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Any truth to the A-Rod tips?

Posted by: Peter Abraham - Posted in Misc on Jun 03, 2009 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

The book Selena Roberts did on Alex Rodriguez has largely been discredited. But the tabloid-style book did raise questions when she alleged that A-Rod tipped pitches to opponents in lopsided games while a member of the Rangers.

The Inside Corner sports blog of D Magazine examined the issue and the research that Roberts did not. Evan Grant, a former Rangers beat writer, wrote the following:

Miguel Tejada, then with Oakland, hit .350 overall against the Rangers, but jumped to .472 when the margin was at least five runs either way. He had nine homers in 36 at-bats when the margin was at least five. Rodriguez, who hit .284 against Oakland overall, hit .333 when the score was five or greater.

Seattle’s Carlos Guillen, a teammate of Rodriguez’s for three seasons with the Mariners, went from .307 to .318. in “out of hand” situations. Rodriguez, however, jumped from .264 to .391 against the Mariners in those situations.

Rangers manager Ron Washington, who was with Oakland at the time, was once called to a staff meeting because an A’s coach suspected Tejada was tipping pitches to opponents.

Washington did not believe it and still doesn’t. It’s a matter of personal interpretation whether those statistics are damning or not. But it is worth noting that Alex is one of those hitters who wants to know what is coming. He watches video endlessly to try and educate himself about what pitch a pitcher will throw him in certain situations.

Some hitting coaches have said it almost becomes a weakness because Alex can get frozen by a breaking pitch when he is looking for a fastball. Other hitters, such as Derek Jeter and Robinson Cano, focus more on themselves and their ability to react to whatever pitch is thrown.

There are two schools of thought. Some hitters like playing the guessing game, others just want to wait and react. Alex always has been an advocate of preparation and you certainly can’t question his accomplishments, at least in terms of the statistics he has amassed.

Tejada, like Rodriguez, is an admitted PED user. He lied to Congress about it and copped a plea when he was accused of perjury. Would players who cheat by using PEDs also be willing to cheat by telling each other what was coming?

That’s a question we will probably never get an answer to. But the research Grant did certainly is interesting.

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145 Responses to “Any truth to the A-Rod tips?”

  1. Someone Else June 3rd, 2009 at 10:42 am

    Give me a break.

    Do you know who pitches when the game is out of hand?

    Warner Madrigal, Kris Benson, Brett Tomko, and Jose Veras.

    What do you think is more likely, good hitters destroying bad pitchers, or players cheating?

    Get off the witch hunt. It’s ugly.

  2. Swisher For President June 3rd, 2009 at 10:42 am

    Interesting stats but the word on A-Rod has always been his ability to hit, especially home runs, when the game is out of reach.

  3. Benny Blanco June 3rd, 2009 at 10:42 am

    YAWN!!!

  4. CM June 3rd, 2009 at 10:42 am

    Have nothing to say on this issue. I just want to know if anyone has audio of Sterling calling Matsui’s HR last night and accidentally starting to call it “An A-Bomb from A-Rod”. Classic, hilarious stuff.

  5. mrvigs013 June 3rd, 2009 at 10:43 am

    Pete why would you even bring this up again??? Sometimes I wonder why we even listen to the media…I mean if there isn’t a problem they just like to make one up…Tejeda at the time was one of the best hitting SS in baseball, there could be many reason why he hit so high against the rangers. Would it be because the Rangers always had horriable pitching staff’s..Why continue to give that HACK Salina Roberts any press is beyond me…..

  6. Cam June 3rd, 2009 at 10:44 am

    While this could support that accusation, it also could simply be that the pitchers start to throw more fastballs over the plate in “out of hand” situations, something always talked about on baseball broadcasts. You have a large lead? Forget nibbling and just go after guys. A very tough thing to prove unless someone admits to it.

  7. mike June 3rd, 2009 at 10:45 am

    I would love to see the quality of the pitchers those guys fattened their stats on as well – the Rangers have always had crap pitching, and I’m sure the ‘pen was emptied out in a blow-out game.

    Also, I wonder why no one is looking at ARod’s former BFF Jeter’s stats when they played against eachother…..

    This is all nonsense, and Roberts has now, for the second time (Duke), taken a small fact and blown it out of proportion without consideration for the ramifications to those she is indicting

  8. Bronx Jeers June 3rd, 2009 at 10:45 am

    Interesting stuff.

    I’ll play public defender and point out that often when the game is “out of hand”, these batters are usually facing scrubs.

  9. Patrick June 3rd, 2009 at 10:45 am

    Grant is just playing with numbers. You could find a zillion examples of players that hit better vs certain teams when the difference in score is 5+.

    It’s possible A-rod was tipping pitches but Grant’s research doesn’t sway me one way or another. It’s pretty irrelevant to look at a handful of players and attempt to draw any meaningful conclusion.

    Also, this:

    “Do you know who pitches when the game is out of hand?

    Warner Madrigal, Kris Benson, Brett Tomko, and Jose Veras.”

  10. tony June 3rd, 2009 at 10:46 am

    isn’t it possible that since the game was out of hand the back end of the bullpen was in the game and probably just throwing fastballs. Couldn’t this make their avgs. jump…but I guess its a better story to have A-Rod possibly tipping pitches.

  11. Paco Dooley June 3rd, 2009 at 10:46 am

    I want someone to show numbers that compare these same situations for him or other players in similar situations. Teams bring in cleanup guys to pitch in those games, and so most players stats probably jump up in blowout situations. Plus, some players feel less pressure and perform better.

    As a statistician, I get upset seeing someone present claims that these numbers are meaningful without them comparing the numbers to some relevant metric (how the same or other players do in similar situations against other teams). They should also have some statistical statement about whether such shifts are significant, or can be due to chance variation given the small number of at bats. These numbers are meaningless without such comparisons.

  12. jennifer June 3rd, 2009 at 10:47 am

    exactly garbage pitchers pitch when the game is out of hand. Also if you have a large margin, you just throw the ball over the plate trying to get outs. You aren’t going to get into a 3-2 count (well unless you are Jose Veras).

    Enough already with this garbage.

  13. Harlan June 3rd, 2009 at 10:49 am

    The NY Times published this analysis, concluding that A-Rod either did not tip pitches, or was ineffective in doing so.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05.....038;st=cse

  14. Jeff NJ - Everyday Aceves June 3rd, 2009 at 10:49 am

    can we get a new post Peter? This topic is old news and boring.

  15. JP June 3rd, 2009 at 10:49 am

    Statistics can be made to show just about anything you want. Obviously we all know that a game where one team is up by 5 or more runs late is a different animal from a close/late game.

    Pete, here’s the story I really want to read:

    What exactly did Alex do to you personally that you constantly feel the need to toe the line between journalism and personal vendetta? It’s a real shame, because I generally enjoy your writing, but it just gets to be a bit much.

  16. Brandon ? Is Berroa really starting today ???? June 3rd, 2009 at 10:49 am

    Will it ever be put to rest ?

  17. Slu June 3rd, 2009 at 10:50 am

    Small Sample Size.

    And I like how now the book is “largely discredited”. You didn’t talk like that when it was released.

  18. Peter Abraham June 3rd, 2009 at 10:51 am

    Actually, if you were a “garbage” pitcher being used in such circumstances, wouldn’t you try and pitch well to improve your status within the game? I would doubt you would just groove BP fastballs to good hitters.

