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Why didn’t the Yankees stick with the plan?

Posted by: Peter Abraham - Posted in Misc on Jun 20, 2009 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

When Alex Rodriguez returned from his hip surgery, the Yankees spoke glowingly about the work his surgeon and rehab specialist were doing. To listen to them talk, Dr. Marc Philippon and Dr. Mark Lindsay are the two best at what they do.

Based on all available information, that seems to be exactly the case. They are the best.

According to Rodriguez, the plan put in place by Philippon and Lindsay was for him to take 5-8 games off during his first 45 games back with the team. Not 45 days, 45 games.

But over the first 38 games he was back, A-Rod sat out zero games. He started every one of them, 35 of them at third base. Day games after night games, rain-delayed games, every single game.

A-Rod said he fought to stay in games, which is what he supposed to do. Knowing him, I’m sure that’s exactly what he did. But why didn’t the Yankees stick with the plan their doctors drew up? All of a sudden a third baseman with a high school education knew better than the two best doctors in their respective fields? Of course Alex said he wanted to play. What else would he say?

Joe Girardi admitted yesterday that he should have given Alex more days off than he did. It appears that Brian Cashman finally forced the issue yesterday. But he should have made that call a week ago. A-Rod has been struggling for three weeks now. His June slugging percentage is .291. Teams have been intentionally walking other players to get to him.

Now they’re going to sit the guy down for two days and hope that rejuvenates him. It’s the Philippon/Lindsay plan in a condensed version.

Tom Verducci had a great stat yesterday: Alex is hitting .246 since he turned 33 last July 27. If you look at those numbers more closely, he has an .880 OPS. That’s pretty good compared to most players. But he was at .969 before that. He also has stolen only five bases in his last 96 games.

Whether it’s his hip, his age, his use of PEDs for three years, his personal issues or whatever, Alex is in a steep decline and the Yankees have to figure out a way to stabilize that and get something out of him. Otherwise that $258 million they owe him through 2017 is going to go down as the worst contract in sports history.

Maybe it already is.

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138 Responses to “Why didn’t the Yankees stick with the plan?”

  1. Carl June 20th, 2009 at 12:18 pm

    Only time will tell

  2. JJ June 20th, 2009 at 12:18 pm

    “Whether it’s his hip, his age, his personal issues or whatever, Alex is in a steep decline and the Yankees have to figure out a way to stabilize that and get something out of him. Otherwise that $258 million they owe him through 2017 is going to go down as the worst contract in sports history.

    Maybe it already is.”

    Bingo. It already is. The rest of this stuff is just window dressing.

  3. Banks June 20th, 2009 at 12:19 pm

    They couldn’t get anything out of Giambi, why should they get anything out of Alex?

    Once a roider’s body starts to break down in his mid 30s, all the medical treatment in the world can’t save him. He is what he is at this point and it is only going to get worse.

  4. Scorpio June 20th, 2009 at 12:20 pm

    Because the answer to no A-Rod is Angel Berroa. Isn’t that fairly obvious? When you have your #3 guy hitting lights out with A-Rod behind him, it’s difficult to do the right thing and give him a off day. Hopefully this rest will help Alex.

  5. Samples June 20th, 2009 at 12:20 pm

    It’s the hip. As I mentioned in a previous post, he was flexing it last season all the time during his at bats. I was surprised then and now that no one picked up on that and asked him what was up. Maybe they did and he kept quiet, who knows, but I thinks it’s on the medical staff to drill down on stuff like that. Happens too much with the Yankees.

  6. tim boat June 20th, 2009 at 12:20 pm

    The Yankees can’t manage injuries and rehabbing players. What else is new?

    We already know that can’t develop their own prospects (rushing Phil Hughes in 2006, anointing Kennedy and Hughes as the second comings last year etc)

  7. RC 16 June 20th, 2009 at 12:20 pm

    Considering how much A-Rod has already declined and considering it will get worse as he ages because of the steroids… I’m starting to wonder if he even will threaten the HR record and reach those milestones.

  8. Boston Dave - OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 12:21 pm

    “Dave will you please handle my investments? If $ 51 Million can be turned into $ 81 Million in just six years in this day and age that’s amazing!”
    ————-

    well 86w183, I certainly don’t remember everything from business school but If you are going to make a major investment (such as Daisuke’s contract) I think it’s safe to say you’d expect a minimum of 10% return per year (which is less than the S&P 500’s avg annual return over the past 50 years).

    So for the $50M posting fee and a minimal 10% annual gain:

    year 1 interest/ROI: $5M
    year 2 interest: 5.5M
    year 3 interest: 6M
    year 4 interest: 6.6M
    year 5 interest: 7.2M
    year 6 interest: 8M

    that’s about $38M over 6 years, so $88M.

    I realize you think you’re being a smartass but the #s back up my claim.

    If anything, I am understating the #s because, as I said, if you cannot beat the S&P 500, you prob shouldn’t take on greater risk than an index fund.

    The Red Sox look at all of their signings in this manner (what their return on investment will be) so I don’t think it’s far fetched to take my approach.

  9. Lauren June 20th, 2009 at 12:24 pm

    I blame Madonna for all this.

  10. Soldier June 20th, 2009 at 12:24 pm

    Dice-K brings them millions of dollars in revenue and they are implementing the Red Sox brand all over Japan

    Saito even said that the Sox have overtaken the Yankees in Japan because of all the success Dice-K and Okijima have had. So they are obviously getting a huge return on their investment. Like the Yankees, the PR effects are just as important as the performance effects.

  11. NongEyeJon June 20th, 2009 at 12:25 pm

    He was an MVP 2 years ago and had an injury last year…decline already? Lets give him some more time.

  12. Boston Dave - OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 12:26 pm

    “Dice-K brings them millions of dollars in revenue and they are implementing the Red Sox brand all over Japan”

    ———–

    actually he brings millions of dollars in revenue to the entire league, IIRC.

    that whole revenue sharing thing. The Sox don’t get the money for a Daisuke jersey. The league splits it up evenly.

    They do make some money from their “investments” in Japan but the Daisuke contract is fair game for criticism as much as any of the Yankee contracts have been (perhaps minus Igawa).

  13. Betsy June 20th, 2009 at 12:28 pm

    A steep decline? I don’t care what Tom Verdopey said (what a creep). Does he think that Alex maybe was suffering from his hip injury last year and THAT would contribute to his diminished #s? That’s all I have to say about that.

    AS to the Yankees, they suck when it comes to handling injuries. Joe realized that he made a mistake in not resting Alex enough…wow, it’s about time. Clueless…I’m sorry, but it’s the truth.

  14. Boston Dave - OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 12:28 pm

    I do agree with you Soldier though.

    My original point was that Daisuke’s contract is absolutely, positively, unequivocally NOT for 6yrs/$100M (apx 50M salary plus $50M posting fee).

    A lump sump payment or signing bonus is much more than over the course of the contract.

    Ever see the lottery? You can take $60M up front or $250M over the course of 30 years.

    Some people just don’t understand that, I guess.

  15. Rose June 20th, 2009 at 12:30 pm

    It was especially important to listen to the Doctors because Alex came back from surgery early. I think they kept Alex in there because Tex came alive with Alex behind him in the line-up. Girardi is responsible. Since when do you listen to Arod rather than his Doctors?
    Besides not hitting well you could see Alex could not or would not run hard. Maybe he thought he would aggravate it.

    They could have played Pena or Berroa at 3rd base.

  16. TOS June 20th, 2009 at 12:34 pm

    It’s not the worst contract ever (yet), but it certainly has potential. Time will tell obviously, but right now it’s not looking good. . .

    The part I never understood is who exactly were the Yankees bidding against? Nevermind the fact that by Arod opting out, the Yankees lost the money that the Rangers were paying to subsidize Arod’s previous contract. This whole contract was really bad business on the Yankees part, but then again the Yankees are so clueless they thought they would be selling out $2,500 seats every night.

