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A New York Yankees blog by Chad Jennings and the staff of The Journal News


Kind of a weird night

Posted by: Chad Jennings - Posted in Misc on Aug 14, 2010 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

As last night unfolded, there came a point when it stopped feeling like a baseball game. It was too disjointed. The teams tied out of the gate. Then Billy Butler got a home to bang off the foul pole. Then neither team did much of anything. It was nothing but a series of snapshots, with rain in between.

“It was just kind of a weird night,” Joe Girardi said.

Should Curtis Granderson have bunted in the ninth inning? I don’t know. Maybe. But I don’t mind playing for the win in that spot rather than playing to move the tying run station-to-station, and Granderson did hit the ball pretty hard. I guess you can say swinging away was the wrong choice because the Yankees lost the game, but I can’t say bunting would have changed the final result.

It really was just weird night. This is what it looked like.

Yankees Royals Baseball

Yankees Royals Baseball

Associated Press photos

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98 Responses to “Kind of a weird night”

  1. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 9:07 am

    Chad-

    Yes. very wierd. Good thing the pros don’t play with metal bats.;)

  2. Bret The Hitman August 14th, 2010 at 9:11 am

    MTU,

    Is the Native American Hopi or Zuni?

    That’s a wild pic!

    I saved it to my laptop.

    It’s gorgeous.

    It looks like a woman but hard to tell since the person looks 115 years old.

    What an amazing culture – far more healthy than we give them credit for being. Their life spans were much longer than recorded. The documentation on their health is shoddy and blurred by eurocentric biases.

  3. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 9:12 am

    Bret-

    I responded in the previous thread. :)

  4. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 9:16 am

    Bret-

    I have seen things anyone should feel priviledged and humbled to see. I consider myself very fortunate. And I try to share my joy and
    appreciation of same. :)

  5. 108 stitches August 14th, 2010 at 9:26 am

    Fortunately no blood with the teams below losing also. A wierd game for the Yankees that could have been won.
    With all due respect to Robby Cano, if the vote was today, Josh Hamilton would be the MVP. He’s an amazing player loaded with talent.

  6. Bret The Hitman August 14th, 2010 at 9:27 am

    MTU,

    It’s really fascinating.

    We have forgotten our roots as a species.

    Their prophecies predict that we will return to that lifestyle because the natural order calls for us to live in harmony with Earth and all of nature.

    We are a pretty sick society.

    2/3 of us are obese.

    Chronic diseases are on the rise – ADD, ADHD, Autism, Bipolar, Depression, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Cancer, Diabetes.

    There are some scientists who believe that our modern lifestyle with all the toxins in food, water and air have caused irreversible damage to our genes. Some predict that soaring infertility rates are attributable to our unhealthy habits and that family lines will end. People in poor health today, might be able to reproduce but their children who inherit their genes might not. Some family lines are thought to have only 1 or 2 more generations of reproduction.

    These scientists believe that infertility will cause mass extinctions – not nuclear bombs.

    I have a wild theory that the domestication of animals and the farming practices of the Mayans over the centuries damaged their gene pools and led to the eventual and gradual demise of their family lines. Aliens didn’t kill off the Mayans. A meteor didn’t do it. Why did they disappear? Their genes were too damaged by distorting nature. Gene mutations destroyed the Mayans and they lost the ability to have children.

  7. Bronx Jeers August 14th, 2010 at 9:33 am

    MTU,

    Awesome pics.

    And one of the things I find so fascinating about Ecuador (and I guess much of South America in general) is that they’re much more attuned to their native culture. There’s still about 2 million people in Ecuador that speak Qhechuan which is sort of the Incan language.

  8. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 9:33 am

    Bret-

    That’s an interesting theory on the Maya.

    My own personal take is that Climate change and wars destroyed their culture but what you mentioned certainly could have contributed to their demise. 2 years ago I visited their 2 biggest cities.

    Tikal and Caracol. It was beyond magnificent. It fulfilled a dream for me. :)

  9. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 9:36 am

    Bronx-

    You really don’t want to get me started on this. It has been a lifelong
    fascination. I have visited numerous Meso- American sites, and loved every minute of it.

    I have not visited the crown jewel yet but hope to before I close my eyes.

    Is your wife from Ecuador ?

  10. Bret The Hitman August 14th, 2010 at 9:48 am

    MTU,

    I believe our genetic code is highly adaptable to natural climate changes. I look at the Inuit and how they can survive generations upon generations of inhospitable climate. They are an ancient culture, highly adapted to extreme climate. That adaptation is in the human genome.

    On the flip side, I believe the most drastic unnatural change in Maya history was their shift from being a hunter-gatherer tribe to an agricultural, sedentary one.

