/.....id=3818624

    *I didn’t vote for Cone. But the more I looked at his credentials, the better they got.*

    *His 194-126 lifetime record computes to a .606 winning percentage. That’s a higher winning percentage than Tom Glavine, Curt Schilling or John Smoltz. And among all 190-game winners in the division-play era, only nine pitchers beat that.*

    *Cone won a Cy Young, finished in the top four in the Cy Young voting four times and led his league, in various years, in strikeouts, strikeout ratio, wins and shutouts. And you know that rep he had as a big-game pitcher? He earned it. That 12-3 postseason record (including 10-1, 3.01 ERA, in the LCS and World Series) doesn’t lie.*

    *Ultimately, I felt as if he didn’t sustain his greatness long enough to be a Hall of Famer. But it’s no insult to say David Cone was not quite a Hall of Famer. At his best, he was one tremendous pitcher.*

    ========

    Notice anything?

    Yup. I know.

    Now, I go through my baseball loving life with the memories of Coney’s perfect game, and believe me I appreciate it.
    I realize how rare a feat it is for a pitcher to accomplish.

    Besides, Larsen to Yogi for the first pitch?
    I know, I know. Sentimentality aside

    Doesn’t that perfect game account for anything?

    I mean, I didn’t cherry pick what he wrote, either. Jayson Stark didn’t mention it.

    You would think that a perfect game would mean at least a little something, no? Come on, not even a mention? Surely it deserves a mention, right?

    Pete, am I the crazy one?

    Here I am thinking that a perfect game means something.

    What kind of research is he doing over there at ESPN?

    I mean, he mentions Smoltz, Schilling, and Glavine… none of them ever pitched a perfect game.

    *PETE! PAGING PETE! PLEASE COME TO THE CUSTOMER SERVICE DEPARTMENT!*

    I don’t mind being called biased because of the tone of my comment. I’m just saying… come on.

    My ranting and raving is over. Ugh… but it’s like researching Rickey Henderson and not saying anything about steals. Alright, alright, whatever.

  29. Drive 4-5 January 10th, 2009 at 9:20 am

    Just wondering…outside of Cody Ransom and Angel Berroa, who else is vying for the utility infielder’s job?

  30. GreenBeret7 January 10th, 2009 at 9:29 am

    Drive 4-5
    January 10th, 2009 at 9:20 am
    Just wondering…outside of Cody Ransom and Angel Berroa, who else is vying for the utility infielder’s job?

    ————————————————————

    Derek Jeter

  31. Rob NY -- 2009 The Road to Redemption January 10th, 2009 at 9:31 am

    zac– Nice bit about Yankee magic, I enjoyed it. Putting that kind of thing into words is something I don’t think too many people attempt so kudos for putting your feelings on the interwebs.

    Repost from last night:

    Why is the closer role overrated? Todd Jones stinks, and he converted 18/21, George Sherrill had a 96 ERA+ and STILL converted 31/37. Twelve of the thirteen closers in the American League had a .720 closing percentage or better, and even Mo blew one. So Mariano Rivera, greatest closer of all time didn’t save one opportunity he was given and Todd Jones only missed 3. Meanwhile the variance in result from Joba Chamberlain to say what a SP with a 96 ERA+ would be a world apart.

    My point is that a mediocre closer can get the job done an close most games. He won’t kill you. I think if we had Joba and Wang starting last summer and the kids in the ‘pen (without Mo for some reason) we’d have won more games than we did when Joba’s spot in the rotation has went to the much maligned Sidney Ponson with Mo there to close it out. You can probably call to the pen by the 3rd inning for Joba, “you have the night off buddy.”

    http://hosted.stats.com/mlb/getleaders.asp?rank=13

  32. Guiseppe Franco January 10th, 2009 at 9:33 am

    Has any ballplayer ever been voted into the Hall of Fame because of one game?

    Absolutely not.

    There have been 17 perfect games in history, but only 7 of them were thrown by Hall of Famers (or future Hall of Famers).

