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A New York Yankees blog by Chad Jennings and the staff of The Journal News


Pinch hitting: Anthony Solano

Posted by: Chad Jennings - Posted in Misc on Jan 20, 2013 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

It’s Sunday morning in New York, which means it’s – I don’t know – something like Wednesday afternoon where our next Pinch Hitter is from. Anthony Solano is a 20-year-old college student from Sydney, Australia, and as part of a school project last year, he looked into the global exposure of professional sports franchise and the way they’re able to connect with fans around the world.

For his post, Anthony is bringing us a taste of what he learned in Australia, looking into whether the Yankees new financial strategy might hurt their global brand.

Believe it or not, the Yankee universe extends beyond the realms of North and Central America and beyond even Asia to countries all over the globe. Whilst the fishbowl is squarely located in the Bronx, there is an incredible supporter base made up of global fans, many of whom who have never been to the United States let alone New York. These fans, dubbed satellite fans, represent a large reason why the Yankee brand has become of the most powerful in the world.

Born in Sydney, Australia, I am one of these satellite fans, lured to the MLB through a desire to follow the elite after growing up playing baseball despite it being a minority sport in my country. We’ll get back to this in a minute. Most of you will be well across the Yankees incredibly public declaration that they wish to cut payroll to below the luxury tax threshold.

But so what? Surely with a budget of $189M the Yankees can put together a team worthy of another ring.

It is not so much the $10M or so cut in spending that is concerning, rather the attitude associated with this decision. All of a sudden we have virtually seen a shift from a win at all costs approach to one where suddenly money is an issue. Granted, all teams have seemingly awoken from a slumber and realised that players do decline with age and thus are more cautious when dishing out mega deals to free agents, as we have saw with Josh Hamilton this offseason. But isn’t the modern Yankees legacy built upon almost the exact opposite approach? If there’s a hole in the roster, we simply outbid the closest rival for the star free agent and everybody is happy again. And when you can afford an all-star bench it doesn’t hurt either. It is the star power of the Yankees that makes them the team everybody adores or loves to hate. But now the Yankees are beginning to lose their star power, and it has started with this attitude shift in spending.

So what does this mean from my perspective? Studies reveal that satellite fans are drawn to foreign sporting franchises for various reasons, such as past success, storied history or even just participating in a high quality league. But the single most important reason is the existence of star players. This is the star power that the Yankees possess over most other teams given their willingness to spend on the best. I’m concerned now that this new business decision will lessen the aura of stars that define the Yankee universe, and that the majority of a new generation of potential satellite fans will be lost to other teams seeking to rebuild their status in the game based on star power (see Los Angeles x2).

I’m referring to all those kids who live abroad and are just beginning to follow MLB as the pinnacle of the sport, with no intrinsic geographical connection to the Yankees or any other team for that matter. When deciding (almost subconsciously) which team to follow, these kids are attracted for reasons other than because it is the local team or because their father follows them or because their first game attended was at Yankee Stadium.
As a kid back in 2007, I was fascinated by the elite, and there was none bigger than Alex Rodriguez at the time. By far my favourite player, he one of the stars that first attracted me to the Yankees, and I almost followed him out the door during the infamous opt out saga, heartbroken that the game’s best hitter was leaving the Yankees almost without a fight. Before you condemn me for this, remember I was about 13 years old and attracted to the Yankees initially based on one factor — star power. This is what the Yankees stand for, and that should never wane.

I have since learnt to appreciate the bombers for much more than the mega stars we are used to seeing them attract and have developed a strong connection to the Yankee brand. But the allegiances of the younger generation, particularly those abroad, are wide open to be taken. The idea of star power as a catalyst for attracting new fans is crucial, and if the Yankees begin to shift away from this, then it could have a negative impact on its potential fan base.

I mean if you were a kid. who would you pick? Trout, Pujols and Hamilton; Cabrera, Fielder and Verlander at the peak of their powers, or a group of aging veterans past their prime who are legends that continue to produce without the star power they once had?

Associated Press photo

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138 Responses to “Pinch hitting: Anthony Solano”

  1. Shame Spencer January 20th, 2013 at 9:04 am

    Anthony – I’d like to personally extend an invitation to join Team Greedy. You’ve got the goods, kid.

  2. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 9:12 am

    This kid is wierd.

    He likes baseball more than Rugby.

    And he’s an Aussie.