    The spread of diseases in animal populations is more rapid in closed quarters where they are being raised by humans instead of navigating through their lives in the wild.

    Centuries of mass consumption of diseased animals and diseased crops can take a serious toll on the genes. The food is edible and doesn’t kill on the spot but it kills the strength of human groups and their capacity to further adapt to the natural order.

  11. Bronx Jeers August 14th, 2010 at 9:50 am

    Machu Picchu?

    Yes, my wife is from Guayaquil and we go down there once or twice a year. I’m actually traveling there next week.

  12. Bret The Hitman August 14th, 2010 at 9:51 am

    Furthermore, a lack of biodiversity in the diet is also linked to DNA damage since our bodies depend on the phytochemicals and antioxidants in diverse species of plant life.

  13. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 9:56 am

    Jeers-

    Yes MP. I have visited SA. Looking forward to going back.

    Have a great time. Take pics. :)

    Bret-

    You’re theories are interesting but I have no way of knowing if they are true. Much more controlled research on the relationship of nutrition and genetic expression is needed.

  14. pat August 14th, 2010 at 9:58 am

    I fell asleep so I didn’t see the 9th but I’m okay with playing for the win on the road especially after 2.5 hours of rain delays with an older team who had just played 4 games in 100 degree temps and it’s now 2 am. All or nothing at that point.

    stuart a is from LA? Talk about smashing the laidback go with the flow stereotype.

  15. Bronx Jeers August 14th, 2010 at 10:01 am

    On the flip side, I believe the most drastic unnatural change in Maya history was their shift from being a hunter-gatherer tribe to an agricultural, sedentary one.

    ——————————————————————————————————————————————–

    Interesting stuff Bret but if true, would it not imply that there was a genetic defect present in the first place. Things worked out pretty well in the fertile crescent no?

  16. Bret The Hitman August 14th, 2010 at 10:02 am

    MTU,

    We’re running out of time I’m afraid.

    Sedentary life survives on the strength of centuries of subsistence on nutrient deficient diets. Without continued mass consumption of the vast array of nutrients and antioxidants plentiful in the wild, we are feeding our depleting our genes of vital resources required for sustainable adaptations.

    Without nutrients, we are malnourished, our genes die, our bodies follow.

    I highly doubt I’m the only person in the world that has applied the theory of “genetic integrity” to the sudden disappearance of the Maya.

    If I ever pursue a PHD in Dietetics, I might consider popularizing that theory.

    First things first though, gotta get my RD ;)

    So how is your Hyman diet making you feel?

    I have my mom on it and she said she’s regained energy levels of 5 years ago.

  17. Ace August 14th, 2010 at 10:07 am

    Anyway u can have an off topic forum Chad? Because these people really ruin the baseball flow

  18. Crawdaddy August 14th, 2010 at 10:08 am

    To get back on a Yankee-related topic, the Yankees signed their 9th pick Morton for 450K. This is one pitching prospect I’ll be tracking in the coming years.

    http://www.baseballamerica.com/blog/draft/?p=2752

  19. SJ44 August 14th, 2010 at 10:09 am

    Pat,

    LOL.

    Last night was a no blood spilled night. Such is the advantage of the team being chased instead of chasing other teams.

  20. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 10:10 am

    Bret-

    The hyman diet had a very similar effect on me. I started out fit and it just made me stronger and even more energetic.

    It was beneficial IMO. :)

  21. Bret The Hitman August 14th, 2010 at 10:13 am

    Bronx Jeers August 14th, 2010 at 10:01 am
    On the flip side, I believe the most drastic unnatural change in Maya history was their shift from being a hunter-gatherer tribe to an agricultural, sedentary one.

    ——————————————————————————————————————————————–

    Interesting stuff Bret but if true, would it not imply that there was a genetic defect present in the first place. Things worked out pretty well in the fertile crescent no?

    ****************

    That’s true to a certain extent.

    However, it’s easily explained by genetic variations between groups born of different geographic locations. Some groups can sustain civilization longer than others.

    Why is this?

    While we share as a species so much in common in our genetic code, there are drastic variations within group populations, family lines and individuals.

    I suspect there’s an hour glass of time for each group throughout history, and the ability to further reproduce or perpetuate that group is/has been diminished or enhanced dependent on the interaction between each unique gene pool for each group and that group’s eating habits and nutritional outcomes.

    I suspect that the more we try to control nature rather than live in its ordered path, the more damage we do to our genetic code and the more we fall out of nature’s grace over generations of time. When we control nature, we lose nutrients that fuel our genes. We lose diversity and therefore, healing medicine in food.

    The hour glass of time for the group of humans subsisting on the American diet is pouring sand a rate faster than that of the inhabitants of the fertile crescent and even more rapidly than the Maya.