    Its safe to say that Koufax, Bunning, Big Unit, Catfish Hunter, and Cy Young would be in the Hall regardless if they had perfect games on their resumes or not.

  33. Drive 4-5 January 10th, 2009 at 9:36 am

    GB7,

    A Rod is our backup at short :)

  34. Guiseppe Franco January 10th, 2009 at 9:36 am

    I don’t think the closer’s role is overrated, but I certainly think the 8th inning setup role is.

  35. Ico-Jones January 10th, 2009 at 9:39 am

    Everyone who is scheduled to write a pinch-hitting blog (or write anything at all — whether about the Yankees or old Yankee Stadium or anything else) should look up the “maudlin” in the dictionary and do everything in their power to avoid having what they write from being described by that word.

    Give us opinions and insight, not your memories of the old stadium that are essentially identical to everyone else’s!

  36. GreenBeret7 January 10th, 2009 at 9:40 am

    Drive 4-5
    January 10th, 2009 at 9:36 am
    GB7,

    A Rod is our backup at short

    ————————————————————

    Seriously, though, NYY has nobody unless they bring up Ramiro Pena from last year’s Trenton team. The logical solution is to sign Alex Cora to fill that slot.

  37. Gary January 10th, 2009 at 9:41 am

    The main thing with a utility player is to be ready at all times. Take infield and batting practice serious like you will be playing that game.
    Players like Luis Sojo and Miguel Cairo were prepared at all times. Wilson Betemit was not.

  38. GreenBeret7 January 10th, 2009 at 9:44 am

    Ico-Jones
    January 10th, 2009 at 9:39 am
    Everyone who is scheduled to write a pinch-hitting blog (or write anything at all—whether about the Yankees or old Yankee Stadium or anything else) should look up the “maudlin” in the dictionary and do everything in their power to avoid having what they write from being described by that word.

    Give us opinions and insight, not your memories of the old stadium that are essentially identical to everyone else’s!

    ————————————————————

    So, quit flapping your fingers and write something worthy of us peons to read from the “Great Mind”.

  39. GreenBeret7 January 10th, 2009 at 9:45 am

    On second thought…here’s a correction” “The Great Wind”.

  40. Guiseppe Franco January 10th, 2009 at 9:47 am

    The problem with finding a very good and versatile utility player on the free agent market is that he’ll one good look at the roster and see the names Jeter, Cano, and A-Rod and assume he’s rarely going to play.

    The same can be said for Teixeira at first base.

    It’s pretty tough to get those guys out of the lineup unless they are dealing with a significant injury like the quad tears that A-Rod and Jeter dealt with last season.

  41. Drive 4-5 January 10th, 2009 at 9:49 am

    GB7,

    “Seriously, though, NYY has nobody unless they bring up Ramiro Pena from last year’s Trenton team. The logical solution is to sign Alex Cora to fill that slot.”

    To your point, there really isnt much in the way of infield depth at the moment. Alex Cora would be a nice pick-up.

  42. Drive 4-5 January 10th, 2009 at 9:51 am

    Is Alberto Gonzalez still with the Nationals? He doesnt have much of a bat but he’s a good fielder. I like Alex Cora better though.

  43. Mark in Tampa January 10th, 2009 at 9:51 am

    Maris had the all-time great season in ’61, and that wasn’t enough to get him in the Hall. A perfect game, while a great personal accomplishment; and an event that everybody viewing it will always remember, is just one game. When you boil it down, it is really no more effective than any other complete game shutout. It is akin to the cycle, or hitting 4 homers in a game.

  44. Drive 4-5 January 10th, 2009 at 9:56 am

    People tend to forget that Maris was the AL MVP in 1960 as well.He also was a 5 time All Star.

  45. Sam Borden January 10th, 2009 at 9:57 am

    Hey guys (and gals),
    We’re making NFL picks for the weekend’s playoff games at FACEOFF today. Come make your predictions! (I know, I know – you guys are more interested in Yankees: Over/under 97 wins? But still …)

    http://faceoff.lohudblogs.com/

  46. Phil January 10th, 2009 at 9:57 am

    Coney lost some wins, maybe enough to make the difference to the `94 strike. He was a big union guy through that. He was probably better than some of the pitchers who are in, but of course, they lasted longer.