    That would be like an American who thinks soccer is the Cat’s meow over baseball, football, or Basketball.

    A little unusal for sure.

    :)

  3. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 9:18 am

    sp: unusual

  4. Bronx Jeers January 20th, 2013 at 9:21 am

    I felt exactly like this kid when the Canberra Brumbies passed on the aging all-star free agent scrum-half Magnus McHogan.

  5. Shame Spencer January 20th, 2013 at 9:23 am

    Rugby is awesome, btw. It makes football players look pretty weak… which is ridiculous.

  6. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 9:27 am

    Rugby players conside American FB players sisses because of all the protective gear.

    I lived in New Zealand for a year.

    The All-Blacks vs. the Australian champs was an unbelievable spectacle.

    Like our Superbowl. Maybe more.

  7. austinmac January 20th, 2013 at 9:31 am

    MTU,

    Gotta ask. What were you doing in New Zealand?

    I would love to go.

  8. Shame Spencer January 20th, 2013 at 9:33 am

    MTU January 20th, 2013 at 9:27 am

    Rugby players conside American FB players sisses because of all the protective gear.

    I lived in New Zealand for a year.

    The All-Blacks vs. the Australian champs was an unbelievable spectacle.

    Like our Superbowl. Maybe more.

    ——————–

    I saw my first professional match a few years ago in South Africa and it was the most brutal thing I’d ever watched. I still don’t get the rules, but I’m pretty sure it goes something like ‘don’t blow the whistle unless someone is bleeding……a lot.’

  9. randy l. January 20th, 2013 at 9:33 am

    “Fangraphs has Stan ranked 9th all time in career WAR….right ahead of Hornsby and right behind Ted Williams.”

    RIP stan musial.

    stan musial was fading out in the late fifties as mantle was the one whose box score i was checking as i ate my cheerios, so i don’t have a lot of memory of him playing and never saw him live.

    it’s surprising that how many stats he compiled compared to dimaggio and ted willaims so i looked a little closer. dimaggio and williams both lost three seasons to world war two and musial played right through the war until 1945 when the war ended.

    keeping major league baseball going in world war two was decided to be important by roosevelt and others to keep american morale up , but total stats are quite a bit distorted by whether a player lost time to world war two or not.

    as an aside it’s interesting to see that the world war two draft was for only one year. musial was finally drafted to the military in 1945. he lost that one year.

    another thing i didn’t realize about musial is that he was originally signed by the cardinals as a pitcher and was converted after pitching several seasons of minor league baseball. 18-5 in his last year pitching at age 19.

  10. austinmac January 20th, 2013 at 9:34 am

    Dang Shame. You were in South Africa? I have to get out more.

  11. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 9:38 am

    Mac-

    It was a transfer from work. Lived and worked in Auckland.

    Mrs. MTU and I always loved to travel.

    You should. It’s a fascinating place.

    For you as a hiker the South Island and Milford sound area are the place.

    That area is called “Fjordland”.

    For my taste I actually preferred Australia overall.

  12. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 9:41 am

    Time to walk the Mopheads.

    back later.

  13. austinmac January 20th, 2013 at 9:43 am

    Very interesting. In my job, I actually cross county lines. How fun.

    The book I recommended discusses the Babe as someone other than a hard drinking lout. He was portrayed as a thoughtful, yet playful guy who was kind to all he met. These guys hung out with Hemingway and the like. What a time to be a Yankee.

    Of course, they never got to play with Stewie.

  14. randy l. January 20th, 2013 at 9:47 am

    “The idea of star power as a catalyst for attracting new fans is crucial, and if the Yankees begin to shift away from this, then it could have a negative impact on its potential fan base.”

    nice job, anthony.

    it goes without saying that hal is risking losing part of a generation of young fans. one thing i don’t understand is how the yankees didn’t seem to fight for yankee tv and internet brand rights internationally and outside the ny market.

    i would pay a couple of hundred dollars a year to see YES network come to me directly on cable or online.i’m sure you in australia would too. but instead we pay major league baseball to get a mlb package that includes the yankees with all other teams.

    the yankees get 1/30 th of this. this makes no sense. the yankees should be able to get all the money for sending their games to yankee fans no matter where they are. the steinbrenners missed the boat in letting out of market and internet rights get away from them.

    i’m not sure they’ll ever really recover from this because with all this money divided equally in effect baseball is a parity sport now. now maybe for hal this is a way to guarantee a certain amount of profit without having to win.

    parity make work well for hal and hank simply because they don’t seem to have a drive to win or that much interest in baseball. it just seems like business to them , and getting 1/30 th of overall baseball
    income might be just fine with them.

    for yankee fans who go way back, this isn’t going to cut it. or with new ones like you.