    Those statistics are interesting and there is research behind them, they literally examined every single game.

  19. 86w183 June 3rd, 2009 at 10:52 am

    I agree Patrick, the selective stats are meaningless on their face. I suspect most guys hit better in “out of hand” situations because the pitcher with the big lead is just throwing strikes and the hitter has no pressure. If you are UP by a lot, you are probably facing a crappy pitcher.

    Without comparing it to ALL opponents it is a selective attempt to smear a guy — or in this case two or three guys — something we have learned to expect.

  20. Jon Ringland June 3rd, 2009 at 10:52 am

    The Sterling/Matsui call was priceless: NNNNit is high, NNNNNit is far, NNNniiiiiiit is GONE! Oh! Its an A-Bomb………well……it would have been if Alex had hit it” Oh John…

    Someone Else,

    You hit the nail on the head. Good hitters crush bad pitchers, who have a propensity to pitch in mop-up roles. I never thought I would sympathize with A-Rod, on anything, ever, bc I think he’s a monumental d*uche, but get off his back already.

  21. Jon Ringland June 3rd, 2009 at 10:53 am

    “if you were a “garbage” pitcher being used in such circumstances, wouldn’t you try and pitch well to improve your status within the game?”

    If you’re a garbage pitcher, your stats will suck regardless of how hard you’re trying, because you’re a garbage pitcher.

  22. Peter Abraham June 3rd, 2009 at 10:54 am

    JP:

    Please try and think intelligently. I posted a link to an interesting story. So that means I hate Alex because he did something to me? Such as what exactly?

    I posted statistics that reflected well on Jeter last night when he reached a milestone. Does that mean he bought be a car?

    That’s not how it works. I see some interesting or I find out something interesting, I post it.

  23. Joe June 3rd, 2009 at 10:54 am

    what a waste of time and resources to keep harping on this issue

  24. Hola June 3rd, 2009 at 10:54 am

    The pitch-tipping nonsense – whose source was hearsay passed along by Shane Spencer – has already been shot down by not just Michael Young, a few other players (IIRC) & Buck Showalter, and if you buy into the approach taken by the author, also by statistics as linked above.

    Enough, Pete. This horse is dead & buried already.

  25. bru June 3rd, 2009 at 10:54 am

    it doesn’t matter much because nobody is going to admit it.
    how can we waste time on something we will never know?

    it would not suprise me.this story will never amount to anything & has already gone away.

  26. Someone Else June 3rd, 2009 at 10:56 am

    “Actually, if you were a “garbage” pitcher being used in such circumstances, wouldn’t you try and pitch well to improve your status within the game? I would doubt you would just groove BP fastballs to good hitters.

    Those statistics are interesting and there is research behind them, they literally examined every single game.”

    Do you honestly, truly, believe this? Will you post a rebuttal when I have time to put one together?

    My hypothesis: ARod crushed the A’s mop up pitchers, did before he played for the Rangers, and has since. His numbers against them were much better than against the A’s good pitchers.

    It boggles my mind how someone can be so blind to their bias. You’re an intelligent guy, and then you post stuff like this.

  27. Slu June 3rd, 2009 at 10:56 am

    Harlan, thanks for the link to statistical analysis that at least has some scientific merit rather than some cherry picked stats.

    Where was the LoHud link to the NY Times study?

  28. mikeboston June 3rd, 2009 at 10:56 am

    Totally agree with the points made here, the numbers increase because in blow outs the pitchers used are the scrubby mop up guys. Hitters like them guys feast on mediocre pitchers period!

  29. Bronx Jeers June 3rd, 2009 at 10:56 am

    “Have nothing to say on this issue. I just want to know if anyone has audio of Sterling calling Matsui’s HR last night and accidentally starting to call it “An A-Bomb from A-Rod”. Classic, hilarious stuff.”

    ————————————————————-

    Sterling’s got problems but if we combine his Arod call with the info in Pete’s post, does Sterling change his HR call?

    “It’s a CIA ground agent called in laser-guided smart A-Bomb, from A-Rod ! “

  30. SJ44 June 3rd, 2009 at 10:57 am

    I was out last night and had to Tivo the game. I was subjected to Sterling’s radio call of the game.

    He couldn’t have butchered Matsui’s HR call any worse.

    He’s been Jose Veras level awful this year.

    As far as Arod tipping pitches, nothing to see here. It didn’t happen. Its been discredited by Michael Young, other, more exhaustive research, and just about anybody who didn’t have an axe to grind against the guy.

    Its a nice way to play with numbers and say, “Hey, I’m just pointing some things out”. However, there is ZERO factual evidence it happened.

  31. Coach6423 June 3rd, 2009 at 10:57 am

    Anything about Arod is to Pete, as Joba to the pen is to Francessa

  32. Someone Else June 3rd, 2009 at 10:57 am

    “That’s not how it works. I see some interesting or I find out something interesting, I post it.”

    How many times is this ‘interesting’ thing going to be something that just happens to be anti-ARod?

    I don’t recall you linking to the NY Times analysis. That was certainly interesting.

  33. juan luis guerra June 3rd, 2009 at 10:57 am

    You know what else Arod and Miguel Tejada and for that reason, geronimo berroa have in common? They all come from the Dominican Republic…Its easy to pick on the dominicans isnt it?

  34. Hola June 3rd, 2009 at 10:59 am

    From what I’ve seen, labeling a “blowout” game is arbitrary, and when you adjust for pitching talent, ballpark factors and the like, what you end up with isn’t mathematically & statistically sound.

    Therefore, you can’t prove anything either way using stats.

    In addition, even if you could show intent using statistics, the BA gain would be inconsequential over the course of an entire season.

    So, setting stats aside I’d go with what fellow players said, emphatically may I add, and also that the sourcing of the original story was unbelievably weak.

  35. Voodoo Chile June 3rd, 2009 at 10:59 am

    How about we focus on the Hooters girls, and their plight? After all, Alex only tipped them 15%.

    If we’re going to run a story into the ground, let’s do one where we use statistics to determine if the girls’ chest sizes are artificially enhanced or not.

    I volunteer to gather the #s.

  36. jstuddle June 3rd, 2009 at 10:59 am

    When a game is out of hand, generally that means that the pitcher blows and the hitters are facing long relief and in some cases even Nick Swisher.

  37. Drew June 3rd, 2009 at 10:59 am

    5 runs is “out of hand”? So if it’s 6-1 in the third inning, the game’s over? These guys would supposedly be tipping pitches then? This is all so Machiavellian. What? Did Tejeda and A-Rod have a special “5 run or more” rule? Once the game got beyond the massive lead of five runs, they would do a little head nod and say, “Here we go.” This type of reporting is irresponsible at best, even if every writer does the soft caveat of, “Hey, we may never know, but…..”

    Here’s another flaw in that reporting. All we get are averages. A-Rod jumped from .284 to .333 in blowouts against the Oakland As. Are you kidding me? His average jumped .049? We don’t even know how many at-bats that was. Let’s assume it was a total of 20 at-bats, which seems like too many, but what does that mean? It means that…woop…woop….A-Rod had ONE MORE HIT than when he was in non-blowout games. If A-Rod was getting pitches tipped, I’d expect his average to be like .850 in those situations.

    C’mon. This is just absurd.

  38. mikeboston June 3rd, 2009 at 11:00 am

    Meant to say: Hitters like those guys feast on mediocre pitchers period!