  47. yankee21 January 10th, 2009 at 9:58 am

    Mark,

    I think the point related to Jayson Stark’s article the poster was making was Stark didn’t even mention the perfect game,,not that throwing a perfect game is grounds for induction. To not even state the point that Cone threw one of what 17 perfect games in history, regardless of whether it is the basis for a hall of fame career, is disingenuious.

    JMO, Cone was a tough and often-times dominant pitcher, but he didn’t dominate long enough to warrant entry.

  48. GreenBeret7 January 10th, 2009 at 10:00 am

    Drive 4-5
    January 10th, 2009 at 9:49 am
    GB7,

    “Seriously, though, NYY has nobody unless they bring up Ramiro Pena from last year’s Trenton team. The logical solution is to sign Alex Cora to fill that slot.”

    To your point, there really isnt much in the way of infield depth at the moment. Alex Cora would be a nice pick-up.

    ————————————————————

    Yeah, Cora could spell Rodriguez, Jeter and Cano in 7-10 games each, along with some late inning defense. With a little work, he could play a representattive outfield on occassion as well as 1st base. I’d even consider having him work out as a catcher in spring training. They almost never do that any more. Teams always had a utility guy that would catch late in a blowout game or long extra inning affair. One thing that he has over most utility players is that he can field and he can hit and bunt.

  49. GreenBeret7 January 10th, 2009 at 10:05 am

    Cone should get as much consideration as Schilling. Given the fewer years, his sumbers were nearly identical to Schillings. One thing about Schilling…in 20 seasons in the majors, he had 9 losing seasons.

  50. Roy January 10th, 2009 at 10:07 am

    I’m sorry to say that Cone isn’t a hall of famer. I love the guy, but he isn’t one of the greatest pitchers of all time. The hall of fame is rapidly becoming a place for very good players, not great players and to me that’s not right. Cone had a great career, but he’s not a hall of famer.

  51. Mark in Tampa January 10th, 2009 at 10:16 am

    The perfect game should have been mentioned. Certainly, it is not grounds on its own for induction, but it is a “resume-booster” so-to-speak.

    As far as vs. Schilling, I agree that Cone is just as deserving. Schilling should get very little support for HOF if not for his post-season games. However, Cone’s post-season numbers were great as well. I fear that what hinders Cone in that respect is that his playoff dominance was lost amongst the great Met rotation and the great Yankee dominance. Schilling had games that are more memorable to the average fan-beating the Yanks in ’01, the ketchup sock, and breaking the so-called curse. Unfortunately, the perception is that Schilling is the best big-gamer of the last 20 years, regardless of what may have really happened.

  52. Sean Serritella January 10th, 2009 at 10:31 am

    Nice post. Good luck with your blog. Keep writing.

  53. Tom January 10th, 2009 at 10:43 am

    Cone was a great pitcher, no question about it; however, he’s not a hall of famer. He’s in the same class of guys like Orel Hershiser and Jack Morris-guys who were tough competitors and aces, but for one reason or another just not hall worthy.

  54. Eric26 January 10th, 2009 at 11:13 am

    This was an excellent guest post. Possibly the most touching of them all. We need more guest posters like this!

  55. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Staying to write the story January 10th, 2009 at 11:14 am

    Someone got me a baseball signed by David Cone and dated 7.18.99 for my 14 birthday =D.

    Coney spelt my name wrong, it was funny.

    And I’m okay with the sappy posts. Hell, I wrote one.

  56. GreenBeret7 January 10th, 2009 at 11:14 am

    He’s also in the same class as Curt Schilling and John Smoltz. Almost a HOFer.

  57. Zachary Hirsch January 10th, 2009 at 11:16 am

    Hey. I wrote the post and I really enjoy the feedback thus far. I am still going into finance, but I would love to be a sportswriter one day. The feedback provided has helped me and I would love some more. I can also be reach at zachirsch@aol.com if you have any suggestions or recommendations you would like to tell me in email. Thanks again and go Yanks!