    If only the Yankees had stood by what Cashman kept saying in 2007, that if he opted out they were not going to go after him. Hal & Hank and the rest of the brain(less)trust blinked and here we are. The Yankees are getting what they deserve, the rest of us just get to pay the price by having to watch this unfold. Eight more years. . .

  17. SJ44 June 20th, 2009 at 12:35 pm

    Arod topics always bring out the trolls. Now, we have medical expert trolls. Pretty funny.

    The question Pete posed is a very legitimate question.

    My guess? They were scuffling before he got back, played much better when he got back, and were heading into a tough part of their schedule. They probably pushed it because of those reasons.

    Its not like there isn’t any pressure to win this year. Look at how the crybabies react after every loss.

    Can you imagine if they said prior to a Red Sox or Rays game, “this is Alex’s scheduled day off. He isn’t playing”.

    Fans and media would lose their collective minds if the Yankees did that.

    Folks are losing their minds over him not playing against the Marlins. Multiply that by a 1,000 if they sat him out earlier and we would have more conspiracy theories at work than we already have over this stuff.

    I wouldn’t be so quick to write the guy’s professional obituary just yet.

    Something tells me he has better times ahead.

    Chase Utley and Mike Lowell seem to have bounced back nicely from hip surgery. I believe Arod will do the same.

  18. Tom B June 20th, 2009 at 12:37 pm

    so his ops is 880 since his hip started bothering? what’s that supposed to prove… you can’t play baseball with a busted hip?

  19. Richie June 20th, 2009 at 12:40 pm

    I think it has been his hip, but that only underscores how incompetently the Yankees have handled this situation.

  20. Boston Dave June 20th, 2009 at 12:41 pm

    I think SJ44 nailed it on the head.

    Remember that ridiculous winning streak that coincided with Alex’s return?

  21. Rose June 20th, 2009 at 12:42 pm

    Banks

    Does that mean that the other players, (Delgado) etc., with the same injury as Alex were all on steroids?

    —————————————————————

    HGH is not detectable so no one knows who is using it.

  22. SJ44 June 20th, 2009 at 12:44 pm

    I don’t think there is anything wrong with his hip. If there was, the Yankees wouldn’t risk playing him.

    I think you are dealing with a situation where a guy had major surgery, came back early, and is just worn down a bit. By being worn down, he got into bad habits at the plate.

    We forget that Arod is a very detailed guy in the way he goes about his work. Every day in ST has a purpose. His pre-game rituals are legendary.

    He had no real spring training. He is, in essence about 7 weeks behind everybody else in preparation time. You can’t make that up in 4-6 weeks.

    All of his pre-game work has to change because of the hip. He can’t push it like he used to and that takes some adjustment on his part.

    This is all new territory for him and the Yankees. Just means they have to sometimes take a step back and make adjustments.

  23. Tom in N.J June 20th, 2009 at 12:47 pm

    “Chase Utley and Mike Lowell seem to have bounced back nicely from hip surgery. I believe Arod will do the same.”

    Yes, and both had their hips fixed in the offseason. They were able to have 3-4 months off plus spring training. Alex had no such timetable. He had his surgery in early March and he was back playing for the Yankees on May 15th.

  24. Peter Abraham June 20th, 2009 at 12:47 pm

    The issue with the hip is two-fold:

    He may need a second surgery. It’s 50-50 from what they say.

    Was the hip labrum torn because of steroid use? All of a sudden, players have torn hip labrums, an injury that didn’t exist in baseball until 2008. Is that coincidence or a result of something?

    Nobody knows. This is all new to baseball and the trainers, doctors, etc.

    Meanwhile, if his hips went, what goes next? Would that be because of steroids use? Who knows? It’s a big mess.

    Nobody knows with any of this stuff. That’s why you need to be very, very careful with large contracts and the Yankees weren’t.

  25. Rose June 20th, 2009 at 12:49 pm

    Yankees should have listened to Alex’s doctors. If the media and fans didn’t like it, tough.

  26. Carl June 20th, 2009 at 12:51 pm

    We’re not even halfway though his contract yet. He might catch fire and never look back. He might become the worst player in the league. Its to early to tell.

  27. Aura June 20th, 2009 at 12:53 pm

    how many former roid abusers or accused roid abusers are still playing at a high level? Tejada is the only one who is still putting up decent numbers – but his power has all but vanished. Face it, Arod has probably been on performance enhancing drugs his entire career, without them he would have been a light hitting good fielding shortstop.

  28. Betsy June 20th, 2009 at 12:53 pm

    Great points, SJ. Alex will be fine……maybe not this year, but he will be. Steep decline? I stopped reading Verdopey after he ripped Cash to no end after the Torre era came to an end. That’s how he wants to get hits on the CNNSI website – trash Alex and get everyone all up in arms. Tom is the one in steep decline.

  29. tampayank June 20th, 2009 at 12:53 pm

    The yankee organization hasn’t had the best track record w player rehabs. Wang, Hughes, Bruney, Marte,etc the list goes. The biggest brand name in American Sports shouln’t have these blunders.

  30. 55 June 20th, 2009 at 12:56 pm

    “an injury that didn’t exist in baseball until 2008″

    Are you kidding me? Multiple doctors have said that they’ve just gotten better at diagnosing them.

    How’s this:

    “To many, the use of performance-enhancing drugs is the answer but Dr. Alexis Chiang Colvin, an Assistant Professor of Sports Medicine from Mount Sinai’s Department of Orthopaedics in New York, is not sure of this allegation. “The hip labrum isn’t a big muscle injury. In fact it’s more of a repetitive injury so I wouldn’t say it was consistent with use (of steroids),” Colvin said in a phone interview.

    Colvin specializes in surgical treatment of knee, shoulder and hip disorder and has also worked with the Super Bowl Champion Pittsburgh Steelers, NHL’s Pittsburgh and the University of Pittsburgh. “I’m not sure it’s a new injury,” Colvin said. “I just think we do a better job of diagnosing. I’m sure a lot of players had similar problems but it wasn’t necessarily diagnosed the same way and the treatment may have differed.””

    http://tinyurl.com/mv3eh3

    Do some freaking research. Oh wait, that won’t drum up interest. My b.

  31. Bill June 20th, 2009 at 12:56 pm

    I think the NYY failed to stick to the plan because Alex was very good when he first came back. It’s hard to sit a guy who is playing so well and who is providing the team a much needed boost. But The NYY needed to look at the long haul and stick to the plan. I think he’ll regroup and get rolling soon.

  32. SJ44 June 20th, 2009 at 12:57 pm

    No doubt Pete. However, it may not just be from steroid usage that we are seeing these kind of injuries.

    I think year round training also has a lot to do with it.

    There is no “off-season” for guys anymore. They are constantly working out. Its like that in all sports.

    You see a ton of injuries in football that, if they were happening in baseball, folks would talk about PED usage.

    I think we can both agree, how PED use is covered in baseball is COMPLETELY different than how its covered in football. There is virtually no scrutiny in football by the media re: PED usage. Certainly no scarlet letters given out.

    When Rodney Harrison announced his retirement a few weeks ago, ESPN asked, “Is he a Hall of Famer”? NOBODY on the panel brought up his suspension for HGH. You NEVER have that happen to a baseball player.

    In football, you have OTA’s, mini camps, QB camps, etc. “Voluntary” of course but, attendance is always over 90%, making it a year round sport.

    When do athletes give their bodies time to rest? It seems, never these days.

    I think its natural, but perhaps permature, to label all of these injuries the byproduct of PED usage. We need to see extensive research data in order to make that call.

    Utley and Lowell have never been discussed as PED users and they had the same injury Alex had and and off-season to recover from it.