  22. SJ44 August 14th, 2010 at 10:14 am

    Something that has gone unreported…..

    Almost every Yankee draft pick that has signed, with the exception of Culver, have signed over slot deals. Some well overslot.

    For those worried about Hal not spending money…

    Those worries appear to be unfounded.

  23. Tom in N.J. August 14th, 2010 at 10:17 am

    Here’s a list of Yankees draft picks who have signed:

    http://www.baseballamerica.com.....?team=1028

  24. Bronx Jeers August 14th, 2010 at 10:32 am

    Bret,

    It’s been a while since World Civ. but IIRC the Mayans went out pretty quickly. Something interesting to look may be the parallels at what they did with corn and what we’re currently doing with it.

  25. Doreen August 14th, 2010 at 10:40 am

    Bret -

    You have obviously done a lot of thinking and studying on this subject.

    It’s still so random, though.

    You mention the increase in chronic diseases and talk mention autism as one of those. One of my daughters has autism, the other has learning disabilities. None of my nieces or nephews is afflicted in any way. Of ALL my siblings, I have taken the best care of my physical self throughout my life – not smoking, no drugs and minimal alcohol intake; eating as little processed food as is possible to do in America. I started reading labels a long time ago.

    I find it difficult to accept at times that in spite of having done most things right, my children have been affected. When you speak in general terms, about the general population, all that stuff sounds reasonable and as good an explanation as there can be. But when you get down to specific people, there’s still questions and a random nature to all of it.

  26. Tom in N.J. August 14th, 2010 at 10:43 am

    The mayan people never disappeared. The centralized goverment collapsed and the civilization branched off into multiple city states.

  27. Bronx Jeers August 14th, 2010 at 10:51 am

    Good point Tom. It’s not like they went extinct like the Neanderthals.

    Actually, I have a theory that Neanderthals survived in small pockets and still walk among us today. Take Johnny Damon for example…

  28. Bret The Hitman August 14th, 2010 at 10:56 am

    Doreen,

    You can’t view your daughter’s condition in isolation. There are many environmental factors in play outside of just prenatal nutrition.

    Immunization shots. Doctors pushed them. Many still do. There are so many hazardous substances in them, but exposing the ingredients is difficult in light of the pharmaceutical companies profiting from their production.

    We live in a culture where it was once legal to put lead in paint and lead in gasoline. Dental fillings contained high doses of mercury. There are toxic metals in our drinking water, petrochemicals in our bottled water.

    Coal burning energy plants emitting toxic metals like mercury into the air we breath. It is the main way we produce electricity in the US.

    Also, the genetic integrity of your eggs are partially determined by your mother’s involuntary exposure to toxins and her diet which might have been high in some of the foods that doctors advise autistic people to avoid – bread and milk – gluten and casein.

    The genes in your children are also a combination of yours and your husband’s, so his diet before pregnancy comes into play.

  29. Bret The Hitman August 14th, 2010 at 10:59 am

    Bronx Jeers,

    Corn is one of the main culprits, I suspect.

    It’s very difficult to digest and therefore seriously compromises immune function since the gut and the immune system are located so close to one another in the human body.

    If you start altering it from it’s natural form and processing it in any way, the ramifications and damage become even more severe.

    High Fructose Corn Syrup causes unprecedented damage to DNA.

  30. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 10:59 am

    Tom-

    People tend to think of many things in our world as “static” and “linear” in nature when in there is much evidence to suggest the contrary, i.e. Dynamic and non-linear.

    For a long time the accepted POV in Evolutionary theory was that it was orderly and linear in it’s development with long periods of time being the critical determinant in change.

    A discovery by Walter Alvarez some years ago changed all that with the insight of geological “castrophism” and it’s connection with “non-linear” forces.

    The same sorts of theories can be applied to cultural evolution in the sense that sudden and rapid shifts in climate can lead to declination and/or destructions of human civilizations which are unable to adapt to those relatively rapid changes.

    It is now widely known that the climate shifted dramatically about 1000 years ago entering a much hotter and drier period.

    Very true in the American SW. I think this may have disrupted the Maya and the Anasazi more than anything other factor.

    The carrying capacity of the land fell off a cliff.

    My apologies for the long post. It is a favorite subject of mine.

  31. ZachA August 14th, 2010 at 11:07 am

    On an off topic note here… Jonathon Broxton had his closer role taken away by manager Joe Torre. It’s funny because all the preseason rankings (FOX, ESPN, Yahoo) had him as the best closer in baseball- right in front of Mo. Now I guess he’ll become Kuo’s setup guy.

