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A New York Yankees blog by Chad Jennings and the staff of The Journal News


Girardi: “We knew the expectations weren’t going to change”

Posted by: Chad Jennings - Posted in Misc on Feb 22, 2011 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

From the moment it started, this whole Hank vs. Derek controversy had a shelf life of 48 hours at most.

This afternoon, Hank Steinbrenner said his “mansions” comment was never directed at Derek Jeter, and maybe that’s true. Steinbrenner might have used the word “mansions” same way the political strategist in the West Wing intended to use the phrase “bigger swimming pools and faster private jets,” as a catchall image of luxury and satisfaction. Whatever the intention, calling out Jeter’s competitiveness was always going to be dismissed in an instant.

It was a joke before it was a story.

The bigger issue is the one that stretched beyond Jeter to the other players and coaches in the Yankees clubhouse. It’s the issue Steinbrenner didn’t take back when he once again addressed the media this afternoon, saying the Yankees inability to win last season was at least partially the result of some players being “a little complacent.”

This was Joe Girardi’s response:

I think Hank is expressing his frustration. The same frustration we all had last year, that we didn’t accomplish what we wanted to. He’s the owner of the club. You may have seen a lot of us right after the (final) game or the day after, cleaning out our lockers. Maybe some of you didn’t see Hank. We were frustrated. I was not happy about the way we played, the players were not happy with the way we played.

We won 95 games last year and swept though that first round, won the first game (of the ALCS) and then didn’t play well against Texas. What you want to attribute that to? There are a lot of reasons: We didn’t necessarily hit, and we didn’t necessarily pitch. That’s a bad combination when you get into a series. Our guys are working hard, and we know what our goal is.

When Mr. Steinbrenner passed away, we knew the expectations weren’t going to change.

By the way, if you couldn’t tell, this was the first really absurd day we had out here. It was a day that started with Jeter actively discussing whether or not a word was or was not plural — mansion or mansions? — and whether that meant he was or was not being called out by one of the Yankees owners. It was a day that ended with Girardi basically being asked whether it was true that his team simply didn’t try hard enough to win those last two games that would have gotten them to the World Series last season. Just a weird, goofy day.

Associated Press photos

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155 Responses to “Girardi: “We knew the expectations weren’t going to change””

  1. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 22nd, 2011 at 6:59 pm

    I agree that this shelf life will be short indeed.

    ***************

    If you close that picture of Ruffing you will see a team shot of our 1941 Yankees.

  2. m February 22nd, 2011 at 7:09 pm

    It was a weird, goofy day trying to untangle the weird, goofy quote from Hank.

  3. LGY February 22nd, 2011 at 7:15 pm

    trisha,

    Is there a level playing field in this QOTD thing?

    Is consulting outside resources allowed? Does GB get handicapped for being like 100 years old and having the fortune to see all these players? What about time zone problems. What if our friends on the West Coast are not awake for the morning question? Or the younger generation on this board who may have had a long night and not awake for it?

    So many questions to answer!

  4. GreenBeret7 February 22nd, 2011 at 7:20 pm

    Trisha, thanks for your little trivia contest and great photos. It really gives a break from some of the silly aeguments

  5. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 22nd, 2011 at 7:28 pm

    GB I’m so happy you like it. It makes me so happy and proud and excited to be doing this because I am also being able to pay homage and reverence to these men who are as much a part of the Yankees as are today’s players and who were such a vibrant and exciting part of the game when they played.

    I just hope others get as much pleasure out of connecting, names, faces, and background,

    Thanks for the support.

    :)

  6. West Coast Yankee Fan February 22nd, 2011 at 7:31 pm

    Well Joe Girardi how about look inwards to your abysmal managing in game 4 against Texas?

    Five innings wasn’t enough to get from A.J. Burnett, so with a 3-2 lead you insanely leave A.J. in after Guerrero leads off the sixth with a base hit. Then man on second with two out and a base clear you put the go-ahead run on base??? Why? Oh yeah your binder. Guess you didn’t listen to your little league coach, you know that silly winning run on base thingy. We all remember what happened next…Babe Molina.

    Uggh. Bad memory.

  7. pat February 22nd, 2011 at 7:33 pm

    Mauer getting lubricant injections in his knees today.

    I would think that doesn’t speak well to the longevity of his career at catcher.

  8. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 22nd, 2011 at 7:34 pm

    LGY, absolutely consulting outside sources is allowed. In fact it’s encouraged! There is no way I would be able to figure these things out, many of them, without some fast Googling. But I recommend Googling as quickly as possible because GB and Fran are pretty knowledgeable.

    I am happy to change the timing of the questions so that there are more fair to everyone. I believe in a level playing field. I don’t think anyone would mind a time change so long as they are made aware of it. Any suggestions? Don’t forget we have two QsOTD, one early, one later.

  9. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 7:34 pm

    Mauer’s use of performance enhancing substances is appalling.

  10. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 7:34 pm

    Bengie Molina and his line against righthanded pitching may have had something to do with that, its what Tony La Russa would have done. .213 .253 .292 .545

  11. West Coast Yankee Fan February 22nd, 2011 at 7:34 pm

    A 6’5″ catcher. Not a recipe for longevity.