    I understand folks making the leap in trying to tie these injuries to PED usage. I’m just saying we need to see data to support the theory.

  33. BBFan June 20th, 2009 at 12:57 pm

    “Maybe it already is.”

    Only mediots (credit to GB for coining the phrase :) ), come to such stupid conclusions even after knowing the facts that Alex was playing with an injured hip second half of last season and this year he has been palying after returning from major surgery.

    Only Pete can declare whether he belongs to the group called mediots. Certainly the conclusions he draws here about A-Rod and Girardi give credence to such possiblity.

    If people have not noticed it, inspite of all the challeges, Girardi kept the team in good shape. You want proof ? Today they have the third best record in all of baseball and second best record in AL. You may not agree with all his moves which is normal with every manager, but one has to be stupid to criticise Girardi for overall performance of the team to date.

  34. Aura June 20th, 2009 at 12:57 pm

    Yankees should have listened to Alex’s doctors. If the media and fans didn’t like it, tough.

    ___________

    Girardi’s job was on the line, like Torre before him he thought of his career first and a player’s health second.

  35. 55 June 20th, 2009 at 12:58 pm

    Here’s another one:

    “Mike Lowell, Chase Utley, Alex Rodriguez, Alex Gordon and Carlos Delgado have all been diagnosed with torn labrums in the past eight months. One team strength coach posited that this injury has suddenly become prevalent because of better diagnoses, and that torn labrums in the past may have been dismissed as groin strains because of similar symptoms.”

    http://mlb.fanhouse.com/2009/0.....hip-issue/

    But no, “Alex did steroids- is he finished? I’m not saying, I’m just saying” makes for a much better story.

  36. Patrick June 20th, 2009 at 1:02 pm

    To already make the judgement that A-rod’s long contract is a bust is silly. It is also silly to think that A-rod is already in decline. I’d think his hip surgery has something to do with it.

    It’s pretty hilarious that every sportswriter thinks that everything ties back to steroids. Really, you guys are way too dramatic and panicky for my tastes.

  37. 55 June 20th, 2009 at 1:05 pm

    Patrick- they don’t actually believe it. With one google search I found two sources saying the injury isn’t related to steroids without leaving the first page of results. It just makes for a better story to remind everyone that Alex did steroids.

  38. Richie June 20th, 2009 at 1:06 pm

    SJ44

    The question Pete posed is a very legitimate question.

    My guess? They were scuffling before he got back, played much better when he got back, and were heading into a tough part of their schedule. They probably pushed it because of those reasons.
    __

    Who cares why they pushed? Are you seriously arguing that they couldn’t have found a game or two since May 8th to rest him? They could have rested him a game against Baltimore from May 19th to 21st, or against Texas from May 25th to 27th, or against Cleveland from May 29th to June 1st, or against Texas from June 2nd to June 4th.

    That the Yankees didn’t do that was extremely short-sighted, as well as being ridiculously incompetent.

  39. G. Love June 20th, 2009 at 1:07 pm

    Definitely think it’s way too early to write Arod off. It makes a good topic though.

    I do agree with Pete about the interesting coincidence of hip injuries in guys like Lowell, Utley, Arod, Delgado and Alex Gordon in KC.

    I knew it seems too simple minded to think they are related to PED use, but in most cases aren’t the needles shoved into that area?

    In any event, Arod needs time off. I think all the hype that this injury and the way he was coming back was going to free him and allow him to play like a hall of famer was hype.

    The guy had hip surgery. By all accounts he may need another one. If you don’t think everytime he twists and turns he’s not thinking about his hip you’re crazy.

    I got a sports hernia from weight lifting a few years ago and to this day every single time I feel a twinge in my abs I think I’m ready to go to the emergency room for another surgery.

    Arod, in my opinion, has a long way to go to working himself out of this funk. He needs to realize and believe in what he physically can and cannot do.

    He’ll get there, but it’s obviously way too soon at this point for him to show that kind of rebound.

  40. randy l. June 20th, 2009 at 1:09 pm

    boston dave-

    i agree with you that the fifty million lump sum is more like 85 million.

    i wonder what other accounting rules affect that kind of lump payment. do the red sox expense it and write it off over one year or do they do it over a series of years?

    how do they depreciate their asset ? i have no idea how that’s done in baseball, but i think there may be even more things than just simple interest which as you point out is a lot.

    sj44 probably knows more about the accounting rules , but i suspect because you never see a team paying out a huge lump( 50 million) sum up front, there must be disadvantages to the teams for doing it.
    i do know players are depreciated but i have no idea how that works.

    anyway, bottom line it looks like the red sox paid a fortune for matsuzaka.

  41. SJ44 June 20th, 2009 at 1:10 pm

    GLove,

    No, needles are not put into the hip area when guys are injecting PED’s.

    Its more the butt than the hip.

    Nowadays, much of the newer, designer stuff is in pill form.

    “Back in the day” though, needles were never injected into the hip area. It was strictly an, “in the butt” injection.

  42. Tom in N.J June 20th, 2009 at 1:12 pm

    Torn hip labrums are to baseball what Micro-fracture knee unjuries are to baseketball. The injury always existed but the means for diagnosis was’t available.

    “People and doctors are just more aware of it diagnostically. We’ve always had hip problems; now we are just finding it better.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06.....=1&em

  43. Shame Spencer June 20th, 2009 at 1:17 pm

    Am I the only one that thinks this is a little extreme?:

    “Whether it’s his hip, his age, his personal issues or whatever, Alex is in a steep decline and the Yankees have to figure out a way to stabilize that and get something out of him. Otherwise that $258 million they owe him through 2017 is going to go down as the worst contract in sports history.

    Maybe it already is.”

    Arod had notoriously had terrible stretches at this time of year, he is behind in his routine because he had MAJOR SURGERY, and the Yankees have once again handled an injured player with little care. And this somehow translates into a waste of money and major decline for the rest of his career?? I love Pete, but for all the snide comments we get about the fans having a ‘win now mentality’ this sounds awfully similar…

  44. Peter Abraham June 20th, 2009 at 1:18 pm

    You can’t discount PEDs in any of this. Maybe they don’t directly cause hip injuries. But how are guys physically able to lift those weights or do those workouts all year long? Red Bull? There is no off-season testing in baseball. You can do whatever you want from October-January and they have no way of knowing if you take the right substances.

    You are hopelessly naive if you don’t think a large percentage of players were doing something. Now that baseball is testing and public scrutiny is what it is and legends like Clemens, Bonds and McGwire are disgraces, players are backing off and we’re seeing the results. So medical technology in 2007 could not detect a torn hip labrum but could in 2008? Please. Right, the MRI was just invented.

    I love the poster who quoted the strength coach. Brian McNamee was a “strength coach” once. They might as well call them supplement coaches What do you think he is going to say?

  45. Angel (F) - 'Cos you know I was OPP(C), hell from the very start June 20th, 2009 at 1:19 pm

    “I wouldn’t be so quick to write the guy’s professional obituary just yet.”

    My thoughts exactly.

    But I realize there is precious little to write about if it isn’t the case.

  46. Andy In Sunny Daytona June 20th, 2009 at 1:22 pm

    That’s pretty bold Pete saying that Carlos Delgado, Mike Lowell and Chase Uttley all used steroids in such a round about way. Bravo!

    Also, I thought Dr. Philippon and Dr. Lindsay wree on record saying that this injury had nothing to do with PED’s?

    All of a sudden a beat reporter knows better than the two best doctors in their respective fields?

  47. Carl June 20th, 2009 at 1:24 pm

    “That’s pretty bold Pete saying that Carlos Delgado, Mike Lowell and Chase Uttley all used steroids in such a round about way. Bravo!

    Also, I thought Dr. Philippon and Dr. Lindsay wree on record saying that this injury had nothing to do with PED’s?