    Had to do this before the grammar cops showed up ;)

  39. Someone Else June 3rd, 2009 at 11:00 am

    Now I’m waiting for the derogatory “we’re all blind sycophants who worship ARod and will defend him no matter what” comment that’s bound to appear.

  40. Tom in N.J. June 3rd, 2009 at 11:00 am

    Pete, I did see you driving a burnt orange Ford Edge the other day….

    In all seriousness, I’m not sure what these stats prove-other than the fact that mop-up men got shelled in blow-outs.

  41. IDCWYT June 3rd, 2009 at 11:01 am

    So who’s your favorite Yankee radio anouncer of all time?

    I’m only 29, so there may have been other great ones that I never listened to, but Charlie Steiner was my favorite.

  42. mko June 3rd, 2009 at 11:01 am

    For an article with a different conclusion, read this:
    riveraveblues.com/2009/05/if-a-rod-tipped-pitches-it-didnt-work-11808/

  43. Observer283 June 3rd, 2009 at 11:01 am

    Perfectly said, Ringland. Of course garbage pitchers are going to try hard every time out. But there’s a reason we call tehm “garbage pitchers.” They are not very good. Furthermore, many bad pitchers are bad because of control issues. These guys, its seems to me, are MUCH more likely to throw a fastball in a blow-out when they are behind in the count than other pitchers. Do you think Joe Girardi is happy when Veras walks someone on a 3-1 curveball when the yankes have 5+ run lead? These guys now their coaches will be more upset if they give up a walk rather than a homerun in a blow out situation. So, I would presume these guys would try to throw more hittable strikes.

  44. bru June 3rd, 2009 at 11:01 am

    i just traded cueto & jurjens for lincecum in my fantasy league.

    did i get burned?

    i have mlb trade analyzer software & it said i did a lille better.

  45. DB - (officially panicked 5/13/09) June 3rd, 2009 at 11:02 am

    Some more circumstantial BS…talk to us when someone actually fesses up to it or you have visual proof.

    I know this is the correct forum for discussion of stuff like this, but I was hoping for a nice post on Tex or the winning streak or some nice tid bits on what Posada said to Veras.

    Nice rain on the parade, Pete

  46. Commish June 3rd, 2009 at 11:02 am

    Pete-

    So, they analyzed every game and only 2 compelling examples came up? Seems like much ado about nothing. And it’s not about bad pitchers grooving BP fastballs. It’s about bad pitchers being what they are….bad.

    How about you mention the NY Times piece too? Seems they analyzed every game and came to a different conclusion.

  47. DB - (officially panicked 5/13/09) June 3rd, 2009 at 11:03 am

    Bru, I wouldn’t have made that trade…two B+ guys for an elite is kind of risky to begin with but you just halved your stats.

  48. Oh man. June 3rd, 2009 at 11:04 am

    There is barely one poster here willing to acknowledge the possibility. I would be open to it if I thought there was enough data. For now, it just seems obvious that when a game is out of hand, the hitter is more relaxed and the pitcher is less competent. What are Pujols’ stats, comparitively speaking?

    I do not doubt your integrity Pete – I think this place is fantastic and I’m embarrassed at how many times I hit the refresh button … but this particular story feels too subjective and slanted. I understand why you posted it, but it doesn’t pass the test.

  49. andrew33 June 3rd, 2009 at 11:04 am

    Pete couldn’t it be there were more fastballs thrown or the pitcher was just challenging hitters because the game had moved into the “blow-out” stage. This to me seems a bit absurd, I’m not a big Arod fan but come on Michael Young discredited it. If you are going to break-down stats like this can we get some information on Big Papi from his Minnesota days vs the Boston years.

  50. Someone Else June 3rd, 2009 at 11:05 am

    “Here’s another flaw in that reporting. All we get are averages. A-Rod jumped from .284 to .333 in blowouts against the Oakland As. Are you kidding me? His average jumped .049? We don’t even know how many at-bats that was. Let’s assume it was a total of 20 at-bats, which seems like too many, but what does that mean? It means that…woop…woop….A-Rod had ONE MORE HIT than when he was in non-blowout games. If A-Rod was getting pitches tipped, I’d expect his average to be like .850 in those situations.

    C’mon. This is just absurd.”

    Agreed, its absurd. And wasn’t Brantley on the record that the Rangers had a player that would get on 1st and tip pitches to Alex? I believe Alex had INSANE numbers when that guy was on base.

  51. Jon Ringland June 3rd, 2009 at 11:05 am

    “we’re all blind sycophants who worship ARod and will defend him no matter what”

    Fanboys, Someone Else, fanboys :)

  52. Sony June 3rd, 2009 at 11:05 am

    I love how nobody cares about this A-Rod stuff anymore. Seriously, I do. This is how it was on the dynasty teams. Not every player on those teams was a perfect citizen, but the few “problem children” were surrounded by good guys, a winning attitude, and a manager who knew how to minimize their PR gaffes. If A-Rod can be reduced to a minor headache and not a splitting migraine – while hitting like A-Rod – I’ll be the happiest fan in the world.

  53. bru June 3rd, 2009 at 11:05 am

    deangelo :

    a little harsh don’t you think?

  54. GET REAL June 3rd, 2009 at 11:06 am

    Someone said “witch hunt”…that sounds about right in this situation…

  55. jennifer June 3rd, 2009 at 11:07 am

    I am of the mind set that you can make statistics say anything you want. That “analysis” cherry picked stats that fit their agenda, which was to ‘show’ that Alex tipped pitches. Tell us what pitchers they got all those hits off of.

  56. Eddie June 3rd, 2009 at 11:07 am

    As many have posted before me already…of course these good hitter’s averages will all go up playing in blowout games b/c the underbelly of the bullpen is in…we see this night in and night out with the Yanks pen. If Aceves/Mo are not in, guys tee off On the Coke/veras/Robertson/ramirez/tomko etc…I am a scientist and I manage data all the time…you can make numbers work anyway you want them too. Since E. Grant’s research was so thorough I would love to see the list of pitchers who these hits came off of…I’m sure the vast majority are retreads/bums.

  57. islesfan June 3rd, 2009 at 11:07 am

    A “garbage” pitcher doesn’t need to groove pitches to a great hitter to be hit harder than a typical starting pitcher.

    You said it yourself pertaining to Joba, you want your best pitchers starting, they certainly don’t mop up games that are out of hand. Doesn’t it stand to reason that great hitters would fare better against guys mopping up games, no matter how hard they were trying, than against starters?

    Aren’t mopup guys also told to throw strikes so as not to walk batters and give up bases?

    Gotta love a good witch hunt. Still waiting for those other 103 names.

  58. 86w183 June 3rd, 2009 at 11:07 am

    Red Barber and Mel Allen are so much better than anyone who has ever done Yankees PBP it’s immeasurable.

    For color I loved Jim Kaat and O’Neill is terrific if he would just work more games and Kay would stop trying to make every telecast about him. Hey Michael… you have a big head, we get it, give it a reast an dcall the game please.

    Letting Sterling/Waldman call the Yankee games is like making Veras and Tomko the # 1 and # 2 starters… pure instanity.

  59. Richie June 3rd, 2009 at 11:08 am

    The leap of illogical reasoning that it takes to compare Tejada, who as you say “lied to Congress,” with A-Rod, who admitted that he used steroids, is worthy of an Olympic gold medal.