  12. West Coast Yankee Fan February 22nd, 2011 at 7:36 pm

    Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 7:34 pm

    Bengie Molina and his line against righthanded pitching may have had something to do with that, its what Tony La Russa would have done. .213 .253 .292 .545

    ***********

    Thank you for making my point as to why having a feel for your players and the game unfolding before you is more important than statistics.

  13. kd February 22nd, 2011 at 7:36 pm

    where will mauer play? 1b? 3b? outfield? his bat will definitely get better without daily catching

  14. West Coast Yankee Fan February 22nd, 2011 at 7:37 pm

    As if 80% of all Yankee fans weren’t screaming at their televisions to take Burnett out of the game after getting five good innings from him.

  15. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 22nd, 2011 at 7:38 pm

    “A 6’5? catcher. Not a recipe for longevity.”

    Thinking the same thing. I’m pretty sure Matt Wieters is up there also.

  16. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 7:39 pm

    As if 80% of all Yankee fans weren’t screaming at their televisions to take Burnett out of the game after getting five good innings from him.

    Real fans have faith in their pitcher being able to get out a .200 hitter.

  17. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 22nd, 2011 at 7:40 pm

    LGY and anyone else. What would you think of 2 in the afternoon and 8 at night?

    My morning walk screws me up from about 10:15 ’til about 1:30.

  18. GreenBeret7 February 22nd, 2011 at 7:41 pm

    My pleasure, Trisha. If changing times and structure helps get more people playing, by all means, make the changes you feel helps. Keep up the great work.

  19. Melkmanisinhotlanta February 22nd, 2011 at 7:42 pm

    Hank Steinbrenner you rock. Thanks for telling it like it is. Jeter was busy with that ridiculous mansion and letting his numbers slip. A little bit of George’s voice is left via Hank. Keep up the good work.

  20. LGY February 22nd, 2011 at 7:43 pm

    Trisha,

    I was just kidding about the level playing field thing. I think 10 works b/c the morning crew is around then.

  21. Melkmanisinhotlanta February 22nd, 2011 at 7:45 pm

    Did jeter marry the hollywood actress? Why do NYY stars marry these crazy women? Just doesn’t make sense.

  22. LGY February 22nd, 2011 at 7:45 pm

    At the time, Girardi said he left Burnett in to face Molina, because he liked the way he was throwing the ball.

  23. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 7:46 pm

    It’s still like a dog chasing its tail. How can you force a team to spend when they can’t generate the revenues because they can’t put fans in the seats because they don’t have the players that would bring the fans to the games? And why should they be axed because they are victims of finances?

    You have to risk something to win big. Spend money to make money. What are you expecting? That a franchise is placed into a wasteland, doesn’t have to put any money into it, and can just generate a winner? Why shouldn’t owners be expected to contribute? And how are they victims of finances? If you put a team into a bad location where it can’t sustain itself then the team should be moved to a better location. Its not up to MLB to fight against natural selection and pump money into a dying area.

    If more than 50% of the teams in baseball can sustain a healthy payroll, you don’t bring them all down to the level of the worst teams, you get rid of them. The problem with you is your idea that everything needs to be fair. In sport this is not the case. Every major population center does not need a team, every state does not need a team. New York can probably sustain another team or two, but they were moved out to give the West Coast some teams.

    Miami does not need a team, and baseball does not need to cater to their owners frugal whims.

  24. Bronx Jeers February 22nd, 2011 at 7:46 pm

    No troll feeding please.

  25. GreenBeret7 February 22nd, 2011 at 7:47 pm

    It’s too bad that Fisk, Lance Parrish, Piazza and Sandy Alomar couldn’t last long in baseball. All were 6’4″ and 6’5″

  26. Melkmanisinhotlanta February 22nd, 2011 at 7:47 pm

    The funny thing about Jeter and the rich baseball players, they all vote democrat and subscribe to that religion. Very sad that hypocrisy is the glue that keeps their baseball hyde together..

  27. West Coast Yankee Fan February 22nd, 2011 at 7:47 pm

    You don’t put the winning run on base – you don’t leave Burnett of all pitchers in the game after managing to get 5 decent innings from him. This is not hindsight, everyone I was watching the game with couldn’t believe it.

  28. Melkmanisinhotlanta February 22nd, 2011 at 7:49 pm

    I’m sure Jete is against global warming as he builds his 25000 sq foot monstrosity.

  29. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 7:50 pm

    Burnett to that point had given up 5 hits, none for extra bases.

  30. Melkmanisinhotlanta February 22nd, 2011 at 7:51 pm

    The rich baseball players would want to play in Miami because there isn’t state income tax. Ask Jetes about paying taxes lol.

  31. Rich in NJ February 22nd, 2011 at 7:52 pm

    There’s is some freakin’ crazy stuff posted on this thread.

  32. Melkmanisinhotlanta February 22nd, 2011 at 7:52 pm

    Burnett will have a good year this year and in 2013. Just in time for the new contract.

  33. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 7:53 pm

    The rich baseball players would want to play in Miami because there isn’t state income tax. Ask Jetes about paying taxes lol.

    Or they could simply maintain florida residence and play for a team that will pay them real money.

  34. Melkmanisinhotlanta February 22nd, 2011 at 7:54 pm

    Hank Steinbrenner rocks for telling it like it is. It’s insane that anybody needs 25,000 sq feet.