    All of a sudden a beat reporter knows better than the two best doctors in their respective fields?”

    lol

  48. SJ44 June 20th, 2009 at 1:25 pm

    I don’t think anybody is discounting PED usage or how widespread it was in the game.

    I think what some of us are saying is, we need more proof to make the causal connection that these injuries are a by product of PED usage.

    While I understand its natural to leap to that conclusion, I’m hesitant to do it without more proof from the medical community.

  49. Carl June 20th, 2009 at 1:27 pm

    SJ44

    Pete is the medical community.

  50. Angel (F) - 'Cos you know I was OPP(C), hell from the very start June 20th, 2009 at 1:28 pm

    I was under the impression he was always going to need a second surgery. That this was just going to be enough to get him through the year – at 80% or so.

  51. S.A.--The sun will come out tomorrow; I'm down with the OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 1:29 pm

    I think what some of us are saying is, we need more proof to make the causal connection that these injuries are a by product of PED usage.

    While I understand its natural to leap to that conclusion, I’m hesitant to do it without more proof from the medical community.

    =============================

    Yup. Agreed

  52. Shame Spencer June 20th, 2009 at 1:31 pm

    angel, youre right, he does need another surgery.

    i agree with sj44, no one is discounting PED usage, but Arod was also known for playing pretty much every game for most of his career. the hip could be caused by a gradual deterioration of the hip just as easily as it could have been his PED use. i dont know if we’ll know the real affects of steroid use in MLB for a while.. but these guys opened themselves up to this type of criticism in the first place, so Pete isnt totally at fault for pointing it out.

  53. SJ44 June 20th, 2009 at 1:32 pm

    I’ll give you an example of an injury getting more play than it used to. Basically because they changed the name of the injury.

    A sports hernia.

    Back when I played, that was a “groin strain” or a “pulled stomach muscle”.

    One of the reasons the name was changed was because players often got ripped for missing too much time over a “pulled stomach muscle”. The inferernce being, it wasn’t a serious injury and the guy was just dogging it.

    The actual injury is in fact, a tear in abdominal region. An injury serious enough to put you on the shelf for sometime.

    Hence, the new term, “sports hernia”. Sounds more severe, and it keeps the fans and media from alleging a guy is dogging it.

    In other words, today’s “sports hernia” is the 70′s and 80′s “pulled stomach muscle” or “groin strain”.

  54. stuart a June 20th, 2009 at 1:32 pm

    why was my negative post about peter and his arod love not posted???

    arod whom I am not a fan of should not even be playing. he got 1/2 of his procedure.

    newsflash he is not going to run this year in his condition.

    exagerration and ill informed is status quo for sports writers in NY, so peter fits right in..

  55. SJ44 June 20th, 2009 at 1:33 pm

    Alex’s doctor has said its 50-50 whether or not he will need additional surgery.

    That decision will be made after the season.

  56. Boston Dave - OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 1:33 pm

    “anyway, bottom line it looks like the red sox paid a fortune for matsuzaka.”

    ——-

    randy,

    I am far from an expert. I just think it’s worth bringing up that the cost for Daisuke, which is somewhat unique due to the Japanese posting system, is much different than the straightforward nature of most MLB contracts (aside from a select few that have delayed payments with or w/o interest – Gary Sheffield for example).

    If you want to criticize the Yanks for paying CC, or even the Mets for Santana, that’s fine.

    My contention is that the Daisuke contract falls into that category and CC and Santana carried less risk.

    It’s a dry topic for many but if you or SJ44 have more insight into how the posting fees are affecting “baseball accounting” I’d be interested.

  57. Peter Abraham June 20th, 2009 at 1:34 pm

    The point I’m making is that this is all new to baseball. Nobody knows for sure what the cause and results are. Now that the steroids era is supposedly over and testing is in place, this is what there is to deal with.

    Nobody can say for sure what injuries are legit and what are not. But it’s hard in my view to give anybody the benefit of the doubt. Baseball forfeited that right with their inattention to this matter. That falls on Selig and the union.

  58. EGK June 20th, 2009 at 1:36 pm

    One word to describe this. “A(lbatross)-Rod”

  59. *Denise* June 20th, 2009 at 1:36 pm

    I’ve been saying this all along, look at Ortiz and what he’s going thru, hmmmm you think he wasn’t on steroids? He’s prob not now and look at his struggles. If it is true that A-Rod has been known to be taking PEDs since HS, then this absolutely can be a by product of the ‘roids. Surgery, sure, will exasperate this issue, and of course, the Yankees didn’t fail to surprise me on how they handled it, but A-Rod too should say something on a day off here and there. And he doesn’t b/c he wants to play everyday with an injury like Jeter? Please A-Rod, you will never be Derek Jeter, NEVER and why now would you be so worried about pride and what people think?

  60. 86w183 June 20th, 2009 at 1:36 pm

    Dave — I understand compound interest, but 10 percent in the last two years would be PHENOMENAL return, not a conservative estimate. Isn’t the Dow down about 40 % over that time? And even with your rosy scenario you came up $ 10 Million shy of your $ 150 claim. Still, I’m not sure that it really matters.

    If you are going to add interest lost to the bonus then you have to reduce the “csot” of the subsequent annual payments accordingly which you conveniently chose not to do.

    As a member of the media I can assure all of you that there is no group of people less informed about medical issues on the planet. They don’t do their homework on it because it’s too time consuming. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard guys refer to muscle sprains (you don’t sprain muscles, you strain them) and how much better a ligament sprain is than a partial tear (it’s the same thing). So it stands to reason that ill-informed/under educated people would try to find a causal link between steroid use and a torn hip labrum where none exists.

    SJ is right… labrum tears are cause by overuse. I think we may be headed toward a new, more enlightened era of sports conditioning where all athletes take 60-90 days off from all but aerobic and flexibility activities.

  61. m June 20th, 2009 at 1:36 pm

    With or without residual effects of steroid use, this contract was horrible. HORRIBLE.

    But, it is what it is. And as Yankee fans, we have to hope for the best.

    Right now, we have to concentrate on getting through this particular season without killing Alex.

    I hope that Girardi realizes that sitting certain players doesn’t kill the team’s chances of winning games. In fact I know he knows this because he sits key guys all the time.

    In some perverse way it, in Girardi’s mind, he could’ve thought this was Alex’s ST and his way of having Alex play catch up. Just don’t understand why he didn’t see that Alex had totally fell off the cliff.

    But anyway, if we knew all the answers, we’d be in the manager’s office, not blogging on the LoHud.

  62. 55 June 20th, 2009 at 1:37 pm

    “You are hopelessly naive if you don’t think a large percentage of players were doing something.”

    Strawman. Nobody ever said this. Don’t change the question from “Did steroids cause labrum injuries?” to “Did baseball players do steroids?” Everyone knows the answer to the latter question.

    We have quotes from experts saying the nature of the injury makes it unlikely to be linked to steroids (“In fact it’s more of a repetitive injury so I wouldn’t say it was consistent with use (of steroids),” Colvin said in a phone interview.”). The burden of proof is on you if you want to contradict that.

    “So medical technology in 2007 could not detect a torn hip labrum but could in 2008?”

    Um, hello? Didn’t Alex, Bonds, McGwire, etc. use steroids way before 2007? If the diagnosing ability was present that year, wouldn’t it have picked something up? After all, as you said yourself, the drug problem was widespread.

    Finally, good job attacking the messenger (“But he’s a strength coach!!!”). Even if we ignore him, you’re still ignoring the other source.

    Geez, they obviously don’t teach logic wherever you went to school.

  63. Boston Dave - OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 1:38 pm

    I don’t know if Pete was suggesting that it was clearly PED use as much as he’s correctly raising the question that it’s possible and in some cases likely.