  15. Chip January 20th, 2013 at 9:51 am

    So I think it is past time to admit that while the Yankees will still add a piece or two, there won’t be any major shakeups to the current roster (sigh, no Curtis Granderson deal). As of this minute, Eduardo Nunez would be the starting DH – I don’t think that’s going to happen.

    So here’s what I think the starting 25 will be.

    Jeter – SS
    Ichiro – RF
    Tex – 1b
    Cano – 2b
    Youk – 3b
    Granderson – DH
    Romine – C
    Zoilo Almonte – LF
    Brett Gardner – CF

    Bench: Nix, Canzler, Mustelier, Stewart

    Rotation:
    CC, Kuroda, Andy, Hughes, Nova

    Pen:
    LHP: Cabral, Logan
    RHP: Rivera, Aardsma, Joba, Robertson, Phelps

  16. Chip January 20th, 2013 at 9:53 am

    Though I still think that both Travis Hafner and Kelly Johnson would be good signs for the Yankees.

  17. randy l. January 20th, 2013 at 9:57 am

    looking long term, i wonder, in baseball, how much financial advantage teams get from being big market teams now. surely this has changed, but how much. teams like the angels and dodgers seem to still be throwing money around. are they just not seeing the writing on the wall or do they have some revenue source the yankees don’t have.

    it seems that the financial advantage big market teams have is all local. in other words, big market teams have no way to monetize out of market revenue. to me this is a game changer.

    i still feel the yankees missed the boat on out of market streaming rights.

  18. blake January 20th, 2013 at 10:02 am

    It’ll be more than a 10 million cut if they actually get under 189…..more like 30 million in actual payroll from where they normally operate

  19. randy l. January 20th, 2013 at 10:04 am

    the yankees have always excelled by using brute financial force. if baseball has indeed changed more to a parity game, aren’t they going to have to totally use a different strategy to compete. isn’t a tampa style management approach necessary?

    maybe all the craziness going on with the austerity program is just the yankees being stuck in a sea change that’s taking place in baseball. i don’t think any of us have a feeling that the yankees are on top of this. it feels like they are using an old fashioned approach to move into what is a new baseball terrain.

  20. Shame Spencer January 20th, 2013 at 10:06 am

    Chip January 20th, 2013 at 9:51 am

    So I think it is past time to admit that while the Yankees will still add a piece or two, there won’t be any major shakeups to the current roster

    ———————

    There are no games tomorrow, Chip. Let’s extend our state of denial for another two weeks or so. ;)

  21. 86w183 January 20th, 2013 at 10:07 am

    Morning folks —-

    The Yanks could use one LH bat as potential DH, but not two. Johnson makes much more sense than Hafner because he can play some LF and 2B and probably wouldn’t be awful at 3B occasionally.

    The Yankees didn’t “miss the boat” on out of market revenue. MLB controls that. WTBS and WGN were grandfathered in because they are “Superstations” not “Cable Networks”.

    MLB is making a mistake not letting customers pay a premium to get their preferred telecast on the cable package. I understand it for Tampa Bay games (I’m in Florida), but when they are playing anyone else I should have my choice.

    Zoilo Almonte is NOT going to be the Yankees every day LF after hitting .277 in AA.

  22. J. Alfred Prufrock January 20th, 2013 at 10:10 am

    Zoilo Almonte would not be a good fit in left our field. He has some speed to cover, but it’s not like he can fly like Gardner to compensate for some thoroughly bad reads. The good athleticism helps some, but his breaks, and his routes to the ball are sometimes downright bizarre. He has a ways to go as a defender before he can take on our LCF gap.

    If he progresses and gets a look, I would surely have him get his feet wet in RF and see how he does there.

    Abe Almonte would be a much better candidate for left field – he’s a much better defender at this time.

    If they want to suck up Mesa’s K issues, he’s the best defender at the upper levels and would, IMO, immediately be the best defender in the OF is brought up.

  23. MG January 20th, 2013 at 10:10 am

    You will have to excuse me but I could care less about the Yankees ‘brand’ internationally or whether fans in Australia root for them.