  35. West Coast Yankee Fan February 22nd, 2011 at 7:54 pm

    According to Baseball Reference.com:

    Fisk was 6’3″
    Parrish was 6’3″
    Mike Piazza was 6’3″
    Sandy Alomar was 6’5″ (never caught more than 132 games in 20 seasons and caught less than 90 games 15 seasons)

    Yogi Berra – 5’7″ (19 seasons behind the plate)
    Pudge Rodriguez – 5’9″ (20 seasons behind the plate)

  36. LGY February 22nd, 2011 at 7:55 pm

    The binder would likely say that Joba was a better matchup against Molina, than leaving AJ in.

  37. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 22nd, 2011 at 7:55 pm

    LGY we could stay with 10 in the morning and go with 8 at night. I think I like that better.

  38. Melkmanisinhotlanta February 22nd, 2011 at 7:57 pm

    It’s sad that tax avoidance has to be applied to such an extreme. The oddity of having a union for these business people players who are blatant capitalists. I had to push Jose Contreras to sign a free autograph. Wonder if Jetes would ever do that?

  39. LGY February 22nd, 2011 at 7:57 pm

    Putting the winning run on base thing is really dumb to argue. It is not like Molina doubled and Murphy scored.

    Molina homered. It didn’t matter that Murphy was put on base.

  40. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 7:58 pm

    Yogi only ever caught more than 121 games 7 times. 11 times he caught less.

  41. Melkmanisinhotlanta February 22nd, 2011 at 7:59 pm

    Where’s SJ? What’s his take on Brackman? I see that kid coming up in September.

  42. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 7:59 pm

    Pudge averaged 120 games behind the plate. If Montero can catch half that he will be worth it.

  43. LGY February 22nd, 2011 at 8:01 pm

    Honestly, I don’t even understand this argument. Girardi left Burnett in too long because of the numbers instead of using his gut?

    He did both. His gut told him to leave Burnett in, but to maximize that gut feeling he went with the better matchup.

    If he had just stuck to his numbers instead of going for his gut that AJ was throwing the ball well, it probably never happens.

    Damn you Girardi and your over-reliance on your gut!! :mad:

  44. West Coast Yankee Fan February 22nd, 2011 at 8:03 pm

    LGY – that’s hindsight. You don’t put the winning run on base, that’s 101A stuff. But look, go ahead defend Girardi in that game if you want to. You’re entitled to your opinion.

  45. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 8:08 pm

    You don’t put the winning run on base, that’s 101A stuff.

    The BOOK says not to do that, if your gut says to do it, you do it.

  46. West Coast Yankee Fan February 22nd, 2011 at 8:09 pm

    Let’s review.

    - I think Girardi’s managing in that game against Texas was poor.

    - I think catchers over 6’5″ are risky propositions, i.e. Mauer’s back issues.

    I’ll save you the time. I must be a Red Sox fan and a troll. I think I’ll have a beer now.

    : )

  47. Rich in NJ February 22nd, 2011 at 8:11 pm

    Playing catcher is a risky proposition.

  48. jacksquat February 22nd, 2011 at 8:15 pm

    Let’s see, Jeter building a mansion was in the news. I didn’t hear about any other Yankee’s mansion building. He also had a down year. Personally, I think Hank was referring to Jeter, then later attempted to backtrack when it blew up, probably after his brother talked to him.

    But that’s just Hank being Hank.

  49. LGY February 22nd, 2011 at 8:17 pm

    I think Girardi’s managing in that game was poor as well, but not because of something silly like it being the binder’s fault.

  50. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 8:22 pm

    I think Bengie Molina got lucky more than anything else.

  51. Giuseppe Franco February 22nd, 2011 at 8:24 pm

    Regardless of how Girardi supposedly managed against Texas is almost irrelevant since the Yanks clearly got outplayed that series.

  52. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 8:27 pm

    When you get shut down twice by Colby Lewis then its just not your year….

  53. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 8:27 pm

    When you get shut down twice by Colby Lewis then its just not your year….

    It certainly helped he was given a generous zone outside.

  54. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 8:32 pm

    Jerkface,

    That’s a fact but still….he’s an OK pitcher but they just didn’t hit the entire series.

  55. m February 22nd, 2011 at 8:43 pm

    Okay. Just seeing Williams’s comment about paying one player $30M being asinine. I actually laughed at that. It is a little rich. What do you guys think the top position players should be making? If you could re-do the scale?

  56. GreenBeret7 February 22nd, 2011 at 8:51 pm

    When baseball stops making the money thet are making, agents and players will stop asking and getting it. As I said earlier, it’s not the negotiated contracts, it’s arbitration. Baeball is now baying premium price for mediocrity. (#4 & #5 outfielders, utility players, # 5 pitchers and bullpens).

  57. Joe from Long Island February 22nd, 2011 at 8:51 pm

    The Yanks got outplayed by Texas, plain and simple. Even in Game 1, except for that one inning.

    What difference does it make now? It’s over. Enough with the revisionist history. It’s 2011. A new season, and all that.

  58. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 8:52 pm

    I think if teams don’t want to pay players 30 million dollars then they just shouldn’t pay them 30 million dollars.

  59. GreenBeret7 February 22nd, 2011 at 8:52 pm

    ***Baseball is now paying***

  60. Rich in NJ February 22nd, 2011 at 8:58 pm

    “As I said earlier, it’s not the negotiated contracts, it’s arbitration. ”

    Which Big Stein always used to say as well.