    Since nobody wants to come clean about the past 15 years of rampant drug use in MLB, we’re forced to try to connect the dots.

    When you’re missing dots, different people will “draw” different conclusions.

    I’d like to think and I do believe that Alex will still be a great player for the next 8 years but who knows…

  64. Terry from NH June 20th, 2009 at 1:39 pm

    Maybe i’ll get blasted for this, but I would go all out if i’m the Yankees management and see if they can obtain Mark DeRosa to fill the bench and start at 3rd for Arod when needed. This guy can hit and play multiple positions and seems to me to be the answer for alot of the problems the Yanks have with bench and occasional starter.. When you have Berroa and Pena on the bench with hardly any offense then you go and get a guy like DeRosa.

  65. m June 20th, 2009 at 1:39 pm

    And I don’t care how good an athlete Alex is, age will become a larger factor than former PED use.

  66. Benji June 20th, 2009 at 1:41 pm

    H/T to RAB.

    http://riveraveblues.com/2009/.....ies-13449/

  67. Boston Dave - OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 1:41 pm

    “Dave—- I understand compound interest, but 10 percent in the last two years would be PHENOMENAL return, not a conservative estimate.”

    ———–

    hindsight is 20/20. Perhaps they could have spent the money to buy real estate funds which are at their lowest point in years. When the market rebounds, the $51M they spent on Daisuke will be worth $250M.

    Who knows… the point is, at the time the posting fee was paid, the total cost carried a value of much higher than the $100M that people continuously reported.

    I suggest that this was incorrect to do because $51M up front is not the same as $51M over the course of 6 years. That’s all.

  68. *Denise* June 20th, 2009 at 1:41 pm

    and by the way, Tito finally dropped Ortiz in the order to let him work things out, and he started to respond…started to….What did Girardi do? keep him in Cleanup of all spots!!

  69. 86w183 June 20th, 2009 at 1:42 pm

    SJ — Funny comments on injuries. It’s a medical thing… guys used to get bruises, now they get contusions. You used to get a cut, now it’s a laceration. I think the medical folks get paid more if it sounds more serious…. just llike the sports hernia.

    Pete — Don’t take the MEDIA out of the blame for the steroid era. Professionalism went in the crapper in 1998 as everyone who covered the game became cheerleaders despite Sosa having acne that would embarrass a 12 year old and McGuire getting caught with Andro.

    Sosa got caught with a corked bat, but wasn’t labeled a “cheater”. If Alex got caught with a corked bat the media would likely call for chemical castration. Hypocritical sanctimony is alive and well.

  70. Patrick June 20th, 2009 at 1:43 pm

    “Nobody can say for sure what injuries are legit and what are not.”

    This is simply untrue. Maybe uninformed fans and sportswriters can make this claim but what about doctors who have worked in this field for decades? Several doctors have already said that these hip injuries existed in the past but were never diagnosed properly.

    This whole story is a fabrication created to drum up more discussion about steroids and get blog hits.

  71. Bronx Jeers June 20th, 2009 at 1:44 pm

    Not that this subject isn’t legit. But none of us can see into the future.

    My kingdom for an early game thread.

    Is this a homecoming for AJ?

    Scouting on Josh Johnson?

  72. Boston Dave - OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 1:44 pm

    “And even with your rosy scenario you came up $ 10 Million shy of your $ 150 claim.”

    ———

    I said a case could be made that it was closer to $150M.

    And when you are dropping $51M, you’d hope you could beat the S&P500 average. Otherwise you’d sink that money into an S&P500 index fund with far less risk.

    So, I would think an investor would prob expect a minimum of 15-20% annual return on something that carried decent risk.

    Doesn’t matter.. all I was trying to get to was the contradiction in criticizing a contract like Sabathia’s without looking at other high-priced contracts for less qualified pitchers.

  73. Erica - newly OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 1:44 pm

    I think the Yankee brass was so happy with the result of how things were going when A-Rod came back (teamwise) that they got arrogant and didn’t bother remembering the doctor’s orders.

  74. *Denise* June 20th, 2009 at 1:46 pm

    here’s Buster Olney’s report today:

    # The Yankees are unlikely to trade Nick Swisher or Xavier Nady when the latter returns from an elbow injury because of the club’s needs. Olney also mentions that they wouldn’t be able to get full market value for Nady because of his injury.
    # The Yanks did discuss Nady with other clubs during the offseason after signing Mark Teixeira.
    # Several teams walked away from Pedro Martinez’s workout yesterday unimpressed and uninterested in signing him.
    # Olney says that several teams would be interested in the future Hall of Famer if he decides to pitch for something close to the pro-rated minimum with incentives, and is willing to work his way back up through the minors.

  75. Drive 4-5 June 20th, 2009 at 1:47 pm

    “Maybe it already is.”

    Way to give up on him aleady. That falls in line with most of the nattering nabobs of negativism.

    Why not mention that Verducci’s stats coincide with his hip injury? A Rod was feeling it the second half of last season. Instead, let’s plant the seed that A Rod might be headed to a nosedive the rest of his career. How ’bout coming to that conclusion after his hip feels. Right now of his jnjury thats lead to his stats. it’s the incompetency of the Yankee’s management

  76. randy l. June 20th, 2009 at 1:47 pm

    “It’s a dry topic for many but if you or SJ44 have more insight into how the posting fees are affecting “baseball accounting” I’d be interested.”

    i think how money is paid out and handled as far as baseball accounting is interesting because the one strategic advantage the yankees have almost always had is they know how to make money .

    the red sox with henry being a billionaire brougt the red sox closer to the yankees than ever before, but henry’s net worth i may be 1/3 what it used to be. that has to affect how the red sox do business. we haven’t seen any big matsuzaka type spending splashes in a while , and it may be a long time before we do again from the red sox.

  77. stuart a June 20th, 2009 at 1:47 pm

    getting Derosa would absolutely not be a bad idea. I assume the price will be to high.

    SJ I heard the trimming of the socket must be done on arod…

    and pete always usues numbers in a way to try to support his claim or goal.. arod from what I have read has been playing with the hip injury for at least the last 6 weeks of last year.

    arod in management should be fined or fired because this issue was not addressed last october……………………………………..

    yea arod is only good because of peds……….I do not believe that for a second….his contract is not good because it is obscenly expensive while no one else would have paid even close to that and you can thank loud nouth steiiny for that but his contract compared to others is far from the worst…arod will give them a positive return just not cost effective, there are many players that give no return…….

  78. Erica - newly OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 1:47 pm

    Denise-

    Please tell me the Yankees were smart enough to be one of the teams that walked away from Pedro disinterested

  79. Boston Dave - OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 1:48 pm

    “Scouting on Josh Johnson?”

    ——

    IMO, he’s very good. :)

    I think he can hit 96-97 with his fastball. He also throws a slider and a change.

    He may have had control issues in the past (I didnt check) but his walks are great so far this season (23 in just under 100IP)

  80. YankeeVIP June 20th, 2009 at 1:48 pm

    this shows that girardi has some serious flaws when dealing with veterans and managing the players.

    the fact cashman has to get involved shows girardi has some issues

  81. SJ44 June 20th, 2009 at 1:48 pm

    Can’t you say that about all sports?

    Look at the Super Bowl team hoto of the 1974 Pittsburgh Steelers and see how many of them are dead and how they died.

    Many of them by illnesses associated with rampant PED use.

    Yet, nobody scrutinzes football as they do baseball. Not a single national sports columnist or broadcaster has questioned anybody in the NFL about widespread PED usage.

    A doctor in Charlotte was busted a few years ago and it was found that he sold steroids to over 30 members of the Super Bowl Carolina Panthers team. He went to jail and the story died. Nobody dug into to and discussed the players involved in the story.

    Contrast that with PED/baseball stories.

    Shouldn’t NFL players and the league in general forfeit their “benefit of the doubt” rights?