    I’m a Yankees fan because of one thing-I was born and raised in New York City, they were my team of choice back when there were 3 in town, including the Dodgers-who played two miles from my home.

    No offense to any other LoHud’ers, but I see true Yankees fans as those of us who grew up in New York, we don’t need anyone else as fans but of course welcome you to the fold.

    I’ve lived in other places in the U.S., including a few blocks from PacBell (now AT&T) Park and would never even consider changing my allegiance, it will be the Yankees for the rest of my life.

  24. J. Alfred Prufrock January 20th, 2013 at 10:11 am

    *if brought up.

  25. randy l. January 20th, 2013 at 10:13 am

    “The Yankees didn’t “miss the boat” on out of market revenue.”

    86w183-

    how do you figure?

    i’m on cape cod. to watch the yankees i pay mlb.com for streaming video or comcast cable for the mlb package.

    all i really want is a direct signal to yankee games. there is no direct signal to yankee games.

    therefore, i watch yankee games and the yankees get 1/30th of my money.

    that’s crazy.

  26. MG January 20th, 2013 at 10:13 am

    ‘New York’ in my prior post means the NYC metro area, I don’t want to piss off my NJ friends or I could wind up next to Jimmy Hoffa under the MetLife Stadium parking lot…

  27. randy l. January 20th, 2013 at 10:19 am

    86w183-

    i knew a guy who worked on the mlb.com in it’s conceptual phase. he was one of those McKinsey kid consultants. he told me about it at the time. i checked it out , but it was hard to watch. now it’s amazing.

    i don’t think hank and hal had any idea what they were giving away with mlb.com.

    i think they blew it.

    maybe not like kodak with digital photography, but i think the yankees are stuck in an old pre internet business model. the word dinosaur comes to mind.

  28. pat January 20th, 2013 at 10:22 am

    jnorris427
    Huh. Thomas Neal’s twitter bio lists him as a member of the Yankees. @tdaddyneal

    jnorris427
    Neal, 25, was released by the Indians to make room for Nick Swisher. He’s had 24 MLB PAs, but he is right-handed. #yankees

  29. trisha - true pinstriped blue January 20th, 2013 at 10:24 am

    I was thinking I should turn in my Yankee card since I didn’t grow up in the NYC metro area. That truly makes me so much less a valid Yankee fan. But then I realized that the Yankees themselves truly appreciate having a fan base all over the country, and yes all over the world. So my card is safe for at least another year.

    :)

    Anthony – great job. Very insightful and very well written. I for one find it thrilling that you, far off in Australia, are one of us. I betcha the Yanks would feel the same way. And after all, they’re the ones who count, hey?

    ************

    Saw Argo and Thirty Dark Zero is still my hands-down favorite.

    Have a great day (night?) all!

  30. Shame Spencer January 20th, 2013 at 10:26 am

    MG January 20th, 2013 at 10:13 am

    ‘New York’ in my prior post means the NYC metro area, I don’t want to piss off my NJ friends or I could wind up next to Jimmy Hoffa under the MetLife Stadium parking lot…

    ———————-

    I appreciate that, MG ;)

    I understand the sentiment but also think there’s something interesting about international fans or those fans outside of the Metro area. I look at it a bit like I look at immigrants; I always felt like my friends that immigrated to the US were more American than I was in the sense that they chose to be and American while I just had the happy accident of being born here. For people literally on the other side of the world to chose to be Yankee fans is no small feat. I know there are people in Japan that wake up at 4am to watch their games daily. I know there are people in Europe that combat the mocking of their friends and families about the merits of their love of a sport they’ve never seen live in person. There’s a different relationship at play, but I do admire that people so far away chose to be Yankee fans.

  31. randy l. January 20th, 2013 at 10:28 am

    “No offense to any other LoHud’ers, but I see true Yankees fans as those of us who grew up in New York, we don’t need anyone else as fans but of course welcome you to the fold.”

    no offense to you mg, but there are probably more yankee potential customers ( that gets out of the real fan definition) outside the new york area than inside the new york area.

    this wasn’t the case in a world where people stayed where they grew up. the world has changed. if the yankees only try to sell things to you and not to me and potential customers like anthony, their days as a market leader are over.