  32. GreenBeret7 August 14th, 2010 at 11:11 am

    Oh, God. I’m going to die. I just ate a bag of Orville Redenbacher’s Buttered Popcorn and drank a can of Coca-Cola. I knew I should have switched to Showtime Unbuttered Popcorn and Pepsi, but, I’m addicted.

  33. Bronx Jeers August 14th, 2010 at 11:13 am

    I theorize that sudden climate change may have had an adverse effect on the Yankee “culture-of-RISP”

  34. sunny615 August 14th, 2010 at 11:14 am

    It was basically a wasted opportunity to gain one ground on the chasers by beating on one of the cellar dwellers of the league. These games are opportune times to gain some ground on these teams and with a prime opportunity last night, the Yankees did not take advantage in a very winnable game against a very shoddy team and bullpen. Weird night definitely, but still a missed opportunity to move forward.

  35. sunny615 August 14th, 2010 at 11:15 am

    Was it movie butter or reduced fat butter?

  36. Tom in N.J. August 14th, 2010 at 11:16 am

    MTU, it is a very, very interesting topic. I, admittedly, know little about meteorological history and the changes it can cause civilizations to go through. I have read about the Medieval Warm Period and the subsequent Little Ice Age that followed. And I have little doubt that climate change cand bring cataclysmic changes to a civilization.

  37. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:16 am

    GB-

    The popcorn’s fine.

    Just lighten up a little on the beer and pizza. :)

  38. BIG AL August 14th, 2010 at 11:17 am

    WOW – I’ll need an encyclopedia to follow these posts.

    MTU – You appear to be a professor in the studies of ancient live styles.

    Me, I’m sticking to baseball before I get in over my head.

    Very interesting theory’s as to the demise of the Mayan, although that’s all we have, as with most prior history studies, is theory.

  39. GreenBeret7 August 14th, 2010 at 11:19 am

    All I care about is that the Yankees win the next 3 WS titles so nobody can ever take the title from them when the world as we know it ends on 21 December 2012.

  40. BIG AL August 14th, 2010 at 11:20 am

    ZachA August 14th, 2010 at 11:07 am
    On an off topic note here… Jonathon Broxton had his closer role taken away by manager Joe Torre. It’s funny because all the preseason rankings (FOX, ESPN, Yahoo) had him as the best closer in baseball- right in front of Mo. Now I guess he’ll become Kuo’s setup guy.

    ……………………………………………………………………

    No surprise, Torre ruins yet another pitcher.

  41. BIG AL August 14th, 2010 at 11:21 am

    Funny isn’t it, the Mayan couldn’t even live long enough to see the end of their own calender.

  42. Joe from Long Island August 14th, 2010 at 11:22 am

    Absolutely, Bret. Immunizations are a blight on modern society. How am I going to retire in a style to which I want to become accustomed to if kids don’t get diseases like the good ole days.

    I haven’t seen a good case of meningitis in over a year. Boy, with the seizures, brain infarcts, having to go on a mechanical respirator in order to breathe…. Boy, did she generate a lot of charges!

    Polio, smallpox, dipththeria, epiglottitis, RSV bronchiolitis…. The list of diseases that used to kill off the little tykes, but only after days and sometimes weeks of suffering…. Man, bring back the good ole days! I could have really cleaned up then!

    And, now they’ve got an immunization against human papilloma virus, that causes cervical cancer. How are the oncologists and gyne surgeons continue to make a living.

    And, don’t forget, we should go back to the farming practices of the 18th century. So what if there’s much less food, and it’s a lot more expensive, so only those with a lot of money can afford to eat. Survival of the fittest, after all.

    Ah, the good ole days.

    Bret, I really don’t mean to dump on you, you seem like a decent enough sort, but this is particular area is a raw spot with me. I agree with you about diet and sedentary lifestyle, but not this.

  43. GreenBeret7 August 14th, 2010 at 11:23 am

    MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:16 am
    GB-

    The popcorn’s fine.

    Just lighten up a little on the beer and pizza.

    ———————————————————————————————————————-

    Maybe I shouldn’t have eaten the paper bag as an extra snack. The dyes in it will probably destroy my jeans. They’ve been getting a little tight as it is.

  44. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:25 am

    Tom-

    Absolutely. We see lot’s of evidence for it out here.

    Two great books on the subject are Earth in Upheaval, and Worlds in Collision. Classics.

    I’m sure Walter Alvarez must have put a good book out on his theories as well.

    What was once considered heresy is now gaining acceptance.

    The Earth is “alive” in the sense that it is not a static system.

    Varaitions in solar output, regular perturbations in the earth’s orbits(Melancovich cycles) have a great deal more to do with climate change than we humans do IMO.

    When the next large Meteor or Comet strikes the Earth, or the next SuperVolcano goes off we’ll realize 2 things.