    Its unnatural to have so many 300+ pound guys in the NFL. Its almost triple the amount from just 15 years ago.

    Yet, nobody questions NFL players and PED usage. Even when guys get caught, nobody froths about banning them from the Hall of Fame, wonder why they aren’t getting indicted, etc.

    PED usage in sports, in one form or another, has gone on for years.

    The old saying of, “if you ain’t cheatin’, you ain’t tryin’”, has been part of the sports environment forever.

    What people who are interested in this topic ought to do is interview doctors and a guy like Victor Conte, who will grant interviews to just about anybody.

    You will learn more from these folks than just speculating on the subject.

  82. Angel (F) - 'Cos you know I was OPP(C), hell from the very start June 20th, 2009 at 1:48 pm

    Surgery, sure, will exasperate this issue, and of course, the Yankees didn’t fail to surprise me on how they handled it, but A-Rod too should say something on a day off here and there. And he doesn’t b/c he wants to play everyday with an injury like Jeter? Please A-Rod, you will never be Derek Jeter, NEVER and why now would you be so worried about pride and what people think?

    *********************************************************

    Wants to be like Jeter? *snort*

    He’s always wanted to play every day, even when he wasn’t a Yankee. He’s an athlete. You don’t understand the athlete mentality at all if you can simplify it to something as trite and stupid as “wanting to be like someone else”.

  83. Erica - newly OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 1:50 pm

    Here’s the part of the A-Rod enigma, I cannot fathom-

    If A-Rod was flexing his hip the second half of last season and feeling discomfort then- why was it the issue never came up until March when the Yanks were trying to keep him out of the WBC. Seriously. He could have had surgery during the offseason and had a proper srping training (as opposed to the June spring training we are supposed to be patient during)

    Maybe Cashman is right and baseball players should be treated as pets who don’t know they are injured

  84. Boston Dave - OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 1:51 pm

    “Yet, nobody scrutinzes football as they do baseball. Not a single national sports columnist or broadcaster has questioned anybody in the NFL about widespread PED usage.”

    ——–

    do you think that is because of the statistical nature of baseball (as has been said by many re: this point) ?

    Or is it because people feel that it’s almost necessary due to the physical nature of football?

    You’re right. It’s amazing how football gets a free pass but MLB is crucified for the same thing.

  85. SJ44 June 20th, 2009 at 1:52 pm

    No, it doesn’t. On decisions like this, Cashman is always involved because he’s the GM. It has nothing to do with Girardi and his relationship with Alex.

    If you are going to troll around here, at least be good at it.

  86. *Denise* June 20th, 2009 at 1:52 pm

    and the Yankees have Roger Clemens to blame for ‘roid use, mostly. Before he came to town, we didn’t have a Brian McNamee in our clubhouse, going to his boy Radomski across town getting them for the players. Obviously, having McNamee there made it easy for them to get, and I do understand that if they really wanted it, they could get it, but I don’t think that was really the case after reading Joe Torre’s book. It was there, it was easy, so they used it.

  87. Bruce E June 20th, 2009 at 1:52 pm

    While there are some causes for concern, I think its early to say that Alex is a player in “sharp decline”. Alex goes in major funks, its part of who he is. I remember him being much more lost at the plate than he has been.

  88. Bronx Born June 20th, 2009 at 1:54 pm

    SJ – Why is it that baseball gets so much media attention on PED’s and other sports do not? What’s your take on this? I have never understood it.

  89. Erica - newly OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 1:55 pm

    Denise-

    That is not true. Giambi came over in 2001 and brought over his own “trainer”. I am willing to bet that Roger Clemens did not invent steroids in the Yankee clubhouse in 1999.

    From what I recall of Joe Torre’s book, they were rampant in NY in the mid-90s. You can’t blame Clemens for that too

  90. Boston Dave - OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 1:56 pm

    “the Yankees have Roger Clemens to blame for ‘roid use, mostly.”

    ——

    IMO, this is the problem.

    Stop singling people out and start to accept that it was a huge, widespread issue.

    Guys like Clemens, Bonds, ARod, etc are the fall guys.

    One one hand they deserve it.

    On another they don’t deserve to be singled out just because their names will sell more newspapers.

  91. *Denise* June 20th, 2009 at 1:57 pm

    Angel,

    everyone knows A-Rod wants to be like DJ….not just for playing every day, but everything else. who wouldn’t, really? and please don’t assume that I don’t understand athelete mentality any less than you do. However, if you are playing with the contract as Alex is, you really need to be more responsible in communicating what is going on as posted earlier, he could have had surgery earlier in the off-season and not been thrown back into action right away. That, fact alone, is what I’m referring to.

  92. RalphieD (OPPC all day) June 20th, 2009 at 1:57 pm

    im watching yankee encore right now and melancon is about to give up that triple to gary matthews jr..ya gotta think if he just got that out he might of still been here…he’ll be back tho

  93. Erica - newly OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 1:58 pm

    Boston Dave-

    That is the exact reason its only a matter of time until we learn the other 102 names on the infamous list.

    Part of me doesn’t want to know, and the other part just wants them to get it over with instead of this list leaking out name by name

  94. 86w183 June 20th, 2009 at 1:59 pm

    Coming soon the Yankees will announce their “ARod Rules” to ensure the manager doesn’t screw up the player.

    My suggested ARod rules would be never more than four straight games at 3B. At least one full day off every two weeks and at least one day as a DH every week.

    I think I’ll go patent the T-shirt.

    SJ — You know why football steroid use and baseball is treated differently. The national media covering football did the homework and learned what steroids do and what they don’t do and put steroid use in its proper context.

    Baseball’s national media has not burdened itself with becoming educated on the subject and uses bellicose pronouncements and language to demonize those who used or may have used steroids.

  95. Boston Dave - OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 1:59 pm

    “everyone knows A-Rod wants to be like DJ….not just for playing every day, but everything else. who wouldn’t, really?”

    ———-

    like you said, who wouldn’t?

    if players want to model themselves after DJ, they deserve to be applauded and not criticized.

    I’d like to give Alex a clean slate starting with this season.

    In his own way, he has asked for that.

    All things considered, I think it’s a good idea to grant him that.

  96. Angel (F) - 'Cos you know I was OPP(C), hell from the very start June 20th, 2009 at 2:01 pm

    everyone knows A-Rod wants to be like DJ….not just for playing every day, but everything else. who wouldn’t, really? and please don’t assume that I don’t understand athelete mentality any less than you do.

    ******************************************

    What else am I suppose to assume from your statement then? It was trite and ridiculous, and showed a lack of knowledge.

    “everyone knows”? AKA Joe Torre’s book?

    Please.

  97. Boston Dave - OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 2:02 pm

    Erica,

    you’re probably right.

    that list (pardon my analogy) is kind of like a celebrity sex tape.

    it’s only a matter of time before it gets leaked and people see it.

    we live in a world where salacious journalism dominates the competition.

  98. SJ44 June 20th, 2009 at 2:02 pm

    Boston Dave,

    I think its because nobody in the media wants to take on the NFL. They enjoy the cozy relationship they have with the league. If you have ever seen NFL-media related functions, you would know what I mean.

    Steve Wilstein was the AP reporter who found the andro in Mark McGuire’s locker and asked him about it.

    He got DESTROYED by many of the same national columnists who now moralize against PED usage and baseball players.

    Guys in his own professional CRUSHED him. Some of them even tried to get his credentials pulled for DOING HIS JOB.

    Now, 11 years later, he’s vindicated. Still waiting to hear apologies from some of his collegues on the way he was treated. None have been forthcoming.

    Nobody wants to take on the NFL in the media. They would rather throw their darts at baseball because Bud and the Union have done such a poor job on this issue.

    As far as I’m concerned, its selective sports morality. Its why I pay little attention to it.