  32. MG January 20th, 2013 at 10:39 am

    randy l. January 20th, 2013 at 10:28 am
    “No offense to any other LoHud’ers, but I see true Yankees fans as those of us who grew up in New York, we don’t need anyone else as fans but of course welcome you to the fold.”

    no offense to you mg, but there are probably more yankee potential customers ( that gets out of the real fan definition) outside the new york area than inside the new york area.

    this wasn’t the case in a world where people stayed where they grew up. the world has changed. if the yankees only try to sell things to you and not to me and potential customers like anthony, their days as a market leader are over.
    —————————
    randy, as I have said many times, I don’t care about baseball economics. I decided a long time ago to focus on the game on the field, not the peripheral issues, because it was detracting from my enjoyment of the games.

    I heard an interview with Mike Tirico the other day where he said exactly the same thing, that he has stopped thinking about the off the field issues and just focused on the game that was in front of him. I found it both interesting and refreshing that someone who makes his living broadcasting sports on a major network would feel the same way as a fan like myself.

  33. Giuseppe Franco January 20th, 2013 at 10:40 am

    I must not be a true Yankee fan either since I’ve lived my entire life in the Chicagoland area.

    I was a Mattingly fan first in the mid 80s but the quickly team grew on me and have been a diehard ever since.

  34. DONNYBROOK January 20th, 2013 at 10:47 am

    You wimps that consider yourselves “true Yankee fans”, simply because you grew up in New York, are actually the Weakest of Any Yankee Fans in the World. It’s easy to be a fan of a MLB team that is right in your own back yard. Try being a Yankee Fan in the 60′s, and living in SoCal. NO Cable TV, NO satellite TV, NO coverage of Any MLB team, other than the Dodgers or Angels. Well, maybe a little Giants when the Dodgers would play them, and Marichal would rat-a-tat-tat Roseboro, or Drysdale once again knock down Mays. Following the Yankees in SoCal back then, forced a true Yankee Fan to go Sherlock Holmes for Yankee game scores, or Any info on the team or a Yankee player in general. You had to truly be a Yankee Fan back then to follow the team. You wienees living in New York got it easy when it comes to following and rooting for the Yanks. Stop patting yourselves on the back, and realize that you actually got it easy.

  35. austinmac January 20th, 2013 at 10:49 am

    Born in New York but spent my life elsewhere. When you pulled for the Yankees in the late 60s like me, you qualify as a fan. Let’s not be chauvinistic.

  36. randy l. January 20th, 2013 at 10:49 am

    “randy, as I have said many times, I don’t care about baseball economics. I decided a long time ago to focus on the game on the field, not the peripheral issues, because it was detracting from my enjoyment of the games”

    mg-

    i can’t argue against that as a personal preference. i agree the business of baseball is a totally different thing, but at the same time intertwined with what happens on the field.

    even factoring in the preference to pay attention to on field only baseball surely you’ll be wondering WTF in 2014 if robinson cano is playing second base for the dodgers.

    i do understand the game itself on the field is the whole point of being a fan of it, however it’s hard for me to not see that something is happening at a business level that is affecting what we see on the field.

  37. MG January 20th, 2013 at 10:58 am

    randy, eventually baseball will go the exact same way as all of the other sports, with something very close to a salary cap, and parity will be the name of the game.

    At that point in time the Yankees will be on a level playing field with everyone else regarding player salaries. I just see no reason to worry about it because it’s a certainty, whether it be 1 year, 5 years, or 10.

    I am still a football Giants fan in spite of the salary cap (same with Knicks and Rangers) and have grown to appreciate the teams on the field and to also appreciate the seasons where they contend or win it all.

    Dynasties are few and far between in any sport, demanding or expecting it from your team is just a means for being disappointed on a regular basis.

    It’s one thing to be demanding of yourself in your real life, to have expectations and goals for yourself that can be somewhat controlled. To have those same demands of your teams just doesn’t make that much sense to me, but that’s just me.

  38. FiretheUMPIRE January 20th, 2013 at 11:02 am

    I was born and raised in the New York Metropolitan area and proud of it Donnybrook.

  39. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 11:04 am

    Randy-

    You run a buisness. That gives you a unique perspective and an insight into what it takes to be successful at running it.

    I think the phrase “adapt or die” would be appropriate ?

    Doesn’t matter if it’s a huge one like the Yankees or a small Mom and Pop one like Tom’s.

    I’ve always admired the courage and self-confidence it takes to run your own buisness.