  60. Someone Else June 3rd, 2009 at 11:08 am

    Pujols is remarkably consistent regardless of game situation. But I’m sure we could cherrypick a team that he pwned in blowouts over a 3 year time span.

  61. bru June 3rd, 2009 at 11:09 am

    DB:

    i was thinking the exact same thing about the stats but i am on an innings cap of 1400 in wich i have 900 left with

    edwin jackson
    lincecum
    sabathia
    porcello
    wakefield
    volquez
    webb
    escobar

    in addition to my relievers.

  62. Kevin S. June 3rd, 2009 at 11:11 am

    Pete, it was a thirty-six AB sample. Do you know what that tells us? Not a thing. It’s not interesting, it’s stupid, and far more exhaustive studies have been done, including two linked in this thread, that thoroughly discredit the idea.

  63. bru June 3rd, 2009 at 11:11 am

    webb should be back by the asb,escobar will be activated soon,volquez on the dl.

    i meant to do a cueto & jurjens for lincecum & lester but messed up.

    i think i am ok though.

  64. Cash is King June 3rd, 2009 at 11:11 am

    Yankee fans are feeling good about their team and I don’t understand why this issue had to be brought up again.

  65. Jon Ringland June 3rd, 2009 at 11:12 am

    “Yankee fans are feeling good about their team and I don’t understand why this issue had to be brought up again.”

    Most intelligent post thus far.

  66. Steve B (Wouldn't it be cool if AJ's ERA was 3.14) June 3rd, 2009 at 11:12 am

    Statistical sample seems a little too small to draw conclusions, but I have absolutely no problem believing Rodriguez did exactly what’s suggested. Just seems that type of guy.

    That said, there’s no proof of it and there likely will never be proof of it. Further, had he engaged in such shenanigans, he obviously was not alone in doing so.

  67. josh June 3rd, 2009 at 11:13 am

    hey pete can you provide some sample sizes on these numbers? I think its a bit incomplete to provide those averages without the amount of at bats each player had. I know youre just quoting another report, but those figures can mean something or nothing at all depending on how many at bats took place in those situations

  68. Laura - Stay in 1st place together, strike out alone! June 3rd, 2009 at 11:13 am

    “If A-Rod can be reduced to a minor headache and not a splitting migraine – while hitting like A-Rod – I’ll be the happiest fan in the world.”

    If you’ve been paying attention, Alex has been on his best behavior since he’s been back. Save for dating Kate Hudson (who gets around a bit too much for my tastes), he’s been all baseball. That is why Pete brought this up. Alex isn’t giving him anything else to write about so he has to go and dig up old news that nobody cared about the first time it was discussed. Pete’s employment is in jeopardy and he’s doing what he can to keep his job. Understandable, but not the noblest thing in the world to do.

  69. Patrick June 3rd, 2009 at 11:14 am

    In response to the last thread.

    SJ44, I would be very interested in a post about the MLB draft once it is over. I love that stuff and anything you post on it will surely be fascinating.

  70. Someone Else June 3rd, 2009 at 11:15 am

    “Jeff Brantley: “I played with A-Rod during that time. I was at Texas. The old Randy Velarde trick. Randy Velarde would get on first base. Of course, Velarde played for the Oakland Athletics [in 1999 and 2000] so he knew everything (sign) that was given behind home plate. Of course, [Ramon] Hernandez was back there at the time and had a little problem of leaving that front knee open and Velarde would get out there just enough to where he could give the pitch to A-Rod. And bada-bing, bada-bang, two, three[-run home run], sometimes grand slam. It happened a lot. There was a week, and you’ll recall this, early in the season of 2001 where A-Rod kind of burst on to the scene where he hit, I think he was the ‘Player of the Week’ and had about nine or ten home runs right out of the chute. Everybody was just marveling at what he was able to do. He didn’t get the call on every pitch but he got most of them. He knew the pitch was coming.””

    http://weblogs.newsday.com/spo.....rod_p.html

  71. Tom in N.J. June 3rd, 2009 at 11:15 am

    Bronx Jeers-

    Also, factor in the ammount of beer that was downed.

    When Alex had one or less High-life he tipped the standered 15%

    However, when the beer was served in pitchers the tips went up substantially. In fact, it was at Hooters that Alex first gained notoriety as a “pitchers tipper”.

  72. bru June 3rd, 2009 at 11:15 am

    deangelo :

    i just think that it is sad to resort to nast insults to get your point across.

    would you teach your kids the same way of thinking?

    i certainly hope not.

  73. 86w183 June 3rd, 2009 at 11:16 am

    Maybe there’s a connection between the Hooter’s “tipping” and the pitch “tipping”. Maybe that should be investigated throughly to see if ARod tipped better when he hit well but didn’t tip when he wasn’t tipped off.

    This is just the TIP of the iceberg folks.

    I’m sure someone will figure out how poorly Alex hits in losses and conclude he bet against the Yankees on those games and the games where he hit well is evdience that he bet ON the Yankees in those situations.

  74. Steve B (Wouldn't it be cool if AJ's ERA was 3.14) June 3rd, 2009 at 11:17 am

    “with A-Rod, who admitted that he used steroids”

    He did lie about it before admitting it. Katie Couric isn’t Congress, but he lied nonetheless. No valor in admitting it after being busted for, which is what happened.

  75. Jon Ringland June 3rd, 2009 at 11:17 am

    “i just think that it is sad to resort to nast insults to get your point across”

    Agreed…such comments shouldn’t even warrant a response

  76. Observer283 June 3rd, 2009 at 11:19 am

    I don’t think anyone can say conclusively that A-Rod did NOT tip pitches. He very well may have. But the point is there has been absolutely NO hard evidence that he has. This research, standing in contradiction to the more exhaustive research done by the New York times, does nothing to change that fact.

    Also, I must say, it’s pretty hard to defend posting this article without ever linking to the NY Times article on the very same issue. I actually can’t possibly think of one reason why it would be OK to post one and not the other. (Maybe because it would be easier for more people to come across the NY Times article?)

  77. Jon Ringland June 3rd, 2009 at 11:19 am

    “Maybe there’s a connection between the Hooter’s “tipping” and the pitch “tipping”. Maybe that should be investigated throughly to see if ARod tipped better when he hit well but didn’t tip when he wasn’t tipped off.

    This is just the TIP of the iceberg folks.”

    hahahahaha well played, i actually laughed out loud on that one.

  78. m June 3rd, 2009 at 11:20 am

    This is a two-man operation which makes it seemingly difficult. But if he could find people to help him out, I wouldn’t be surprised.

    Look at the whistle he used to tell Tex the ball was coming in on that homerun (the one where Tex’s eyes widen in disbelief). Then ever-so-subtle Alex is in the dugout using the “it worked to perfection” hand gesture.

    Re: Sterling’s call. My mom grew up in postwar Japan, so I’ve always hated the call. Why does Sterling get a pass for it in this PC world we live in? I guess the Japanese sponsors don’t listen to the WCBS broadcast. Even they wouldn’t be able to put up with Sterling’s warning track homerun calls!

    I’m glad Sterling screwed up last night. Maybe he’ll come up with something, you know, new and original. Because Alex is going to be around for a long time. On second thought, Sterling won’t be in the booth that long, will he?