  61. GreenBeret7 February 22nd, 2011 at 9:01 pm

    Steinbrenner said from the day the owners voted for arbitration that it would cost them more than FAs and he was correct. He’s the only one to vote against it.e

  62. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 9:10 pm

    Speaking of salaries….something I have been wondering? Why arent more of the elite athletes in this country playing baseball and will that change if things continue as they currently are?

    There are of course a lot of great athletes still growing up playing baseball but probably not nearly as many as say football. If research on concussions continues to progress and brings to light dangers associated with the collisions in football and the salary disparity between the two sports continue then might more of these kids consider baseball…….if you have guaranteed contracts, can play twice as long, make more money, and have a better chance to remember your grandkids one day…..seems appealing.

  63. GreenBeret7 February 22nd, 2011 at 9:12 pm

    Blake, instant big money and straight to the bigs. No bus riding through the majors.

  64. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 9:13 pm

    Harder to play pickup baseball, requires too much equiment and a specialized field. Soccer, Football, and Basketball can be played with readily available resources (field, any hard top with a hoop etc), schools don’t offer many scholarships for baseball.

    Its why I want there to be more focus on bringing back RBI and other baseball clubs.

  65. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 9:15 pm

    Gb,

    That is the most likely reasoning. Baseball is an aquired skill as much as it is a natural talent so while it might be better after you get to the big leagues…..the road there is much longer than with other sports in many cases.

  66. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 9:19 pm

    You can play pickup football but its not like real football with pads…..being a great baseball player just takes a ton of work and.constant refinement ……you can’t just go out and run a 4.3 40 and get noticed. The NFL really is the worst for the players though…..they make the least money, they get the crap beat out of them, and their contracts aren’t guaranteed.

  67. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 22nd, 2011 at 9:19 pm

    “Because the teams with the lowest payrolls have the richest owners.”

    Definitely does not appear to be the case. The Nats, as we know, have really opened up their pocketbook. And Oakland’s owner is notoriously cheap, from everything I have ever read. Otherwise it appears that teams with the most wealthy owners are not typically the ones with the lowest payrolls.

    2010 PAYROLL in descending order- teams with billlioniare (richest) owners are bolded.

    N.Y. Yankees $206,333,389

    Boston 162,747,333

    Chicago Cubs 146,859,000

    Philadelphia 141,927,381

    New York Mets 132,701,445

    Detroit 122,864,929

    Chicago White Sox 108,273,197

    Los Angeles Angels 105,013,667

    Seattle 98,376,667

    San Francisco 97,828,833

    Minnesota 97,559,167

    Los Angeles Dodgers 94,945,517

    St. Louis 93,540,753

    Houston 92,355,500

    Atlanta 84,423,667

    Colorado 84,227,000

    Baltimore 81,612,500

    Milwaukee 81,108,279

    Cincinnati 72,386,544

    Kansas City 72,267,710

    Tampa Bay 71,923,471

    Toronto 62,689,357

    Washington 61,425,000

    Cleveland 61,203,967

    Arizona 60,718,167

    Florida 55,641,500

    Texas 55,250,545

    Oakland 51,654,900

    San Diego 37,799,300

    Pittsburgh 34,943,000

  68. Dionysius Thelxinoe February 22nd, 2011 at 9:19 pm

    Speaking of salaries….something I have been wondering? Why arent more of the elite athletes in this country playing baseball and will that change if things continue as they currently are?

    ——–

    Cause they suck at baseball? (think Michael Jordan in a White Sox uniform)

  69. GreenBeret7 February 22nd, 2011 at 9:20 pm

    No bus riding through the majors.

    ———————————————————————————————————————

    Correction

    No bus riding through the ***minors***

  70. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 9:22 pm

    Im more talking about football because the body types of most typical NBA players don’t match up with baseball……

  71. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 9:26 pm

    Besides….you could take just about anybody who hasn’t played baseball since little league and throw them in against minor league pitching at age 30 and they wont do too well. Jordan didn’t do all that bad considering…….r

  72. Dionysius Thelxinoe February 22nd, 2011 at 9:28 pm

    blake says:
    February 22, 2011 at 9:22 pm
    Im more talking about football because the body types of most typical NBA players don’t match up with baseball……

    ———–

    Alrighty then!

    Cause they suck at baseball? (think Deion Sanders in a Yankees uniform)

  73. GreenBeret7 February 22nd, 2011 at 9:28 pm

    trisha, the Pohlad family are some of the richest people in America, as are the Glass/Walton families (Wal-Mart). Mariners are owned by Nintendo. Until recently. the Wilpons had more money than the Steinbrenners. Houston is owned by Drayron McLane, owner of McLane trucking and the largest food distributorship in the southwest/ They supply almost all of the little stop and robs like 7-11 and U-Totem.

  74. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 9:29 pm

    My point was that if they started playing baseball at early ages then they wouldn’t suck at baseball.

  75. GreenBeret7 February 22nd, 2011 at 9:30 pm

    the Rodgers family has enough money to float loans to Canada (they own the Blue Jays)

  76. West Coast Yankee Fan February 22nd, 2011 at 9:30 pm

    A very interesting player Mark Trumbo is competing for a starting job with the Angels. He hit 36 home runs with 122 RBI’s in AAA last year and has hit 120 home runs in five seasons in the minors – hitting .275 with an .804 OPS.