    How lucky we are to be somewhere else.

    And how little what humans actually do determines the actual fate of the Earth.

    The other forces account for a great deal more of the variance.

    Build your escape pod NOW ! :)

  45. Doreen August 14th, 2010 at 11:25 am

    Bret -

    Oh, I understand all that. But my sister and brother had the same parents; our families grew up in the same environmental stew; I find it incredibly upsetting that of all the grandchildren in BOTH our families, only ours have ANY problems like the ones my children have.

    As far as the immunizations go, at the time (20! years ago), there was no question that you got your children immunized, with no thought, really – 100% recommendation. Every child in both our families was immunized. No other children in either of our families was affected. I am ready to agree that there may be a predisposition that our children had that the others didn’t (after all, I am the only one who married him and he is the only one that married me), but I am not ready to say wholesale that immunizations are to blame.

    It’s just random.

    And not only that, if there was this predisposition genetically that my children had, it stinks that nothing I did in my pregnancy or before or after, nothing I did or continue to do in preparing healthy foods for my children, nothing would have or will help them. And I have my moments where I am extremely bitter about the randomness of life.

    Autism is a very cruel condition. And while the current publicity sure has helped, it doesn’t even scratch the surface of what the severity of the condition can be, or the changing nature of it over the years can be. We are, instead treated to the “high functioning” individuals with Asperger’s who represent a fraction of the autism population. We are treated to the Jenny McCarthy’s who say their children are “cured” of autism. We only want to hear “happy, peppy” stories about how with the right therapies autistic children can function in society. I could go on and on but the bitterness is coming out now, and I’m off topic (off the off-topic topic!).

    Anyway, I guess what I’m saying is that even if the general condition of the human population can be summed up to nutrition affecting the gene pool, the affects are still very random.

  46. Bret The Hitman August 14th, 2010 at 11:29 am

    Joe,

    I hope you don’t feel I’m suggesting Doctors are consciously trying to cause harm. I

    On the contrary.

    I would say the corporate interests who wrote med school textbooks, trained fleets of doctors and published misleading articles in medical journals are behind it all.

    Here are some of the harmful ingredients in vaccines:

    Vaccines contain many ingredients of which the public is not aware. These are just some of the ingredients used to make a vaccine:

    * Ethylene glycol – antifreeze
    * Phenol – also known as carbolic acid. This is used as a disinfectant, dye.
    * Formaldehyde – a known cancer causing agent
    *Aluminum – which is associated with Alzheimer’s disease and seizures also cancer producing in laboratory mice. It is used as an additive to promote antibody response.
    * Thimerosal – a mercury disinfectant/ preservative. It can result in brain injury and autoimmune disease.
    * Neomycin, Streptomycin – antibiotics which have caused allergic reaction in some people.

    http://homefirst.com/info-1/va.....eness.html

  47. Bronx Jeers August 14th, 2010 at 11:29 am

    Over the last 3 years Broxton has thrown 14 more innings than Mariano. That’s 4 and 2/3 additional innings per season.

    And Broxton’s about 15 years younger.

    Why is it always Torre’s fault?

  48. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:29 am

    Al-

    Some of my favorite subjects. I could post some photos as evidence
    what I was referring to about the Dynamic nature of Earth’s forces.

    In my hikes I regularly see such evidence. You just have to look.

    GB-

    Switch your genes on and go to the Wranglers. :)

  49. BIG AL August 14th, 2010 at 11:30 am

    Time to re-visit building those bomb shelters, like we had in the 50′s and 60′s.

    When the sun explodes, or a large meteor hits, we may still have a chance of survival.

    If we all die, who gets the insurance?

  50. Tom in N.J. August 14th, 2010 at 11:32 am

    Bret, are you a Dr.?

  51. GreenBeret7 August 14th, 2010 at 11:32 am

    I suppose if you inject laboratory mice with 30 times the recommended amount of licorice, it’s likely to give the mice cancer, too.

  52. GreenBeret7 August 14th, 2010 at 11:34 am

    Tom in N.J. August 14th, 2010 at 11:32 am
    Bret, are you a Dr.?

    ———————————————————————————————————————-

    No, but he stayed at a Motel 6 last night.

  53. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:34 am

    AL-

    The last mouse or cockroach that can read. :)

  54. BIG AL August 14th, 2010 at 11:34 am

    “Why is it always Torre’s fault?”

    Because he over uses his pitchers, and burns their arms out. He did it when managing the Yankees, and he’s done it to Broxton.
    Example, remember when the Yankees played LA and Broxton came in to pitch? He’s been doing that all season. Torre is a terrible manager when it comes to using his pitchers.

  55. Tom in N.J. August 14th, 2010 at 11:34 am

    MMMMMM…licorice flavored mice. My cat would be so happy.