  79. Jon Ringland June 3rd, 2009 at 11:22 am

    “Why does Sterling get a pass for it in this PC world we live in? I guess the Japanese sponsors don’t listen to the WCBS broadcast”

    Because, with all respect to your mother, you really would have to be looking for a reason to play that card on him. This was just an unfortunate slip that happened with the wrong guy at the player.

  80. Phranchise June 3rd, 2009 at 11:22 am

    How about the increase in #’s being attributed to it’s a blowout and that probably means there’s some “mop up duty” guy on the hill just trying to throw strikes? Could that lead to better numbers? Texas isn’t exactly known for it’s wealth of pitchers. A reasonable person could determine that if you’re deep into their pen, guys like Tejada and Guillen may be able to tee off. Same goes for Arod, is it hard to imagine he has good numbers against some Seattle middle reliever?

  81. Jon Ringland June 3rd, 2009 at 11:23 am

    *wrong guy at the plate.

  82. The Monk June 3rd, 2009 at 11:23 am

    Actually, it seems A-Rod did tip a pitch last week in Texas — to his teammate. Anyone who watched Sportscenter after the Yanks whacked the Rangers last Monday would have seen the Rick Sutcliffe analysis on Tex’s first inning homer. The catcher set up early, A-Rod may have whistled to Tex to disclose location and Tex whacked one into the left field seats. Interesting analysis by Sutcliffe.

    And if A-Rod’s tipping pitches to Tex, I’ve no problem with that.

  83. Sony June 3rd, 2009 at 11:23 am

    Laura – I know Alex has been on his best behavior. I’ve been noticing, and I appreciate it. Someone’s clearly given him a pep talk about putting the team first and keeping his foot out of his mouth, and he seems to have taken it to heart. However, he’s been back less than a month, and the guy is so incorrigibly prone to saying or doing the wrong thing that I know better than to expect it will be smooth sailing from here on out. The best I dare to hope for is that a winning season and a good group of guys will keep him out of the spotlight.

  84. NO HYPE June 3rd, 2009 at 11:24 am

    This has to be one of the worst posts I have seen in the several years I have followed the blog. Somebody above me mentioned the statistical difference cited in the post being insignicant and 100% related to standard deviations within the game itself.

    Pete but I am sorry and have to side with the crowd on this one.

  85. Dave June 3rd, 2009 at 11:24 am

    I read on a website that A-Rod and Miguel Tejada are responsible for the Natalie Holloway disappearance. Look, I’m not saying it’s definitely true. But let’s have an intelligent discussion about it.

  86. SteveB June 3rd, 2009 at 11:25 am

    Under what rock is Selena Roberts now?

  87. Zooboy June 3rd, 2009 at 11:28 am

    “The book Selena Roberts did on Alex Rodriguez has largely been discredited.”

    Why not stop reading after that statement?

    (What prevented Roberts from doing her own research? Perhaps she was afraid the truth might get in the way of a juicy story.)

  88. Peter Abraham June 3rd, 2009 at 11:31 am

    I don’t ask much here, but please refrain from using curses and crude language in your posts. Thanks.

    Meanwhile, I ran a link to the New York Times story when it came out.

    If you bothered to actually read the post, I didn’t say Alex tipped pitches. I said a legitimate news organization looked into it and found some interesting statistics.

    In terms of sample size, that’s all there is. He was there for three years. There is nothing else to work with. If you think Alex and Tejada are guys with high character who would ever do such a thing, then that is your decision.

    But if at some point you decide to break the law and obtain steroids to enhance your abilities, why would tipping pitches be some sort of great leap?

    The guy took steroids, he lied about it, etc. etc. etc. The list of stupid things Alex has done and admits to doing is lengthy. But there is no chance he would tip pitches?

    How is that the case?

  89. Patrick Bateman June 3rd, 2009 at 11:31 am

    Who cares about the tipping of pitches? Obviously the more damaging info is that he tipped 15% at Hooters.

  90. nick June 3rd, 2009 at 11:33 am

    “But there is no chance he would tip pitches?

    How is that the case?”

    Because there isn’t any evidence.

  91. ellen June 3rd, 2009 at 11:34 am

    Well, a wise man once compared lies, d*mn lies and statistics. I can’t say that the tipping didn’t happen; I’m just not sure that the stats here make it more likely that it did. Wouldn’t surprise me, but I haven’t seen much convincing evidence either way. I have a feeling that folks who think favorably of A-Rod will reject the hypothesis that he was tipping pitches, and those who think unfavorably of him will accept it as yet another reason to dislike him.

  92. DB - (officially panicked 5/13/09) June 3rd, 2009 at 11:36 am

    Didn’t realize how A-bomb from A-Rod wasn’t PC…I can definetely see your point. Never liked the call anyway, I like Bernie goes boom and burn baby burn..he’s been kind of jumping the shark lately with his nicknames.

  93. Ace June 3rd, 2009 at 11:36 am

    I knew we couldn’t go a week without something like this being brought up again. The media actually accuses the fans of being too negative minded!!!

  94. William June 3rd, 2009 at 11:37 am

    Pete, why didn’t you link to the NYT story suggesting that data discredited the tipping allegation? Wasn’t that interesting? The reason many here feel you have a bias against Alex is because your coverage of him seems to be one-sided. Granted, Arod attracts negative coverage, but there are interesting and positive stories that never seem to draw your attention.

  95. Trevor June 3rd, 2009 at 11:38 am

    Umm so Arod is tipping pitches to Teixiera?

    Cool!

  96. Phranchise June 3rd, 2009 at 11:41 am

    Pete, If you bothered to read the posts, I don’t see anyone saying you accused him of anything. People are pointing out huge flaws in the theory and asking you why you bother posting it. You have been Selena cheerleader since day one and seemed a little let down at the “quality” of her book. Yet here you are passing along the same ‘ol he said-she said stuff. The fact that it’s not your own personal stuff doesn’t make it any more relevant or newsworthy. Your readers don’t ask for much either, except maybe a little objectivity. As long as I’ve been reading, I don’t think I’ve ever seen this kind of response. That should tell you something..

  97. nick June 3rd, 2009 at 11:45 am

    I still feel this post is complete garbage. Pete doesn’t like to hear that.

  98. Zooboy June 3rd, 2009 at 11:48 am

    “I said a legitimate news organization looked into it and found some interesting statistics.”

    Those are not statistics. They are numbers. Statistics require anaylsis to determine if they have any true significance to support one theory or another. Sighting numbers to enhance is story is just that, enhancing a story. At this point, it’s not even a good story anymore.

  99. GreenBeret7 June 3rd, 2009 at 11:49 am

    Who was tipping Ramirez, Hernandez, Ortiz, Tejada and Guerero while they were hitting against NYY? It was either Jeter or Cano.

  100. Bronxbeliever June 3rd, 2009 at 11:50 am

    Outlandish claims. Research?? Comical.

  101. PittsburghYankeeFan June 3rd, 2009 at 11:52 am

    Keep promoting the innuedo, Pete. Nice work.

    What does this accomplish?

    Stuff around Alex has generally been quiet since the Selena Roberts nonsense was exposed for what it really was–unsourced heresay.

    Let it rest.

  102. Drew June 3rd, 2009 at 11:53 am

    “In terms of sample size, that’s all there is. He was there for three years. There is nothing else to work with. If you think Alex and Tejada are guys with high character who would ever do such a thing, then that is your decision.”

    In terms of sample size, that’s something the story doesn’t even bother to address. Is the sample size really 36 ABs? Because if it is, that means that A-Rod had something less than two hits than what would be expected in a “low run situation” and maybe one-half of a hit than his expected output during that time.