    -Zac H

  58. Jonny B January 10th, 2009 at 11:17 am

    Great post! Keep it up Zac!

  59. GreenBeret7 January 10th, 2009 at 11:22 am

    Rebecca–Optimist Prime–Staying to write the story
    January 10th, 2009 at 11:14 am
    Someone got me a baseball signed by David Cone and dated 7.18.99 for my 14 birthday =D.

    Coney spelt my name wrong, it was funny.

    And I’m okay with the sappy posts. Hell, I wrote one.

    ————————————————————

    I seen absolutely nothing wrong with people posting the favorite memories of a Yankee fan growing up. People do it in everyday posts on this blog all the time and nobody says a word. The only difference is, except for one poster, they’re not all as long and in depth. I’ve enjoyed all of the ones not posted by the two hate clowns. I’d write my own if I had spell check and grammar assistance.

  60. GreenBeret7 January 10th, 2009 at 11:51 am

    You have to give the Red Sox credit for one thing. No other team would run an old folks convalescent home for injured players. They’ve added another player to their home for decrepit players, Takashi Saito.

  61. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Staying to write the story January 10th, 2009 at 11:55 am

    GB: Maybe the Sox figured out how to fix Social Security…

  62. pat January 10th, 2009 at 11:57 am

    I kinda like Buster’s all free agent team for position players but how did Andy not make this team for pitchers?

    http://sports.espn.go.com/espn.....ney_buster

  63. S.A.-Brian "The Ninja" Cashman: Showing free agents lots of love January 10th, 2009 at 11:57 am

    Nice post Zac.

    That 2001 WS..gosh seems so long ago. I was in England at the time and remember staying up till lord knows when to watch the games. Wish that series ended a bit differently, but oh well.

  64. Pel January 10th, 2009 at 11:59 am

    *Has any ballplayer ever been voted into the Hall of Fame because of one game?*

    *Absolutely not.*

    *There have been 17 perfect games in history, but only 7 of them were thrown by Hall of Famers (or future Hall of Famers).*

    *Its safe to say that Koufax, Bunning, Big Unit, Catfish Hunter, and Cy Young would be in the Hall regardless if they had perfect games on their resumes or not.*

    ========

    I agree, to judge based solely on one game is ridiculous.

    As for the rest of your post, you’re definitely right.

    ========

    *The perfect game should have been mentioned. Certainly, it is not grounds on its own for induction, but it is a “resume-booster” so-to-speak.*

    ========

    That’s exactly how I feel.

    I’m genuinely curious as to what the value of a perfect game is when it comes to HoF consideration.

    Assuming a pitcher is borderline by every usual measure alone, does a perfect game put him over the line and into Cooperstown?

  65. Andrea January 10th, 2009 at 12:05 pm

    I thought we were done insulting pinch hitters.

  66. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Staying to write the story January 10th, 2009 at 12:05 pm

    Pel: I think they look at a perfect game like a no hitter, and when you consider that some pitchers that have pitched no hitters have gone on to throw less-than-Hall-of-Fame careers, it makes sense.

    Things happen. Sometimes everything goes absolutely right.

    Is Coney a HoF candidate?

    I don’t think so, but, honestly, if he were to put anything on his resume, I’d go with the anuerisym in 1996 and nearly pitching through that before the perfect game.

  67. Betsy January 10th, 2009 at 12:08 pm

    http://www.mlbtraderumors.com/.....gn-sa.html

    I don’t know much about this guy. I’ve read on other boards that he has nasty stuff, but it sounds like he underwent some type of weird experimental surgery and may need TJ surgery.

    I already see the gushing on other boards that is taking place – the Sox sign 4 “flyer” guys and they are geniuses. If the Yankees did that, they’d be call mad. Why is it that people assume that when the Sox sign injured players that the players will come back fine? If the Yankees do that, the players will remain injured.

  68. Tom January 10th, 2009 at 12:10 pm

    Saito needed TJ surguery, instead, had stem cells injected into his elbow.