  56. SJ44 August 14th, 2010 at 11:35 am

    The Yankees didn’t lose anything last night.

    The teams trailing them lost an opportunity to gain on them.

    That’s how you view things at this point in the season.

    Everytime a team trailing the Yankees lose a chance to gain on them and lose a game off the schedule, they and not the Yankees, are the evenings’ losers.

  57. GreenBeret7 August 14th, 2010 at 11:36 am

    MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:29 am
    Al-

    Some of my favorite subjects. I could post some photos as evidence
    what I was referring to about the Dynamic nature of Earth’s forces.

    In my hikes I regularly see such evidence. You just have to look.

    GB-

    Switch your genes on and go to the Wranglers.

    ———————————————————————————————————————-

    I’d rather have wrangled with Ann-Margret’s jeans (and genes).

  58. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:36 am

    GB-

    I think the mouse would turn black.

  59. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:37 am

    GB-

    Put in a request when you get to the other side.

  60. Tom in N.J. August 14th, 2010 at 11:37 am

    MTU, GB buys his genes at OLD NAVY…

  61. Bret The Hitman August 14th, 2010 at 11:37 am

    Doreen,

    It’s not random.

    Our damaged DNA is a culmination of harm born of our group’s/culture’s manipulation of nature. We have created these toxins together. We have endured a nutrient deficient diet together, over centuries, even thousands of years. We have lacked biodiversity and adequate levels of antioxidants for an equal amount of time.

    As for your offspring, they will combine their genetic code with that of another family. Strengths and weaknesses intermingle.

    The problem is the majority of Americans are mating within the same larger cultural group.

    It’s just a matter of time before our culture’s poor adaptation to nature will damage our civilization as a whole, on a wide-spread and perhaps catastrophic scale.

  62. BIG AL August 14th, 2010 at 11:38 am

    MTU -

    Remember after they exploded the bombs on Christmas Island, we were told nothing could live there for over 20 years. When they visited the island, the insects were doing just fine. The insect world has the greatest ability to adapt to all, and any, changes in their environment.

  63. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:38 am

    Tom-

    Or the “Gap” :)

  64. BronxBorn August 14th, 2010 at 11:39 am

    Joe, we are coming up to NY and Long Island next week. Is there a cool minor league stadium on the island. I just want to take my pop to a ball game and he is getting on in years so want somewhere on the Island if possible. Any suggestions?

  65. GreenBeret7 August 14th, 2010 at 11:39 am

    Tom in N.J. August 14th, 2010 at 11:37 am
    MTU, GB buys his genes at OLD NAVY…

    ———————————————————————————————————————-

    Not a chance. It’s either OLD ARMY or nothing. I obviously have nothing to wear.

  66. BIG AL August 14th, 2010 at 11:40 am

    Elvis did!

  67. Bronx Jeers August 14th, 2010 at 11:40 am

    Watching “Man vs Food” in Kansas City. Lot’s of great food in NYC but BBQ? Real BBQ?

    Oh the brisket I just witnessed…. Gotta go to KC.

  68. hardwired7 August 14th, 2010 at 11:40 am

    Chad Jennings August 14th, 2010 at 4:05 am

    ———————————–

    posting @4:05 am Eastern?

    you’re a wild man, Chad, and that’s one of the reasons why this blog kicks ass.

  69. BIG AL August 14th, 2010 at 11:40 am

    The older you get, it’s more like Salvation Army.

  70. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:41 am

    Al-

    Imagine that. A world populated by Cockroaches.

    If you work for Orkin or Black Flag you’ll make a mint.

    Me. I just like the crunchy sound they make under my boot. :)

  71. GreenBeret7 August 14th, 2010 at 11:42 am

    MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:38 am
    Tom-

    Or the “Gap”

    ———————————————————————————————————————-

    You’re not paying attention. My problem is that the GAP is getting smaller.

  72. Tom in N.J. August 14th, 2010 at 11:42 am

    Oh dear GB, I hope you have a set of old BDUs…

  73. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:42 am

    GB-

    Was that nothing to wear or nothing to fear. ;)

  74. GreenBeret7 August 14th, 2010 at 11:44 am

    BronxBorn August 14th, 2010 at 11:39 am
    Joe, we are coming up to NY and Long Island next week. Is there a cool minor league stadium on the island. I just want to take my pop to a ball game and he is getting on in years so want somewhere on the Island if possible. Any suggestions?

    ———————————————————————————————————————-

    The Staten Island Yankees, Bronx. Yanks Rookie level team.

  75. Joe from Long Island August 14th, 2010 at 11:44 am

    Bret, I believe you have the purest intentions.