    If you want to make the argument that character, or the lack of it, alone suggests that Tejeda and A-Rod would tip, then make that argument. But don’t argue that the statistics back the theory when they most certainly do not. Oh, and don’t get upset when most people scoff at the theory. Even when a person is a tool or lacks in character, most people in society require even the slightest degree of proof — you know, facts — before suggesting that the person engaged in egregious behavior. Except the media, of course.

  103. Jon Ringland June 3rd, 2009 at 11:55 am

    Pete,

    A-Rod is an easy target for the press. He has no one to blame for this but himself. You are entitled to your opinions about him (arguably moreso than any of us, as you actually know him). To continually deny that you A) don’t like him and B) are fair in your professional coverage of him insults our intelligence. Is it absurd to think that A-Rod tipped/was tipped in Texas, no, because he has a history of ethically dubious behavior. But you have a history of post after post taking your jabs. And, as you’ve stated in the past, you’re not as harsh as the Post or the Daily News, but you play your game just like they do. And thats fine. He’s set himself up as an easy target, and you take the bait. Just don’t reply that you don’t see how we could misconstrue your comments as “anti-Arod”, because it does insult one’s intelligence.

  104. mmx June 3rd, 2009 at 11:55 am

    Yankees realy have no plan at all at this moment.

    Maybe they can get away with it now, but how about post season? It’s much more intensive competition, who is going to be the setup man?

  105. NO HYPE June 3rd, 2009 at 11:56 am

    Just for reference, you realize that a 100 point jump in BA is equivalent to 1 hit per 10 at bats. So if the Rangers and A’s play each other say 10 times per season, only 1 or 2 of those games are likely to be blowouts. For arguements sake lets say it is 5 of the 10 games per season. Now in the game, usually a five run differential would occur after the 3rd or 4th inning giving say 6 innings of “blowout baseball.” If a batter usually only gets 4 or 5 at bats even in a blowout game, that would give the player 2 or 3 at bats during the pitch tip session. So if there are 5 games, that translates to 10 at bats. If the batting average jumps up only .100 then that means ABOVE NORMAL the players are only getting ONE ADDITIONAL HIT PER SEASON.

    ONE ADDITIONAL HIT PER SEASON.

    100% insignificant.

  106. PittsburghYankeeFan June 3rd, 2009 at 11:56 am

    As long as we’re trying to draw conclusions from events, how about this:

    (1) Manny Ramirez is out for 50 games for HCG use to likely cover up steroid use.
    (2) Manny and Big Papi were teammates for 7 years.
    (3) Papi has gone down the tubes since Manny left and the steroid policy tightened.

    Draw your own conclusions, just like with Alex.

  107. 86w183 June 3rd, 2009 at 11:58 am

    Alex cannot prove that he didn’t tip pitches to opponents. That’s absolutely true.

    It’s also true that he cannot prove that he’s not a pedophile, he cannot prove that he never drank blood from a goat, he cannot prove that he never beat someone to death with a two iron and he cannot prove that he never robbed a bank.

    That is why our justice system is built around the principle that you are innocent until PROVEN guilty because proving you are innocent of something can be difficult if not impossible to do. Most professional journalists respect that principle and are loathe to make public accusations without substantial, documentable evidence to back it up.

    Ms. Roberts and her supporters do not share that ethical burden.

  108. torrey June 3rd, 2009 at 11:59 am

    “Those statistics are interesting and there is research behind them, they literally examined every single game”

    I would like to see the stats on all the better hitters when the game is out of hand, not just a select few

  109. NO HYPE June 3rd, 2009 at 12:01 pm

    “Those statistics are interesting and there is research behind them, they literally examined every single game”

    Literally as in they examing one or every? They either did not examine every single game or they did.

    What research is behind them?

  110. Hola June 3rd, 2009 at 12:02 pm

    Pete can deny this all he wants, but he’s clearly asking us to prove that A-Rod didn’t tip pitches.

    And if we can’t prove that A-Rod didn’t tip pitches, because Shane Spencer heard A-Rod did from someone and told Selena Roberts who then published it in her total failure of a book, according to Pete it’s a possibility A-Rod did tip pitches.

    That’s even though players and managers with no skin in this game either way have said emphatically that it never happened.

    We can’t prove it didn’t happen. So maybe it did.

    Wow. From a supposedly objective newspaper writer – even in a blog setting – that’s pretty questionable ethics.

  111. Bronxbeliever June 3rd, 2009 at 12:03 pm

    Torrey — correct — to suggest ANY ‘research’ was conducted is a joke. Merely an exercise in cherry picking. Dumb.

  112. Tom B June 3rd, 2009 at 12:14 pm

    wow, you mean players get more hits off of bottom-barrel relievers in blowouts? never woulda guessed…

  113. teddy June 3rd, 2009 at 12:15 pm

    could of it happen yes. there no evidence to suggest it. 36 at bats, small sample size

  114. Lisa June 3rd, 2009 at 12:20 pm

    Omar Vizquel actually had better numbers than Tejada, according to this study. The article says, “Vizquel hit .356 against Texas from 2001-03; .319 when the score was within five runs, but .500 when the margin was plus or minus five runs. During that time Rodriguez hit .369 against Cleveland, but .471 when the margin grew to five or more runs.” Here’s what he said about it:

    “I don’t think I’ve ever said anything more than ‘Hello,’ to Alex,” Vizquel said when asked about the statistical anomaly (h. “Nobody has ever asked me to do something like that and I’ve never asked anybody. I heard about a lot of things in my career, like corking the bat and steroids, but those were guys cheating to win. This would be guys cheating the game. That’s bad. It doesn’t matter how close a friend you have on the other team; he’s not my friend during the game.”

    Vizquel laughed when the numbers were presented to him.

    “Imagine how well I would have done if I had known what pitch was coming,” Vizquel said.

  115. brent June 3rd, 2009 at 12:25 pm

    Awh PETE, man,Yankees are doing good now,and this is the thing
    you *choose to quote,speculate,and lend credence to yellow* *journalism*

    If you ever need another career try prosecutor,they love circumstantial evidence cases,better than direct evidence,because it more winnable by jury. They let the jury
    connect the dots,any lawyer will tell you juries are suckers
    for circumstantial info.

  116. Lisa June 3rd, 2009 at 12:28 pm

    Pete, you write: “Would players who cheat by using PEDs also be willing to cheat by telling each other what was coming? That’s a question we will probably never get an answer to.”

    Why don’t you give it the old college try and ask A-Rod yourself about these allegations? You can also interview Omar Vizquel tonight too.

  117. edgar June 3rd, 2009 at 12:31 pm

    so what’s the league average when games are “out of hand”?

  118. NO HYPE June 3rd, 2009 at 12:31 pm

    http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/.....=220929113

    There were only 3 “blowout” games between the two teams for all of 2002. Thats not even an additional hit due to tipping, it is 1/3 a hit.

  119. John June 3rd, 2009 at 12:32 pm

    I’m no great fan or advocate of ARod, but there are many many other factors involved when compiling and interpreting those numbers most notably the quality of pitchers faced. not to mention that maybe hitters relax and are more comfortbale and therefore better performers when the game is out of hand. in any event, the statistics posted above (not withstanding the Guillen example which is a joke) prove nothing and to suggest otherwise, even implicitly, is kind of irresponsible. A few weeks ago, RAB posted a much more detailed and exhaustive look at ARod and his opponents in high vs low leverage situations and came to the opposite conclusion.