    I’ve always maintained this story, PED usage among athletes, is the most overblown and overrated story of our lifetimes. Its been going on for years in one form or another. Fans don’t care about it. The media really doesn’t care about it. Not enough to investigate the NFL OR find out more about it other than just speculate who does it and who doesn’t.

    Do I like PED’s in the game? No, I don’t. I hate it and made sure my nephew was never part of that culture. Thank God he isn’t.

    Those who can do something about it, don’t. So, after making sure someone close to me isn’t involved in it, I realize that’s all I can do about the subject.

  99. BBFan June 20th, 2009 at 2:02 pm

    “I don’t think anybody is discounting PED usage or how widespread it was in the game.

    I think what some of us are saying is, we need more proof to make the causal connection that these injuries are a by product of PED usage.

    While I understand its natural to leap to that conclusion, I’m hesitant to do it without more proof from the medical community.”

    It is a waste of time tooting the horn to the deaf ear :)

  100. Erica - newly OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 2:03 pm

    Actually Boston Dave-

    That is a pretty good metaphor :-)

  101. charleston2 June 20th, 2009 at 2:03 pm

    All of you sound ridiculous right now. Alex is notorious for going into slumps and has been his entire time with the Yankees. He has won the MVP in 2003, 2005, and 2007. Alex came back from hip surgery and immediately crushed a homerun on his first pitch. He has shown a significant amount of power since coming back in a short span. Sure, it should be more, but he hasn’t been rested.

    Alex is not your typical roid user and he will turn things around. Alex is a 35HR, 120RBI guy every single season, regardless. He works way too hard for his body to wear down the way that the un-fit Giambi’s did.

    Alex is a much better player talent wise than anyone else in this game, pretty much. You guys really think the most talented player in baseball (or close to it) is going to have the same rules apply to him as to other washed-up, medicore (without steroids) players? Give me a break. This guy is going to rake and rake often for the next X years, before he retires early from the pressure.

    You guys sound ridiculous right now.

  102. Bronx Jeers June 20th, 2009 at 2:03 pm

    Mike Webster’s story is one of the saddest in what is in my opinion perhaps the ugliest and most overlooked atrocities in American sport. The NFL and the union seems to have basically “eaten their old”

    When I was a kid I used to love the Steelers and remember thinking how the arms of the offensive line looked like “popped hot dogs”

    Jack Lambert was my favorite player.

  103. Boston Dave - OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 2:07 pm

    SJ44,

    great analysis.

    I forgot about the McGwire situation.

  104. BBFan June 20th, 2009 at 2:10 pm

    “Maybe i’ll get blasted for this, but I would go all out if i’m the Yankees management and see if they can obtain Mark DeRosa to fill the bench and start at 3rd for Arod when needed.”

    Why would you be blasted? It is a good suggestion, though it may not happen.

  105. Brandon 5 Cena ZEEEEEEROOOO "Because I'm AWESOME !" June 20th, 2009 at 2:13 pm

    “Maybe i’ll get blasted for this, but I would go all out if i’m the Yankees management and see if they can obtain Mark DeRosa to fill the bench and start at 3rd for Arod when needed.”

    El Nino thinks this is a bad idea.

  106. BBFan June 20th, 2009 at 2:13 pm

    “The point I’m making is that this is all new to baseball. Nobody knows for sure what the cause and results are. Now that the steroids era is supposedly over and testing is in place, this is what there is to deal with.

    Nobody can say for sure what injuries are legit and what are not. But it’s hard in my view to give anybody the benefit of the doubt. Baseball forfeited that right with their inattention to this matter. That falls on Selig and the union.”

    This is valid and better way of putting it.
    But this boog entry at the top is different from what you are stating here.

  107. Boston Dave - OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 2:14 pm

    Adding DeRosa is fine. It’s a matter of cost.

    The Yanks may have more pressing needs (bullpen).

    I’m sure Cashman will explore as many avenues as he can.

  108. Lara08 June 20th, 2009 at 2:14 pm

    What is really sad is this continued myth that this generation of baseball players introduced drugs into baseball. Baseball players were doing more than amphetamines before Pettitte, Rodriguez and the likes were even born.

    That’s one more reason why this is, as SJ phrased it, selective morality. If the media, analyst and other “caretakers” of the game truly cared they would put PED use in baseball in its proper context. If not, then it can’t be taken seriously.

    And the “excuse” that baseball went kicking and screaming before they did something about steroids and that’s why the criticism is more harsh is absurd.

    Overkill is a great way to turn away otherwise open-minded people.

    I’ll take the “caretakers” seriously when they get serious about the discussion of PEDs in baseball.

  109. Friend June 20th, 2009 at 2:16 pm

    I thought that in order to be a sports journalist and beat writer, you had to be objective? If that is the case, how do you still have a job?

    Look, just come out and say you hate A-Rod and have an agenda against. Don’t lie, because you do. No problem, just admit it.

    On Twitter you wrote, “Is “fatigue” code for “no longer on steroids and/or HGH?” Only eight more years of this.”

    1. With that statement you can’t deny a disdain for him which does get in your way of objective reporting, which is what I, at least, look for when reading a paper.

    2. Just man up and ask him that. Don’t twitter it. Ask him.

  110. Boston Dave - OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 2:19 pm

    “On Twitter you wrote, “Is “fatigue” code for “no longer on steroids and/or HGH?” Only eight more years of this.” ”

    ———

    if that is true, shame on Pete.

  111. V June 20th, 2009 at 2:22 pm

    This topic is Christmas morning for Pete. Bashing A-Rod and Giradi at the same time!

  112. Toilet Blog June 20th, 2009 at 2:23 pm

    P.A. is one of the absolute pathetic sports journalists i’ve come across. Of course, his employer is hardly of any consequence in the tri-state area. It’s pretty much unknown. I stumbled across this page through a link on a Yankee forum. What a joke.

  113. BBFan June 20th, 2009 at 2:26 pm

    “On Twitter you wrote, “Is “fatigue” code for “no longer on steroids and/or HGH?” Only eight more years of this.” ”

    If it is true, I do not twitter, shame on you Pete. Your hatred for A-Rod going too far. When Andy was having bad spell befor last night game, did you think the same way? It is real double standard, isn’t it?

  114. BBFan June 20th, 2009 at 2:30 pm

    “El Nino thinks this is a bad idea.”

    That is true.

    Even if they do not get Mark DeRosa, when Cody is ready El Nino will be sent to AAA to get him cosistent work. He will be september call up.

  115. Michael June 20th, 2009 at 2:32 pm

    Great reporting Pete.

  116. GC June 20th, 2009 at 2:35 pm

    “maybe it is” implies doubt.

    it is the worst contract in sports, made worse by bringing him back after he opted out freeing the yankees of this albatros. terrible job hank, ca$h & co.

  117. Mike Axisa June 20th, 2009 at 2:37 pm

    Pete,

    How come we don’t hear anything about a steep decline and PEDs when Andy Pettitte puts up a 5.33 ERA with a .875 OPS against during a nine start stretch like he did earlier this year? What about when Jason Giambi went down with one of his many ailments or spent a month below the Mendoza? All we ever heard about was how much fun and how great of a guy he was.

  118. S.A.--The sun will come out tomorrow; I'm down with the OPPC June 20th, 2009 at 2:39 pm

    Heyman twitter:

    call to rest a-rod came from cashman after conf. call with cash, boss hal and a-rod, who admitted exhaustion.

  119. 86w183 June 20th, 2009 at 2:42 pm

    There should be a rule here that anyone who endorses acquiring a player must also propose the price they are willing to pay for that player.

    Obviously DeRosa would be a very nice player to have… a month ago. With Nady about to be ready I don’t think the likely price (Robertson and another pitching prospect like Kontos) is worth paying.

    Other thoughts?