    But, the vast majority of medical research published is not funded by the medical-industrial complex. In fact, I know a lot of MDs who have published medical research, and they’re the exact guys you would want as your doctor. Not one of them take industry money. Now, some do, and sell their soles a bit. No argument there – mostly medical device stuff. Happens in every line of work/profession.

    As far as added ingredients – the big one of the moment is thimerosal, the mercury derivative that was named as causing autism.

    Well, numerous studies, not only in this country, but in northern Europe, looking at tens of thousands kids, failed to show any association of autism spectrum with thimerosal. And, where thimerosal was banned years ago, it was found that the rates of autism actually increased. Increased! So, that seems pretty clear cut to me.

    You are correct in saying that one must be aware of the source of certain items. That’s only prudent. But it cuts both ways. There are too many people on the other side – what we used to call authoritarians on the left – who have an agenda to push as well.

    We had a kid 1-2 years ago. Parents refused all immunizations, ’cause, that’s how doctors cause cancer and all… The kid came down with influenza, and had encephalitis, a rare but dangerous complication of the disease. Kid’s now vegetative. Normal little boy before the flu. Now, vegetative, and his parents divorced, all because of something that was totally preventable.

  76. mick August 14th, 2010 at 11:44 am

    4 August 14th, 2010 at 11:35 am

    The Yankees didn’t lose anything last night.

    The teams trailing them lost an opportunity to gain on them.

    That’s how you view things at this point in the season.

    Everytime a team trailing the Yankees lose a chance to gain on them and lose a game off the schedule, they and not the Yankees, are the evenings’ losers.
    =========================================
    SJ-Your post seems trite compared to all the meaningful crap thrown around here this fine AM, no offense to anyone.

  77. BronxBorn August 14th, 2010 at 11:45 am

    MTU those photos were so great especially of the Navajo Queen… she is Navajo, right?

  78. BIG AL August 14th, 2010 at 11:45 am

    MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:41 am
    Al-

    Imagine that. A world populated by Cockroaches.

    If you work for Orkin or Black Flag you’ll make a mint.

    Me. I just like the crunchy sound they make under my boot.

    …………………………………………………………………

    Just the thought makes me feel uncomfortable. Don’t like bugs, other than dead ones. As look as they stay outside where they belong. I don’t live in their world, don’t want them living in mine.

  79. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:46 am

    Joe-

    ” Now, some do, and sell their soles a bit. ”

    How much money do they get for their shoes Joe ?

    I might wanna give it a try. :)

  80. mick August 14th, 2010 at 11:47 am

    ronxBorn August 14th, 2010 at 11:39 am

    Joe, we are coming up to NY and Long Island next week. Is there a cool minor league stadium on the island. I just want to take my pop to a ball game and he is getting on in years so want somewhere on the Island if possible. Any suggestions?
    =====================================
    You can also check out the Long Island Ducks, I believe in Commack, LI.
    Some ex-major leaguers could be playing, also a safer neighborhood.

  81. BronxBorn August 14th, 2010 at 11:47 am

    Thanks GB. I was hoping for something a little closer – on Long Island… Don’t really care about affiliation, just about going to a game with my dad.

  82. JM August 14th, 2010 at 11:47 am

    #MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:41 am
    Al-

    Imagine that. A world populated by Cockroaches.

    If you work for Orkin or Black Flag you?ll make a mint.

    Me. I just like the crunchy sound they make under my boot.

    _______________________________________

    Are you a fan of the movie “Men in Black”? :)

  83. BronxBorn August 14th, 2010 at 11:47 am

    that sounds great mick, thank you…

  84. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:49 am

    BronxBorn-

    Yes. A very nice Navajo Lady with an amazing sense of humor considering she is over 90.

    She’s as cool as cool can be. :)

  85. BIG AL August 14th, 2010 at 11:49 am

    MTU -

    Just went back to look at the pictures – Great stuff!

  86. Bronx Jeers August 14th, 2010 at 11:50 am

    BronxBorn

    The Brooklyn Cyclones are probably the closest minor league team to LI. The Mets single A

    There’s also The L I Ducks which is an independent team? I believe they play in Islip.

  87. DYD INDA WUL August 14th, 2010 at 11:51 am

    # Tom in N.J. August 14th, 2010 at 10:43 am

    The mayan people never disappeared. The centralized goverment collapsed and the civilization branched off into multiple city states.
    ________________________________________________

    Refreshing to hear such a sublime understanding. The proof of the theory that the Maya died off, were eradicated, etc. is ultimately that archaeologists could not find grave sites near their great cities.

    The assumption that because no sites were found meant that the people simply died off presumes that the people actually lived in these cities.