    I’ve always taken the cowardly way out and just accepted a paycheck from an Employer.

    ;)

  40. Travelbug83 January 20th, 2013 at 11:09 am

    “No offense to any other LoHud’ers, but I see true Yankees fans as those of us who grew up in New York, we don’t need anyone else as fans but of course welcome you to the fold.”

    Excuse me? First off, I feel offended. So cut the ‘no offense’ stuff.
    I don’t even know where to start with this one. From a team perspective, just financially the Yankees will greatly disagree with you here. Do you seriously think the fans in the NYC Metro Area alone could get the Yankees enough revenue to be so filthy rich and be who they are? Without people travelling to NYC from all over the world the stadium would not be nearly as full as it is every single day and they would probably not sell half the merchandise.
    Yankee players themselves (think about Granderson and his yearly trips to some foreigh place, or now former Yankee Dickerson who went to Europe last November to name only two) reach out to international baseball fans to bring the sport to those who were not born in the US and may not be able to ever see a baseball game live or meet their stars. Luckily they care about the fans that are not originally from NY and don’t go by “We don’t need them”
    BY the logic displayed by MG international fans.. or even fans in states like Nebraska or Montana can’t be real fans of any MLB baseball team because their city doesn’t have a club. Something that would hurt baseball greatly since it would limit the fanbase considerably.

    Now from a more personal perspective. I was born and raised in Germany where baseball is practically non-existant. I didn’t know anything about it until my mid twenties when I was introduced to it by a (Canadian) Yankee fan. I immediately fell in love with the game and because I was learning the game by watching the Yankees play I also fell in love with that team. I got up at 1am in the night to watch Yankee games on my laptop, I flew all the way from Germany to NYC JUST to see the Yankees play. I bought their merchandise despite the ridiculous international shipping costs in the MLB official shops to show my love for baseball and the team publicly. I’ve since relocated to Seattle and while I follow the Mariners despite all the grief they give me, the Yankees are and always will be my number 1 team. Heck last year while returning from a business trip to Germany I made a detour through NY and since the Yankees had an off day, I drove out to Allentown to watch the Empire State Yankees play. I read books about the history I have missed and watch the old games when I get a chance to do so.
    Now I am being told I am not a real Yankees fan?
    It was pure co-incidence that I became a Yankees fan. Had my friend been a fan of the Angels, I might follow them now instead. But that doesn’t make me less of a fan. I live for this team and everytime they don’t win it all my heart breaks a little, just like that of any New Yorker.

  41. randy l. January 20th, 2013 at 11:14 am

    mg-

    again, i can’t argue against your personal preferences. i’ve gone in the other direction. as parity took over other pro sports, i stopped following pro football and pro basketball. today for instance it 48 degrees out and i’m going to go play golf,. i have no idea what’s on with either football or basketball or hockey.

    so i’m down to rooting for the yankees, but quite frankly i’m only half watching until they get a new ownership or management team in there.

    if baseball is now a parity sport , shouldn’t the yankees have a management that can keep up with managements like the rays ?

  42. randy l. January 20th, 2013 at 11:17 am

    “I’ve always taken the cowardly way out and just accepted a paycheck from an Employer.”

    mtu-

    i found out really young that i couldn’t get fired if i owned my own business.

    it wasn’t so much bravery as much as it was survival :)

  43. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 11:17 am

    “if baseball is now a parity sport , shouldn’t the yankees have a management that can keep up with managements like the rays ?”

    I hope Mg does not mind if I jump in on that one.

    Emphatic Yes !

    Not only keep up but surpass.

    ;)

  44. trisha - true pinstriped blue January 20th, 2013 at 11:19 am

    Travelbug83 – you rock!

    ***********

    I became a Yankee fan by dint of the fact that my mom was from NY and she and her family were always huge Yankee fans. Her family relocated but weren’t required to turn in their Yankee fan cards because they were no longer in the NYC metro area…

    I got taken to the Stadium by my godparents (mom’s sister and husband) and grandfather from a very young age.

    I actually think I deserve kudos for being a diehard and living in the backyard of Redsuxonia and putting up with their fans all the time.

    I envy fans in the Metro area but only because it’s easier for them to see games in person than it is for me. Other than that, we’re all the same.

  45. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 11:21 am

    Randy-

    Give yourself the credit you deserve.

    It also takes courage and initiative to be totally responsible for your own financial future.