  69. Neil January 10th, 2009 at 12:11 pm

    Schilling will be inducted into the “blowhard wing” in Cooperstown.
    The HOF Committee will not allow a speech consisting of long winded fodder and jibberish but will allow him to tip his cap and will show a 5-second clip of him on the mound demonstrating the ketchup sock.

  70. Garym(Yanks and More) January 10th, 2009 at 12:14 pm

    You have to remember the posts are limited 200-500 words and no one wants to just write about free agents or anything since Pete normally does that. I think everyone is doing a good job, the point is to get a sample of their work and then check out their blog yourself and see what you think. It is very nice of Pete to give everyone this oppurtunity. If you have anything critical to say you should take it up with the guest blogger in their blog.

  71. Rebecca--Optimist Prime--Staying to write the story January 10th, 2009 at 12:15 pm

    Betsy: It all depends on your point of view.

  72. GreenBeret7 January 10th, 2009 at 12:16 pm

    Rebecca–Optimist Prime–Staying to write the story
    January 10th, 2009 at 11:55 am
    GB: Maybe the Sox figured out how to fix Social Security…

    ————————————————————

    They’ll be drawing social security and a paycheck at the same time. Henry must have been hit hard from the hedge fund scandals. Looks like somebody was better at graft and corruption than him.

  73. GreenBeret7 January 10th, 2009 at 12:18 pm

    Tom
    January 10th, 2009 at 12:10 pm
    Saito needed TJ surguery, instead, had stem cells injected into his elbow.

    ————————————————————

    Doesn’t sound much different that HGH experiments.

  74. Pel January 10th, 2009 at 12:29 pm

    *I don’t think so, but, honestly, if he were to put anything on his resume, I’d go with the aneurysm in 1996 and nearly pitching through that before the perfect game.*

    ========

    I’m totally with you on that.

  75. DT January 10th, 2009 at 12:38 pm

    Wow! The Red Sox take on another flyer. GO Theo GO… lol
    Next we’ll read the Sox have hired a voodoo doctor.

    “The deal’s worth between $1.5 and $2.5MM in 2009, but Saito could earn up to $7MM if he pitches well.”

    With all these incentive contracts –
    Here is my question – When team salary is calculated do they figure in just the base salaries or the incentive part as well?

    For example: The Sox could claim their team salary is 110 mil – (helping sell the “underdog” – low budget status) – but if you figured in the incentive clauses for Smoltz, Penny, Baldelli etc… it would probably push it up another 10-15 mil.

    I would think luxury tax etc… would have to be calculated after all these extras have been added in. No?

  76. Angel - A tale told by idiots, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing January 10th, 2009 at 12:41 pm

    “…but pretty repetitive, unoriginal, and pointless.”

    I love how people can say they didn’t mean to be offensive after they’ve typed something like that. Its not exactly constructive criticism, is it?

    Sheesh. Just rude.

  77. Steve in Bismarck January 10th, 2009 at 12:41 pm

    DT – I think luxury tax is figured after the season is done. So it would take into account the incentives only if they are reached.

  78. Angel - A tale told by idiots, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing January 10th, 2009 at 12:42 pm

    Nice job, Zac.

  79. Angel - A tale told by idiots, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing January 10th, 2009 at 12:47 pm

    “There isnt that much to say in response to the post. Ive tried. We could start recalling our favorite moments but frankly, that doesnt really make for interesting conversation or spark discussion.”

    This is a blog which means its what you make of it. Just because you have decided that a discussion can’t be made out of a post because it doesn’t interest you specifically doesn’t mean its the case.

    For a self admitted *new* poster around here, you sure sound a bit dictatorial.

  80. Noreaster January 10th, 2009 at 12:47 pm

    Sorry for the late post but to add a couple of things to the topics at hand. I would have to say, as a Yankee fan living outside of Boston, that the 2001 series is the best seriesI ever was a fan for. It is certainly not my favorite, and is still a painful memory, but it was the best that I have seen.