    What was amazing about the Maya is that they developed an astronomical system that rivaled those of other great civilizations, built great cities and structures, yet did not use such knowledge for commercial ends as dis many of those civilizations that perpetuated themselves into the present.

    The Maya built great city-centers as places to gather, to learn to worship. They, however, lived humbly in the countryside, using their advanced understanding of cosmic–time to aid them in the simple matter of farming. In contrast certain civilizations that passed on their homes, structures built to endure, to their offspring, the Maya believed their spirit, not their physical bodies were eternal; there are therefore no ruins as in Greece, Italy, Spain, etc. for that matter to show that they ever lived.

    In a word, they did not cash in on their wisdom. You are right: the Maya did not go anywhere.

    To say that the Maya were eradicated because their cities are desolate, is like saying there are no Yankee fans, because the stadium is empty. Something like that. :-)

  88. Joe from Long Island August 14th, 2010 at 11:51 am

    Bronx Born – As GB states, above, the Staten Island Yankees are one option. My stepson has gone to a few games there over the years, and seems to like it.

    Another option, here on the Island, are the independent Atlantic League Long Island Ducks, in Suffolk. I’ve been to a few of their games, over time, and it’s a nice evening. Free parking, lower-priced concessions, beer, hot dogs. They really stress a nice, family-oriented night at the ballpark, and they do a good job of it.

  89. GreenBeret7 August 14th, 2010 at 11:52 am

    BronxBorn August 14th, 2010 at 11:47 am
    Thanks GB. I was hoping for something a little closer – on Long Island… Don’t really care about affiliation, just about going to a game with my dad.

    ———————————————————————————————————————-

    You gotta admit that Staten Island is closer than Tampa. I really had no idea of the distance from Long Island to Staten Island, Bronx.

  90. BIG AL August 14th, 2010 at 11:52 am

    GB – If your that close, take him to YS.

  91. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:53 am

    JM-

    WAD.

    I like the critters that live in that locker. Too cool.

    No doubt that there are aliens amongst us.

    And ones from outer space too. ;)

  92. GreenBeret7 August 14th, 2010 at 11:55 am

    Joe from Long Island August 14th, 2010 at 11:51 am
    Bronx Born – As GB states, above, the Staten Island Yankees are one option. My stepson has gone to a few games there over the years, and seems to like it.

    Another option, here on the Island, are the independent Atlantic League Long Island Ducks, in Suffolk. I’ve been to a few of their games, over time, and it’s a nice evening. Free parking, lower-priced concessions, beer, hot dogs. They really stress a nice, family-oriented night at the ballpark, and they do a good job of it.

    ———————————————————————————————————————-

    My God, man!!! Haven’t you been reading on here what things like hot dogs, pop corn and beer can do to your genes (and jeans)?

    Morning, Joe. Hope Mrs Joe enjoyed the dinner when she got home.

  93. MTU August 14th, 2010 at 11:57 am

    Al-

    I’ll post some interesting and beautiful Geology pics which reflect catastrophic change sometime soon. If I forget and you wish to see them just remind me. :)

  94. Bret The Hitman August 14th, 2010 at 11:57 am

    Joe,

    There problem with the current status quo in medical publications is that the influence of a handful of purist, MD’s like you mention, lack the organization, financial means and communication apparatus to spread their scientific knowledge.

    Most of the information infiltrating the medical community comes from the powerful, influential source that is the medical-industrial complex.

    That is how lead got in paint, despite the dispute of a handful of medical dissenters.

    That is how lead found its way to the fuel pump.

    Why immunization shots contain a derivative of a toxic metal and selective research nevertheless supports its ongoing inclusion in inoculations.

    On the nutrition end of things, the food-industrial complex basically rewrote the Food Pyramid to promote consumption of taxpayer subsidized wheat (gluten) and milk (casein). Food manufacturers, including junk food manufacturers are given 15 billion dollars per year.

    Do you want to know how much of our tax money supports the growing of healthy foods on small scale organic farms?

    None.

    How about large scale producers of fruits and vegetables, known anti-cancer foods?

    Zero.

    Our health is largely controlled by industry and industry is clearly misusing the Earth, abusing the health of its citizens and profiting from it.

  95. BronxBorn August 14th, 2010 at 12:02 pm

    Thank guys for the input.. the Ducks sound ideal for the fam… preciate it greatly.

  96. BronxBorn August 14th, 2010 at 12:03 pm

    Bret – I tend to agree with you.

  97. Doreen August 14th, 2010 at 12:06 pm

    Long Island Ducks are in Central Islip, Long Island.

  98. BronxBorn August 14th, 2010 at 12:29 pm

    Thanks Doreen am visiting their web site. Its funny when I was growing up, there was a hockey team on the Island called the Long Island Ducks…

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