  77. Dionysius Thelxinoe February 22nd, 2011 at 9:33 pm

    blake says:
    February 22, 2011 at 9:26 pm
    Besides….you could take just about anybody who hasn’t played baseball since little league and throw them in against minor league pitching at age 30 and they wont do too well. Jordan didn’t do all that bad considering…….r

    ———

    True. I don’t know WHAT Jordan was thinking, seriously. That had zero chance of success. But they got to sell out a few minor league games.

  78. Erica in NY February 22nd, 2011 at 9:34 pm

    I am now alone in my office and its creepy :-(

    Just wanted to share that

  79. Tom in N.J. February 22nd, 2011 at 9:35 pm

    The average NBA player is six-foot-seven, or the height of CC. That’s crazy.

  80. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 9:35 pm

    He did it because his dad had just been murdered and because he always wanted him to be a baseball player when he was young…..just his way of coping most likely.

  81. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 9:36 pm

    . I don’t know WHAT Jordan was thinking, seriously.

    He loved baseball and wanted to try playing baseball because of his love for the game. That is what he was thinking. He regretted not spending more time with baseball as a kid but he was obviously gifted at bball.

  82. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 22nd, 2011 at 9:37 pm

    GB, I gave the billionaires according to Forbes magazine. I think that the stock market took a toll on some of the owners’ portfolios. Forbes also gave the owners who are involved in corporations that own teams. That accounts for the Mariners. Hiroshi Yaumachi is the largest individual shareholder in Nintendo. His worth is 4.2 billion. He bought the Mariners in 1992 and then transferred ownership to Nintendo US.

  83. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 22nd, 2011 at 9:38 pm

    And Houston was listed in there.

  84. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 9:38 pm

    Im more talking about football because the body types of most typical NBA players don’t match up with baseball……

    One thing re: basketball vs baseball is that there might be elite athletes who grow up playing basketball because everyone else is that would never make it to the NBA (too small) and thus squander their chance to play baseball. If everyone on your block is playing pickup basketball you end up playing it as well.

  85. Carl February 22nd, 2011 at 9:38 pm

    I wonder if the strike never happened. Would Jordan have stuck with baseball?

  86. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 9:40 pm

    “I wonder if the strike never happened. Would Jordan have stuck with baseball?”

    Nah….

  87. Joe from Long Island February 22nd, 2011 at 9:41 pm

    Erica – If you feel unsafe, you should leave. No job is worth your personal safety.

  88. GreenBeret7 February 22nd, 2011 at 9:41 pm

    Thanks, Trisha. Missed houston. I don’t read Forbes. No centerfolds.

  89. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 9:42 pm

    Jerkface,

    Good points and MLB really needs to do the best they can to give those.kids that want to play baseball in cities the means to do so.

  90. Dionysius Thelxinoe February 22nd, 2011 at 9:43 pm

    Carl says:
    February 22, 2011 at 9:38 pm
    I wonder if the strike never happened. Would Jordan have stuck with baseball?

    ———–

    No, man, he sucked!!!

    He was at the top of his sport when he ‘retired’ from basketball. Among the things he was not prepared for in baseball was the acceptance of mediocrity.

  91. Erica in NY February 22nd, 2011 at 9:46 pm

    Joe from Long Island February 22nd, 2011 at 9:41 pm
    Erica – If you feel unsafe, you should leave. No job is worth your personal safety.

    ************

    I am going now.

    The worst part is the heat was off at 6pm. Brrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr

  92. Dionysius Thelxinoe February 22nd, 2011 at 9:47 pm

    Jerkface says:
    February 22, 2011 at 9:36 pm
    . I don’t know WHAT Jordan was thinking, seriously.

    He loved baseball and wanted to try playing baseball because of his love for the game. That is what he was thinking. He regretted not spending more time with baseball as a kid but he was obviously gifted at bball.

    ——-

    I know all that, Jf.

    But as Blake correctly pointed out … at 30???

    THAT’S what I was referring to when I said ‘What was he thinking’

  93. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 9:49 pm

    HAT’S what I was referring to when I said ‘What was he thinking’

    I don’t get it, you’re deriding him for doing something he always wanted to do?

  94. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 9:50 pm

    Maybe he was thinking,”Well I’m not going to have a chance at this anymore so I’ll try now”

  95. Dionysius Thelxinoe February 22nd, 2011 at 9:51 pm

    Michael Jeffrey Jordan is the second greatest athlete I’ve ever seen.

    The greatest? Secretariat. No bs.

  96. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 9:51 pm

    Jordan’s dad always wanted him to play baseball…..he had just be murdered, he did it because he wanted to try it, to clear his head, and for his father…..

  97. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 9:52 pm

    Secretariat was a horse.

  98. Dionysius Thelxinoe February 22nd, 2011 at 9:52 pm

    Third greatest? Lawrence Taylor, in his first five years.

  99. Dionysius Thelxinoe February 22nd, 2011 at 9:53 pm

    blake says:
    February 22, 2011 at 9:52 pm
    Secretariat was a horse.

    —–

    You noticed? So?

  100. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 9:55 pm

    So…..horses are horses not human athletes.