    As for Cone as a HOF’er. I look at it this way, the Boston Media will be all over putting Schilling in the HOF. Cone is 194-126 (68 games over 500) with a 3.46 ERA (Pitching mostly in the AL) and 2668 SO. Schilling is 216-146 (70 games over 500) with a 3.46 ERA (Pitching mostly in the NL) and 3116 strikeouts. Cone had 3 great seasons, Schilling had 3 great seasons.

    I think they both fall short of greatness. I’m sure Gammons will lead the charge to get Schilling in so maybe to be fair we should look more closely at Cone?

  81. Rob NY January 10th, 2009 at 12:48 pm

    I am so nauseated by all the Theo gushing when he is signing injury prone and old players. I love Rocco Baldelli, we know this, but the way some people are holding him up as a genius move is beyond me.

    The boy genius missed out on his prized piece and has since been shopping at K-Mart. Nothing brilliant about that.

  82. Angel - A tale told by idiots, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing January 10th, 2009 at 12:51 pm

    “The boy genius missed out on his prized piece and has since been shopping at K-Mart. Nothing brilliant about that.”

    Haha, thanks Rob for the laugh. That was amusing.

  83. jennifer January 10th, 2009 at 12:55 pm

    The Red Sox medical staff is always mentioned as the best in Baseball. They will have to prove that they are this year with Smoltz, penny, Rocco and now Saito.

    Posted by: Kramerica Industries | January 10, 2009 at 10:44 AM

    —————-

    This has to be the funniest comment. Ask Curt ‘red light’ Schilling, what he thinks about the Red Soxs medical staff.

  84. jennifer January 10th, 2009 at 12:57 pm

    Rob NY

    I spoke to a friend who is a red sox fan last night. I asked him what he thought about what Peter Gammons said about Penny being as good as AJ. He laughed said he was nuts, that he’d much rather have AJ. He also can’t understand all these ‘cheapo’ signings the red soxs are making.

  85. jennifer January 10th, 2009 at 12:58 pm

    Let’s see, $5 for Penny, $5 for Smoltz, $2 for Saito, $.5 million for Baldelli…that’s where Theo wanted to spend the $12.5 million, instead of on Teixeira.

    He lives or dies with that decision (well, among reasonable folk anyway. Sox fans will simply claim “bad luck” if these signings don’t propel the Sox to the postseason).

    Posted by: AndrewYF | January 10, 2009 at 10:59 AM

    ————-

    haha so true.

  86. Rob NY January 10th, 2009 at 1:00 pm

    Jennifer– Yeah Penny can be good, last year his ERA+ was 151, but he isn’t the pitcher AJ is. He just isn’t by any stretch of the imagination. AJ is a power pitching strikeout pitcher who has been tested on a 3rd place and worse team in the AL Beast. Penny pitched in Florida and moved to an even worse division. Gammons is a Homer. Maybe that’ll be my new tagline “Rob NY– Gammons is a Homer!!!111!1!!! “

  87. Russell NY January 10th, 2009 at 1:02 pm

    Lets not go crazy… if the Yankees signed Smoltz, Penny, Saito and Baldelli REAL cheap we would be celebrating. Even if players make full with all the incentives Boston still got a steal with the total money being paid out.

    That being said, everyone likes to say “All these players are a luxury to the Red Sox.” Well I disagree. When Youkilis, Pedroia, Dice-K, and Lester regress this year (regression from unreal last year is still good) they will be NEEDING some of these players to come through.

    Baldelli isn’t scary but the other 3 guys can be pretty damn good if healthy. However, none of them particularly scare me. Smoltz is an old man with shoulder surgery and despite Saito only pitching 3 years in the majors so far lets not forget he was born in 1970, had health issues last year, and was rejected by the Dodgers this year. Not to mention he was pitching against the Giants all season :)

  88. Noreaster January 10th, 2009 at 1:07 pm

    Jennifer – The other thing that drives me crazy about Gammons comment on Penny is that if he signed with the Yankees, he would have brought up the fact that he has never pitched in the ALEast. Penny is fat, coming off the DL and has never pitched in the ALEast. AJ has ++ stuff, is coming off his best year and is an ALEast vet. Exactly how can Penny be as good?