  120. Global Warming June 3rd, 2009 at 12:33 pm

    Whats clear here is Petes obsessed hatred for one Alex Rodriguez. He loves bringing up his PED use but never did I hear it mentioned when Giambi was on the team. No, according to Pete, Giambi was the greatest person in the world and thus was never referred to as a cheater. I’m not sure what A-Rod did to Pete but it’s like a woman scorned. Act like a professional and get over it.

  121. Joe June 3rd, 2009 at 12:39 pm

    Come on Pete, you’re better than this. Selena is an ambulance chasing low rent journalistic prostitute..and that’s my rated PG version.

  122. KW June 3rd, 2009 at 12:43 pm

    Some more info on this, with substantially better information than using L/I

    http://www.3-dbaseball.net/200.....5516364013

  123. Rob D. June 3rd, 2009 at 12:45 pm

    The numbers posted are so far beyond meaningless that I simply cannot believe that someone who is paid to write about baseball would find them even remotely interesting.

  124. Observer283 June 3rd, 2009 at 12:55 pm

    Pete, I apologize. I missed the fact that you linked to the NY Times story. But I think you are still missing the point.

    Anyone who is saying conculisevly that A-Rod never tipped pitches to the opponent is wrong. It is just impossible to say that with certainty. So I am not disagreeing with your assertion that its possible.

    I am only saying there has been absolutely nothing close to credible evidence that he has done it. The numbers from this article are woefully insufficient evidence of any wrong doing on A-Rod’s part. I mean not even close to being relevant.

    Try this mind experiment. Keep all the numbers for all the players referenced in this article the same and switch the name Derek Jeter for A-Rod. Would these numbers be evidence in your mind that Jeter tipped pitches? I highly doubt it.

    You keep referring to A-Rod’s lack of character and credibilty. I agree that A-Rod has no kick coming there. Plus, you are closer to A-Rod on a daily basis than I am, so I trust you are a better judge of his character than I could be.

    But his character and credibility flaws are the ONLY substantive evidence that he may have tipped pitches. That’s it. These numbers do not count as evidence. They just don’t. Again, if you saw these numbers connected to a player you trust and respect, you would not likely view them as evidence that this trustworthy player tipped pitches. You would likely view them as what they are: a collection of random variations from teeny sample sizes.

    I can’t argue with the statement that “Alex’ character leads me to believe he is capable of tipping pitches.” That is a fair and credible read of the situation. Using this study as evidence that he may have tipped pitches: INCREDIBLY WEAK.

  125. Mr. Faded Glory June 3rd, 2009 at 12:57 pm

    Oy vey. This is what happens when people who don’t understand numbers and statistics (like Evan Grant, seemingly) pull in random numbers in an effort to try to “prove” something.

    The numbers he pulled are meaningless. Of COURSE hitters will have better numbers in blowouts, usually regardless of which side they’re on. They face worse pitching and usually get strikes.

    Also it fails to take into account that perhaps Rodriguez/Tejada etc are part of the REASON the teams are blowing out the opposition – A-Rod goes 3-for-3 with 2 HR and a double early in a game that turns into a rout, and these numbers are now held against him?

    I’m no huge A-Rod protector but these numbers are worse than meaningless because they try to tell a story that doesn’t exist.

    Pete I’m surprised you gave this story any credibility at all.

  126. Mr. Faded Glory June 3rd, 2009 at 1:00 pm

    Also I pulled actual stat totals, not just picked and chosen anecdotal stats, on A-Rod’s time in Texas here: http://highandtight.blogspot.c.....stuff.html

    He had very limited at bats in blowouts, and his numbers actually DECLINE.

  127. Jim June 3rd, 2009 at 1:03 pm

    Pete, I can’t believe you are bringing this up again. It seems as though you are committed to championing Roberts’ rumours. Good journalists do not need to resort to this type of reporting. Stringing together a handful of cirumstantial bits of data does not prove guilt. This is no more constructive than the rumours suggesting the David Ortiz’s struggles are due to roid withdrawal. It might make a good story, but it serves no purpose without proof. PLEASE move on. You are better than this!

  128. Ryan (Im just waiting till the shine wears off) June 3rd, 2009 at 1:04 pm

    This is it. This is the story that forces me to completely lose it. This is not journalism this is talk radio. This is the business of generating blog hits by posting absolute garbage in order to fire up the fans. To say this is interesting is so simple minded it actually hurts my head.

    I have seen multiple sources posting information about how the aggregate stats of all teams that played the rangers during blow outs actually batted worse leading those sites to the punchline of “If Alex is tipping pitches hes doing a very poor job”. Because one source manipulates the stats to fit his argument is definitely not interesting at all. It is bush league and the person should be ashamed to only release the players that actually contribute to his argument rather than the entire sample.

  129. brent June 3rd, 2009 at 1:31 pm

    *PETE* Start a new thread on,

    *Why Manny was taking female* *hormones to stimulate* *ovaries,he doesn’t have*.

    *or*

    *Why Ortiz is nothing without Roid boy Manny in the line up*

    *or*

    *Who are the other secret names on the list still playing*?

    Scorn all the roiders,don’t cherry pick,or use discredited
    journalist that are on a mission of hate toward a player.

    *PLEASE,you are better joutnalist than this thread* !!

  130. george June 3rd, 2009 at 1:33 pm

    the multiple levels of bad logic and incomplete research in this post give a new meaning to the phrase “journalistic irresponsibility,” even by the extremely low standards i’ve come to expect from the BBWAA members.

    very simple for anyone to research – go to baseball reference.com, look at A-Rod’s splits for 2001-2003 in leverage situations, and see how he did when the game was out of hand vs. when it was close.

  131. brent June 3rd, 2009 at 1:40 pm

    I know why *Pete* is bringing it up now,because the Yankees
    are in first place and *RS* aren’t,plain and simple!!!

  132. rbj June 3rd, 2009 at 1:50 pm

    Let’s see:
    1) If your team is a head by a lot, it means you are killing the ball. Thus it stands to reason good hitters will hit better in that situation

    2) If your team is down by a lot, the other team is going to throw a lot of fastballs. Good hitters will take advantage of that situation.

    A-Rod is only one datum point (singular of data). Need much more data before drawing any conclusions.

    I believe Orel Hershiser had it best: A-Rod was lousy at letting only his team know what the next pitch was while at short.

    PS Peter, when are you going to attach the same “cheater” label to Andy “HGH” Pettitte?

  133. Kevin June 3rd, 2009 at 1:56 pm

    Pete brings this up because it

    a) drives traffic to his company’s site

    b) has personal feelings against A-Rod and likes to discredit him any chance he can get

    c) has nothing better to do today

    d) all of the above

    e) actually believes this stuff

    I say “d”. He’s been around baseball too long to fall for the bogus, full of holes statistical argument.

  134. Kevin June 3rd, 2009 at 2:04 pm

    John Ringland wrote:

    >>>

    A-Rod is an easy target for the press. He has no one to blame for this but himself. You are entitled to your opinions about him (arguably moreso than any of us, as you actually know him). To continually deny that you A) don’t like him and B) are fair in your professional coverage of him insults our intelligence. Is it absurd to think that A-Rod tipped/was tipped in Texas, no, because he has a history of ethically dubious behavior. But you have a history of post after post taking your jabs. And, as you’ve stated in the past, you’re not as harsh as the Post or the Daily News, but you play your game just like they do. And thats fine. He’s set himself up as an easy target, and you take the bait. Just don’t reply that you don’t see how we could misconstrue your comments as “anti-Arod”, because it does insult one’s intelligence.