  101. GreenBeret7 February 22nd, 2011 at 9:56 pm

    Any list of greatest athletes in the last 40 years will start with Bo Jackson

  102. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 9:56 pm

    The greatest human athlete I ever saw was the genetically engineered super-being Zorthax, part shark, part bulldog, tiny smidge human.

  103. Joe from Long Island February 22nd, 2011 at 9:57 pm

    Michael Jordan did not accomplish his historic feats by being timid. By striving to be the best ever, he, arguably, did just that. He must have one healthy ego. A lot of successful athletes do. That’s a big part of their success, by having supreme belief in success, and by never considering anything else. (The psychology of sports is fascinating, all by itself.)

    Just as a guess, I think he thought he would succeed at baseball. My guess is that not succeeding at baseball, being mediocre – or worse – never entered his mind.

    On that note, have a good night everybody. And get home safe, Erica.

  104. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 9:58 pm

    What did Zorthax play? I think I saw a movie on SciFi about him once

  105. Dionysius Thelxinoe February 22nd, 2011 at 9:59 pm

    Jerkface says:
    February 22, 2011 at 9:49 pm
    HAT’S what I was referring to when I said ‘What was he thinking’

    I don’t get it, you’re deriding him for doing something he always wanted to do?

    ———-

    Deriding? Not my style. You may be confusing me with one of your favorite posters here.

    I knew it was a mistake when he announced his intention.

    I knew about his Dad, his murder, Jordan’s motivations. Makes for a nice story in Readers Digest. But it doesn’t work that way in real life. Not at 30.

  106. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 10:00 pm

    What did Zorthax play? I think I saw a movie on SciFi about him once

    Rocketball and Blood-surfing mostly, though he has retired from those to focus on Mutant League Hockey, its what his recently deceased progenitor wanted. Though rumors abound that it was the rampage which set Zorthax free which killed the progenitor.

  107. West Coast Yankee Fan February 22nd, 2011 at 10:00 pm

    Craig Ferguson agrees with you about Secretariat. Giddyup.

  108. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 10:01 pm

    I knew about his Dad, his murder, Jordan’s motivations. Makes for a nice story in Readers Digest. But it doesn’t work that way in real life. Not at 30.

    Ok but I don’t get it? You said ‘What was he thinking?” , but you freely admit to knowing what he was thinking. He didn’t have to succeed, he just wanted to try.

  109. Dionysius Thelxinoe February 22nd, 2011 at 10:02 pm

    GreenBeret7 says:
    February 22, 2011 at 9:56 pm
    Any list of greatest athletes in the last 40 years will start with Bo Jackson

    —–

    GB, wasn’t it Bo Jackson who ran over Brian Bosworth like a freight train in a Monday night game?

    Bosworth was getting all the ink after signing a huge contract.

    IIRC, Bo laid him out flat on his back.

  110. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 10:02 pm

    Rocketball and Blood-surfing mostly, though he has retired from those to focus on Mutant League Hockey, its what his recently deceased progenitor wanted. Though rumors abound that it was the rampage which set Zorthax free which killed the progenitor. ”

    Nice

  111. GreenBeret7 February 22nd, 2011 at 10:03 pm

    Best of all time? Jim Thorpe: Decathalon and Pentathalon in the same Olympics, MLB basball player college and NFL HOF and professional basketball

  112. Dionysius Thelxinoe February 22nd, 2011 at 10:06 pm

    Ok but I don’t get it? You said ‘What was he thinking?” , but you freely admit to knowing what he was thinking. He didn’t have to succeed, he just wanted to try.

    ———

    Jf, you don’t really believe that last sentence, do you?

  113. m February 22nd, 2011 at 10:08 pm

    I love the world champs or bust mentality. But I’d rather see it from the players than hear it from the Yankees ownership.

    I know the Yankees get paid a ton, but the pressure from ownership to win or else is a little crazy.

    And people wonder why the Yankees were wound so tightly in the 2000′s?

  114. Dionysius Thelxinoe February 22nd, 2011 at 10:09 pm

    GreenBeret7 says:
    February 22, 2011 at 10:03 pm
    Best of all time? Jim Thorpe: Decathalon and Pentathalon in the same Olympics, MLB basball player college and NFL HOF and professional basketball

    ——-

    I admit to being older than dirt.

    But Jim Thorpe was even before my time. My greatest athletes ranking are guys I’ve seen. Or ladies.

  115. GreenBeret7 February 22nd, 2011 at 10:10 pm

    Dionysius Thelxinoe February 22nd, 2011 at 10:02 pm
    GreenBeret7 says:
    February 22, 2011 at 9:56 pm
    Any list of greatest athletes in the last 40 years will start with Bo Jackson

    —–

    GB, wasn’t it Bo Jackson who ran over Brian Bosworth like a freight train in a Monday night game?

    Bosworth was getting all the ink after signing a huge contract.

    IIRC, Bo laid him out flat on his back.

    ———————————————————————————————————————

    On MNF. baseball All star MVP and Heisman winner.

  116. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 10:10 pm

    As competitive as MJ was I doubt he really thought he had a 2nd career as a big league baseball player…..he did it because of the reasons already mentioned and because he happened to play for an owner that could make it happen.

  117. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 10:10 pm

    Yes, was Jordan destroyed by his attempt at baseball? No, he went back to BBall and dominated, and had the peace of mind of knowing he at least attempted to play baseball.