  89. GreenBeret7 January 10th, 2009 at 1:08 pm

    Angel – A tale told by idiots, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing
    January 10th, 2009 at 12:47 pm
    “There isnt that much to say in response to the post. Ive tried. We could start recalling our favorite moments but frankly, that doesnt really make for interesting conversation or spark discussion.”

    This is a blog which means its what you make of it. Just because you have decided that a discussion can’t be made out of a post because it doesn’t interest you specifically doesn’t mean its the case.

    For a self admitted new poster around here, you sure sound a bit dictatorial.

    ————————————————————

    Angel, you’ll have to disregard Ol’ Dave’s rantings. He’s in love with seeing his words in print. Don’t worry, though…if you missed anything he’s said, don’t be concerned, bedcause you’ll see the same windbag spouting at least 5 times a day.

  90. pat January 10th, 2009 at 1:12 pm

    Has Boston given all these “bargains” major league deals? Current roster is at 39 and Seito brings it to 40.

    They either need to do a 3+ player trade for a catcher to free up sapce to add Smoltz,Kotsay and a catcher, another major league contract trade for prospects or they are going to need to start just kicking people loose.

  91. Noreaster January 10th, 2009 at 1:16 pm

    The talk on EEI is that they may just be getting ready to deal a young arm or two for a catcher of the future.

  92. Betsy January 10th, 2009 at 1:21 pm

    The sooner this off-season ends, the sooner I’ll be very happy, lol. It’s like this is the Sox and Yankees world and everyone else is just living in it!

    This could work out well for the Sox or it could not……I don’t know what the Yankees thought process is except that I would say that they are very satisfied with the bullpen options they already have. I can understand that. They have spent an awful lot of $$ on improving their team (which they had to do – they were already behind the Sox in terms of pitching) and they have a couple of other issues they need to deal with first before spending extra $$$ on the pen.

  93. IB6 UB9 January 10th, 2009 at 4:33 pm

    My best memories of the 2001 WS were:

    - the Diamondback fan holding up a sign on the network broadcast saying ‘It will take more than 9 Yanks to beat our Johnson!’

    - the early 2002 interleague game against Arizona when the fans starting chanting, “Put in Kim! Put in Kim!”

    Otherwise it stunk.

  94. Joey2689 January 10th, 2009 at 9:35 pm

    Great post Zac. “Yankee magic” is something that is taken for granted by Yankee fans. It seems to surround the franchise.

  95. jett January 10th, 2009 at 10:19 pm

    For anyone who’s sick of hearing that the Yankees buy their championships, take a look at this article:

    http://riveravereview.blogspot.....r-way.html

  96. Brian January 11th, 2009 at 12:12 am

    Let’s put things in perspective, once and for all. The “Cathedral” was torn down and replaced within with another ballpark, with similar, although less lenient dimensions (and in the same place) during the renovation. The new ballpark did not have many of the features (facade, shadows, wind currents, sitelines, full bleachers) that us baby boomers and the fathers that took us to it when we were little. It was neither the Babe’s, nor Gehrig’s, noe DiMaggio’s. nor Yogi’s, nor Mickey Mantle’s nor Roger Maris’ ballpark. It was something else, rebuilt on the same property with a fake facade that was “moved” to the outfield. And don’t forget that we lost players to the Shea swamp, while the old stadium was being reconstructed (not renovated, in reality) of top of its wobbly frame. (A public hazard.) The new stadium is, MAYBE, a worthy successor to the magnificent and old 1923 model. (Funny how it took almost the same amount of time to build the new one now as it did to “renovate” the old one in the mid 1970s.) The question now is how to adjust the team to the new economic reality of the country and to humanize the stadium seating configuration so that it brings in, rather than excludes, the fans, the people, who supported the Yankees through the years…and flocked to them when the Dodgers and the Giants deserted the city and region. But I wonder if anyone is sufficiently awake to take the initiative.

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