    <<<

    So well said it was worth repeating. Statistically speaking, Peter never misses an opportunity to take a shot at A-Rod. And if he does, he’ll be sure to point out that he didn’t take the opportunity.

    He can stand the heat though. It comes with the job.

  135. bryan June 3rd, 2009 at 2:34 pm

    Bunch of homers in these comments.

  136. islesfan June 3rd, 2009 at 2:57 pm

    There are some unsolved crimes that have taken place in the vicinity of Yankee Stadium. Based on ARod’s questionable character and the fact that he’s already admitted to other illegal activities, it’s only natural to assume that he’s guilty of those crimes as well.

    I dare you to prove otherwise.

  137. Harley June 3rd, 2009 at 3:06 pm

    This has been mentioned multiple times, but you — and Grant, of course — probably need to wear it on a tee shirt for a couple days. When the game is out of hand, that’s when the worst pitchers on the team go to the mound, both for the winners and the losers. It’s that simple. Add to the that the mantra that is ground into every pitcher when the score is lopsided — throw strikes! — and it would be weird if batting averages were anything other than higher.

    But thus far, rather than address the latter, all you bring to the discussion is limp justification for your own bias.

    Bias makes us stupid. This is nothing more or less than an example of that.

  138. howard June 3rd, 2009 at 3:13 pm

    Hard to tell – you’re getting fastballs when the game is out of hand anyway.

  139. Michael June 3rd, 2009 at 3:15 pm

    Peter,

    Could you link the entry where you discuss the Times article? I’m having trouble locating it…

    Thanks!

  140. Bill from NJ June 3rd, 2009 at 3:22 pm

    Hmmm… I guess Peter is once again dieing for website clicks now that the Yankees are on a roll and there’s no dirty controversial A-Rod laundry that he can talk about. Instead of allowing this story to die, he once again has to resurrect a reticules story and make himself look like a high school reporter once again. (First time Pete actually made me angry!)

    First off you look like a total fool posting these stats and claiming that they actually mean something. First off, in your last thread about this, I went through exactly how many AB’s A-Rod had in such situations. Likewise, I elaborated on how many times in these situations he would encounter the same opposing players. Given such a small sample size it irresponsible reporting to even post a story like this.

    “Seattle’s Carlos Guillen, a teammate of Rodriguez’s for three seasons with the Mariners, went from .307 to .318. in “out of hand” situations. Rodriguez, however, jumped from .264 to .391 against the Mariners in those situations.”

    Did you ever realize that .264 is quite below Rodriguez’s career average and the jump may just have to do w/ the law of averages? Likewise, do you realize that the pitching is drastically different in blowout games? Dominant starts are retired for lesser caliber middle relievers. Moreover, its quite obvious that a pitcher in a blowout pitches much differently than they do in a high scoring game. They don’t pitch with the same intensity and they pitch for outs.

    Peter, your turning into a tabloid reporter and your losing your credibility with these once a week idiotic posts that you make to get your blog going again. I can’t wait for you to start stalking A-Rod from a tree trying to get naked pictures of him. THAT would really get your blog going!!

    The sad part is I’ve enjoyed your writing for years, but you’ve since turned into a disgrace when covering A-Rod. You may have lost a reader, and I am quite sure there are others much like me. I’ll subscribe to enquirer if I wanted to read this junk!

  141. howard June 3rd, 2009 at 3:26 pm

    Also, I don’t think this can be established without a person specifically coming forward and saying “He told me, here was our plan, look at this game and this game and this game and watch what we did.” This is what a good journalist would do – Roberts, of course, didn’t bother to do so to lend her story credibility – and could actually be proven by looking at eye contact and signals and signs made by players over the course of 3 year. All that stuff should be on tape. (Roberts of course didn’t bother to investigate any history or popularity of this, as negative gossip about A-Rod was all she wanted.)

    Just a guess, but I don’t see Alex starting this conspiracy where he talks to a few complicit pitch-tippers to find games where it’s blowouts and get good calls to increase his homerun total by, what, 4 a season? I just don’t picture a mansion on a hill on a stormy night, with lightning striking and the wind making frightening sounds. Alex Rodriguez gathers a collection of starting MLB shortstops and second basemen into his basement and says, “Gentlemen, I’ve devised a scheme that will ensure all of us hit slightly better once the game is out of hand,” and proceed to get several players in on the corrupt bargain.

  142. Bill from NJ June 3rd, 2009 at 3:30 pm

    Ohh I forgot this brainstorm! What about the idea that if your up by 5 or more runs, it usually means your team is hitting well and the other team isn’t pitching well. What happens if your playing the Texas Rangers? A team who has all season allowed their pitchers to “pitch through” rough outtings. If you get tatooed for 5 runs in the first 3 innings, odds are your not going to do much better if you don’t get taken out. That pitcher just doesn’t have his stuff that day. Considering A-Rod is arguably the best hitter in baseball, I would have guessed his average was close to .500 in such situations.

  143. KO June 3rd, 2009 at 3:47 pm

    Extremely good point by like the 1st or 2nd commenter. Of course when the game is “out of hand” the pitchers are almost always going to be one of the worst on the staff. Down by a lot or up by a lot, late in a game, chances are there’s a mop up guy on the mound. A couple more runs and few more hits are probably pretty likely. Give me a break. If it’s true it’s screwed up because a baseball game is truly never over until it’s over. A team could be down by 6 in the bottom of the ninth, two out and no one on and still have a chance to tie up the game and eventually win it. It happens. Either way, even if Alex did take part in this I’m sure has already decided he wouldn’t do it with the Yankees, he is not that stupid especially with everything that’s happened to him lately regarding the steroids and such. He doesn’t have the stones to do shady stuff like that now, still. Give him more credit than that.

  144. Harley June 3rd, 2009 at 4:07 pm

    First a brief apology. I assumed that Peter had not bothered to address the biggest hole in this story — the kind of pitcher that is most likely on the mound during a blowout game. On the other hand, it’s hard not to point out how weak his actual defense was:

    “Actually, if you were a “garbage” pitcher being used in such circumstances, wouldn’t you try and pitch well to improve your status within the game? I would doubt you would just groove BP fastballs to good hitters.”

    Garbage pitchers, your term, don’t have to ability to improve or impress at will. Garsh. That’s why they’re garbage pitchers. I don’t get it. A-Rod has many talents, but one of them is getting annoying. The ability to make sportswriters stupid. Now in fairness, a large number of them are — remember all the breathless and brainless chatter about the home run numbers at Arlington? AT ARLINGTON???? — but Pete is anything but stupid, and I’m not sure why he would, if nothing else, give further airing to a conspiracy as poorly founded as this one.

  145. Maureen June 4th, 2009 at 10:20 am

    A-Rod is blamed for everything from the fall of the Roman Empire to global warming..Slamming A-Rod has gotten old really quick..Hardly a days goes by here on this blog that this player is not talked about..

    Referencing the tabloid book that sank faster than the Titanic has been refuted by many as a hatchet job filled with innuendo,speculation,and sources say–not a credible work of journalism.

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