  118. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 10:11 pm

    But Jim Thorpe was even before my time. My greatest athletes ranking are guys I’ve seen. Or ladies.”

    Or horses ;)

  119. GreenBeret7 February 22nd, 2011 at 10:12 pm

    I only menthioned Thorpe for Randy’s benefit. He helped train Thorpe.

  120. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 22nd, 2011 at 10:12 pm

    We’ll now take a look team value, in descending order. The number after the team represents where they rank in team payroll. The ones with the richest owners are still bolded. At this point I don’t even know what it all means!

    Well yeah I know what it should mean. It should mean that the bolded teams should all rank near the top in terms of payroll, for one thing. How do they rank?

    1, 3, 8, 9, 14, 15, 23, 28. Not optimal but certainly more near the top than the bottom. I think you can also take a look at value and payroll and hope there is a positive correlation there. (where it gets a little dicey is when you see a team like Oakland whose value is in the toilet, whose payroll is near the bottom – seemingly acceptable correlations – and then you see its owner as one of the richest owners in baseball. That’s when it begins to stink!)

    Kudos to the teams whose number to the right is lower to their number to the left (where that’s possible). That means that in terms of team rankings, they are spending more on payroll than teams with a greater value than theirs!

    Maybe more should go into it. But my eyes are crossed at this point and it seemed like the most direct way to do some kind of comparisons.

    It also unequivocally means that poor Pittsburgh needs some genuine help. Last in value, last in payroll, no rich owners. :(

    1 New York Yankees 1
    2 Boston Red Sox 2
    3 New York Mets 5
    4 Los Angeles Dodgers 12
    5 Chicago Cubs 3
    6 Philadelphia Phillies 4
    7 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim 8
    8 St Louis Cardinals 13
    9 San Francisco Giants 10
    10 Chicago White Sox 7
    11 Houston Astros 14
    12 Texas Rangers 27
    13 Atlanta Braves 15
    14 Seattle Mariners 9
    15 San Diego Padres 29
    16 Minnesota Twins 11
    17 Cleveland Indians 24
    18 Washington Nationals 23
    19 Colorado Rockies 16
    20 Arizona Diamondbacks 25
    21 Baltimore Orioles 17
    22 Detroit Tigers 6
    23 Milwaukee Brewers 18
    24 Kansas City Royals 20
    25 Cincinnati Reds 19
    26 Toronto Blue Jays 22
    27 Florida Marlins 26
    28 Tampa Bay Rays 21
    29 Oakland Athletics 28
    30 Pittsburgh Pirates 30

    I would be interested in seeing the entire ranking of owner wealth. For instance I know that last year the Suxers owners and Rangers were in the billionaire category. So they still have to be up there. Same with Cincy. That will be my next venture.

    Tomorrow or so.

    :)

  121. m February 22nd, 2011 at 10:13 pm

    I think Jordan is the ultimate competitor. And he wanted a new challenge. But when you look at what the minor league system is about (which is to develop young ball players into major leaguers) then Jordan was not in it for the same reasons. Seemed more like a hobby, even though he was probably the hardest worker on the team.

  122. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 10:16 pm

    I think Jordan is the type of person that if he had a desire to try baseball and had the opportunity to do it and he didn’t then it would have ate at him the rest of his life…..

  123. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 22nd, 2011 at 10:17 pm

    “Thanks, Trisha. Missed houston. I don’t read Forbes. No centerfolds”

    :lol:

    Well I of course got this valuable information through the goodness of Google!

    Forbes isn’t my favorite reading material either.

    :)

    See you in the a.m. – 10ish – for the morning QOTD. I think 8 p.m. is a better time for the evening one, especially for the questioner.

  124. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 10:18 pm

    I think Jordan is the type of person that if he had a desire to try baseball and had the opportunity to do it and he didn’t then it would have ate at him the rest of his life…..

    Exactly, he was in the unique position to fulfill one of his dreams and honor the memory of his father.

  125. Dionysius Thelxinoe February 22nd, 2011 at 10:21 pm

    blake says:
    February 22, 2011 at 9:55 pm
    So…..horses are horses not human athletes.

    ———

    Elitist!

    He was #35 on espn’s list of 100 greatest athletes. In greatest athletic performances, his Belmont win was second only to Wilt’s 100-point game.

  126. LGY February 22nd, 2011 at 10:22 pm

    Jordan is the best athlete I have ever seen.

    He beat a bunch of magically enhanced super aliens.

    Who else can claim that??

  127. Dionysius Thelxinoe February 22nd, 2011 at 10:23 pm

    blake says:
    February 22, 2011 at 10:11 pm
    But Jim Thorpe was even before my time. My greatest athletes ranking are guys I’ve seen. Or ladies.”

    Or horses

    ——–

    Thank you
    :lol:

  128. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 10:24 pm

    Who else can claim that??

    Zorthax routinely matches up against Rocketball players with more than 45% cybernetic enhancement and one rumored to be the lost prince of an ancient and terrible civilization.

  129. LGY February 22nd, 2011 at 10:25 pm

    Lola Bunny probably second on my list.

    Maybe first.

  130. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 10:26 pm

    The fact that a horse was on that list was crazy….although MJ was rightfully #1.