  120. *Denise* June 20th, 2009 at 2:43 pm

    Angel,

    funny: is all I can say….don’t really know how to respond to that without being criticized by you!

  121. John June 20th, 2009 at 2:46 pm

    Also Pete,

    Why do you always hyperbole so much? Last week you said it would be a failure to win 2/3 vs. the Nationals in a mid June series. It’s NEVER a failure to win 2/3.

    Now you say A-Rod’s contract will be the worst, not just in the history of MLB, but in all of sports history!!!!! What about Carl Pavano, Stephon Marbury, Ryan Leaf, I could go on and on! That was a ridiculous statement and I’m glad people are calling you out for your hate of the man.

    A-Rod has struggled massively in the past few weeks where he’s played every single day after coming back early from hip surgery. Even though he’s struggled, he still has an .880 OPS as you pointed out. Players as good as A-Rod aren’t very common, but you keep talking about the gritty and gutty Brett Gardner like he’s even on the same level.

  122. talltenor June 20th, 2009 at 2:48 pm

    A-Rod’s ego + Yankees’ ego = Hubris all around.

  123. gayle June 20th, 2009 at 2:54 pm

    sj–

    wilstein is a finalist for the slinks award thus year will be interesting to see how that goes

  124. Ed H. June 20th, 2009 at 2:56 pm

    Point 1: Alex is recovering from a significant injury (hip impingement/labrum tear/cyst) followed by significant surgery that only partially repaired the problem and then rehab.

    Point 2: Alex missed spring training and rushed his return to the team in order to turn around the Yankees’ floundering season.

    Point 3: Doctors, including Marc Philippon state unequivocally that there is no medical evidence to support that Alex’s injury can be caused by PED use.

    Point 4: The Yankees failed to follow instructions given by Drs. Philippon and Lindsay stating that Alex should be rested once every five to 10 games during the first 45 games following his return.

    Point 5: Dr. Philippon has published that 93% of professional athletes who have this surgery return to previous performance levels or better following rehab and recovery.

    Conclusion: It is absurd to be diving back into the Alex steroid wars following this setback

  125. Friend June 20th, 2009 at 3:38 pm

    To BBFan and Boston Dave

    http://twitter.com/PeteAbe/status/2244613743

    That’s the link.

    I don’t do twitter but a fellow Yankee fan sent that to me.

    Again, I’m involved with the profession of journalism and maybe beat writers who cover teams can have blatant opinions and agendas that might be associated with an opinion writer or the like. If that’s the case than whatever. If not, then, someone should just be honest with his readers.

  126. Heyzeus June 20th, 2009 at 3:51 pm

    No question it’s the worst contract in sports history. $275 million for a guy already over 30 is ridiculous to begin with. Incentives to break Bonds’ career-homers record? Absurd, because it leads to Rod going for the long ball when other approaches could help the team. Not to mention the fact that we re-signed this guy not knowing that his pre-trade numbers were inflated and that his body would someday pay for the steroids inflicted on it. Nor the fact that we could’ve been out from under this bozo a couple of years ago, free and clear. That all adds up to the perfect s—storm of contracts. I doubt we’ll see one as bad for a long time.

  127. Ovaltine June 20th, 2009 at 4:45 pm

    Sticking to their plans might not be the best, because the plan itself might not be good. See Wang’s case. Yankees sticked to their plan for Wang’s rehab and the outcome was …

  128. Don June 20th, 2009 at 5:00 pm

    You’d be blind to ignore the bias that both Pete and Verducci have against A-Rod.

    They have absolutely no evidence his “fatigue” is tied to being off HGH and their commentaries are apocryphal.

    A-Rod has been battling a hip injury since last summer, is working his way back to 100% and in doing so still has 4 more homers and only 2 less ribbies in 100 less abs.

    Unfortunately Pete’s agenda with A-Rod is as transparent as a US politician – devious.

  129. Don June 20th, 2009 at 5:01 pm

    4 more homers and 2 less ribbies than Ortiz.

  130. Tom B June 20th, 2009 at 6:23 pm

    i saw something above that really irked me(sj44). if you dont think that alex’s hip is bothering him, then you are either blind, or just not watching the games. he doesn’t drive off his hip, he is slow to turn them and his swing is all arms. he almost falls over every time he swings at a low&away pitch. in the field, he doesnt plant and launch the ball to first base anymore. there is a considerable loop and weakness to his throws because he cant drive forward off his back leg.

  131. Don June 20th, 2009 at 6:59 pm

    Tom B. – he has always looped his throws over to 1B.

    Lets just let the guy play out of his slump starting Sunday, leave him alone, and watch Pete and Tom “Torre is my Gravy Train” Verducci eat their words at year’s end.

  132. Jay June 21st, 2009 at 4:14 am

    If it’s not one of the worst contracts (for the team) in sports history, it will be in the final years as Alex nears eligibility for Social Security.

    Not to worry though since the contract offers several great advantages — to everyone who hates the Yankees and competes with them. Just think how tough it would be to compete with the Yankees if they didn’t flush tens of millions a year down a rat hole and pay a luxury tax on it to boot. They might actually be able to beat, or at least compete with, every team in baseball — aside from the Red Sox, of course, who understand the concept of underpaying everyone, especially older players, as a competitive advantage, not to mention the importance of getting a lower percentage of their runs from home runs if the idea is to win against better pitching, better teams, and in the post season.

    Another advantage of having a $30 million a year 40+ year old on the team is that it will make Jeter and who knows who else that much more comfortable…

  133. Marcy June 21st, 2009 at 10:00 am

    Jeez, it’s not just the Yankees losing money if Alex doesn’t recover–it’s almost criminal of Girardi et al to go against his doctors and allow him to play when he should have been recovering from surgery. And it took Cashman to say something? That sucks.

  134. Fan Interference June 21st, 2009 at 2:16 pm

    It’s a terrible contract, and one that should have never been given. The guy opted out, and Cashman said that if he did, the Yankees were “Done” with him. It was until Hank stuck his nose into the baseball business that this ridiculous contract was given to Arod, based on his ability to break the Home Run record “Clean.” Nevermind that the contract ran until the guy was 42. Now the Yankees are stuck with a declining player entering his mid-thirties, with a tainted career, and a huge contract. It’s like Giambi again, but worse. At least Giambi was/is generally liked around the league. Arod is despised around the country. Nice job Hank & Hal, you got the player you deserved for your short-sightedness..for the next eight years.

  135. Greg June 22nd, 2009 at 7:04 pm

    It was one of the last “bubble” deals, and we all know how those have gone, and not just in sports. Imagine if the NYY’s had done the right thing when Alex opted out, and just said “good luck”. Where would he have gone? Who would have signed him for anything over $100M?

  136. Jim S June 23rd, 2009 at 11:39 am

    You have to expect any professional ballplayer to want to play. That’s why there are managers and general managers to help them decide when they should sit instead. I have no great love for A-Rod, but he is not to blame for this fiasco. In that sense, it reminds me of Pedro Martinez not wanting to come out of game 7 of the 2003 ALCS. Of course he didn’t want to come out. I think if Pedro’s right arm fell off he would ask for some duct tape and tell the manager he could get the next hitter-even if it was Albert Pujols. Does this mean that Joe Girardi is the NYY equivalent of Grady Little?

  137. Mark S. June 23rd, 2009 at 12:16 pm

    “Tom Verducci had a great stat yesterday: Alex is hitting .246 since he turned 33 last July 27. If you look at those numbers more closely, he has an .880 OPS.”

    That’s not a great stat. That’s what we like to call a “selective endpoint” stat. Unless the Fairy Godmother’s spell magically wore off at the stroke of midnight on A-Rod’s 33rd birthday.

  138. Girl June 24th, 2009 at 11:31 am

    Madonna is so 2008, I blame Kate Hudson.

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