  131. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 22nd, 2011 at 10:26 pm

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02.....uconn.html

    Wow. If this was discussed earlier, I apparently missed it.

  132. blake February 22nd, 2011 at 10:27 pm

    LGY,

    :)

  133. Dionysius Thelxinoe February 22nd, 2011 at 10:28 pm

    Jerkface says:
    February 22, 2011 at 10:18 pm
    I think Jordan is the type of person that if he had a desire to try baseball and had the opportunity to do it and he didn’t then it would have ate at him the rest of his life…..

    Exactly, he was in the unique position to fulfill one of his dreams and honor the memory of his father.

    ——-

    Gotta agree on both points.

  134. LGY February 22nd, 2011 at 10:29 pm

    WTF is Zorthax?

  135. m February 22nd, 2011 at 10:30 pm

    In terms of pure athleticism, NBA as a group is at or near the top IMO. They need skills, eye-hand coordination, grace, strength, quick reflexes, speed, etc. Yes, you need height, but to combine quickness and balance with a 6.5-7 ft frame is amazing.

  136. m February 22nd, 2011 at 10:31 pm

    And by and large, basketball players donut without PEDs.

  137. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 10:32 pm

    WTF is Zorthax?

    The greatest rocketball and blood-surfing genetically engineered super-creature of our time.

  138. m February 22nd, 2011 at 10:33 pm

    *Do it

  139. Jackson February 22nd, 2011 at 10:36 pm

    And by and large, basketball players donut without PEDs.

    -

    How do we know this? (Understanding your correction)

  140. LGY February 22nd, 2011 at 10:41 pm

    Follow up question:

    WTF is rocketball and blood surfing?

  141. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 10:41 pm

    At a 2005 hearing on Capitol Hill, lawmakers described the NBA’s steroid policy as “a joke,” “the weakest” among major professional sports, and “pathetic.”

  142. m February 22nd, 2011 at 10:42 pm

    We don’t know it. But we know that anabolic and other substances are common in football and baseball. Doping is rampant in cycling.

    The worst we heard is Rashard Lewis getting busted for a stimulant? To me, that’s by and large. It’s most likely that basketball players don’t benefit from bulking up. They may be using other undetectable super drugs for some other purposes that haven’t come to our attention. Not saying it’s non-existent. But pure athlete? Pure is the key word there.

  143. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 10:43 pm

    The testing of NBA players for anabolic steroids and performance-enhancing drugs started with the 1999-2000 season. The players were tested once during training camp, rookies were tested three additional times during the course of the regular season. The testing was conducted on a random basis – i.e., without prior notice to the player. The players who tested positive under the 1999 program were required to be suspended for 5 games (first offense), 10 games (second offense), and 25 games (subsequent offenses).

    Read more: http://www.articlesbase.com/he.....z1EkZFko7a
    Under Creative Commons License: Attribution

  144. LGY February 22nd, 2011 at 10:43 pm

    I can assure you that Eddy Curry for one eats donuts and does without PEDs.

  145. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 10:45 pm

    The worst we heard is Rashard Lewis getting busted for a stimulant? To me, that’s by and large. It’s most likely that basketball players don’t benefit from bulking up. They may be using other undetectable super drugs for some other purposes that haven’t come to our attention. Not saying it’s non-existent. But pure athlete? Pure is the key word there.

    Players in basketball need to be strong, perhaps stronger than is naturally possible. You have centers that need to be able to muscle up under the rim, retain possession of the ball, etc.

  146. LGY February 22nd, 2011 at 10:45 pm

    My evidence of course

    http://www.google.com/imgres?i.....38;bih=707

  147. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 10:46 pm

    I wonder if the NBA has increased their testing. Its easy to cycle around a specific time period for testing.

  148. randy l. February 22nd, 2011 at 10:48 pm

    i saw michael jordan up close when he was trying to play baseball with the white sox. francona’s hitting coach was a roommate during spring training for a short time so i got to hear and see a lot of jordan.

    he had very good eye hand coordination and made contact with the ball, but he had no concept of releasing the bat. i watched him one day hit 40 -50 balls and never reach the warning track on the fly.

    he ran really well and played a decent outfield and tracked fly balls well. could he have made the majors ? maybe, but he really had almost no power because of how he swing with almost locked wrists. he certainly was no bo jackson in baseball.

  149. m February 22nd, 2011 at 10:49 pm

    They all need to be strong. To body up and get past other players. But they don’t benefit from bulking up as the term is normally used.

  150. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 10:50 pm

    They all need to be strong. To body up and get past other players. But they don’t benefit from bulking up as the term is normally used.

    Neither do baseball players.

  151. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 10:51 pm

    You also have a similar physical grind to basketball where they are playing a lot of games and doing a lot of work during the game. They could be using performance enhancing drugs to merely maintain their weights be speeding up the healing process, allowing for more work to be done in a shorter time.

  152. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 10:51 pm

    Cyclists and Runners certainly do not need to bulk up after all.

  153. LGY February 22nd, 2011 at 10:53 pm

    :arrow:

  154. m February 22nd, 2011 at 10:54 pm

    I thought I clearly divided cyclists from the football/baseball players.

  155. Jerkface February 22nd, 2011 at 10:56 pm

    You divided out blood doping, which isn’t even really a thing and I don’t understand why its banned since you can do the same thing legally, but runners have been zapped for steroids.

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