    Because if you fail you starve, and you also go broke.

    Now go practice your swing. If GB were here he’d tell you it’s hopeless but I am an optimist.

    ;)

  46. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 11:24 am

    Trisha-

    You do get extra credit for being willing to wear your Yankee hat in the middle of enemy territory.

    It’s a good thing you love your siblings.

    :)

  47. Against All Odds January 20th, 2013 at 11:25 am

    Her family relocated but weren’t required to turn in their Yankee fan cards because they were no longer in the NYC metro area…

    Other than that, we’re all the same.

    —————————-

    The first line made me choke on my breakfast.

    The second line is very true.

  48. randy l. January 20th, 2013 at 11:25 am

    “Not only keep up but surpass.”

    mtu-

    isn’t the rays ownership and management form the NYC financial world?

    surely there are people in NYC who could come in and compete with similar tools that the tampa people have.

  49. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 11:28 am

    Randy-

    Without a doubt.

    ;)

  50. randy l. January 20th, 2013 at 11:29 am

    “It also takes courage and initiative to be totally responsible for your own financial future”

    mtu-

    being crazy helps too.

    but seriously, i’m totally unemployable, i’m what you cal extremely independent :)

  51. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 11:31 am

    Randy-

    We’re all a little bit crazy in our own way.

    Anyway, I’m glad you found you’re niche.

    :)

  52. J. Alfred Prufrock January 20th, 2013 at 11:34 am

    I find this “I’m a better fan than you are” as ridiculous now as it was when a certain segment of this board was accusing those who were/remain against the Montero trade and for excoriating Cashman/Girardi in general for subsequent failures to beef up the offense (Cespedes, etc.) as failing in their fandom.

    Nevertheless, this latest version of junior high type one-upmanship has brought out some interesting stories about how some of our fellow Lohudians came to be Yankee fans. I always find that personal fan history stuff interesting reading.

    The one thing I maintain is that not seeing the games live does often yield a limited perspective and therefore less information on where the flaws and strengths may lie in a given season.

  53. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 11:36 am

    JAP-

    “The one thing I maintain is that not seeing the games live does often yield a limited perspective and therefore less information on where the flaws and strengths may lie in a given season”

    There’s not much I can do about that living in Utah.

    :(

  54. trisha - true pinstriped blue January 20th, 2013 at 11:38 am

    “Trisha-

    You do get extra credit for being willing to wear your Yankee hat in the middle of enemy territory.

    It’s a good thing you love your siblings.
    :)

    MTU – my car has a deep gouge in it from being keyed one day when I was in Home Depot! I’m pretty sure it happened during the 2009 postseason. It sure isn’t because someone envied me my car – a 1997 Acura Integra! So it had to be my license-plate-holder that says NY Yankees. (I was told the scratch was so deep that it couldn’t be buffed out and I’d have to have the entire car repainted. A definite crime of passion!)

    With my siblings it’s always been gentle ribbing back and forth. Otherwise it could get real ugly!

    :D

  55. J. Alfred Prufrock January 20th, 2013 at 11:38 am

    IOW, an “old” team is even older live.

  56. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 11:41 am

    Trisha-

    It’s sad how malicious some folks can be.

    :(

  57. Travelbug83 January 20th, 2013 at 11:43 am

    Trisha – As MTU already pointed out. You DO deserve extra points for growing up in Red Sox country and still sticking up for the Yankees. Sorry about your car though :-/

    JAP – “The one thing I maintain is that not seeing the games live does often yield a limited perspective and therefore less information on where the flaws and strengths may lie in a given season.”
    How so? I watch at least 100 games every season. I’d guess it’s more around 120 – 130. With all those games on TV and on my laptop and the beauty of replay and slow motion, wouldn’t that give me an even better perspective than seeing games live minus the numerous close-ups and slow-mo’s? Just like Trisha though I wish I could go to the games instead and envy everyone who can.

  58. J. Alfred Prufrock January 20th, 2013 at 11:46 am

    MTU January 20th, 2013 at 11:36 am

    JAP-

    “The one thing I maintain is that not seeing the games live does often yield a limited perspective and therefore less information on where the flaws and strengths may lie in a given season”

    There’s not much I can do about that living in Utah.

    :(
    ///

    I just mean that you can’t be as philosophically dismissive about age and its attendant issues once you’ve seen it exposed in-time, against the bald expanse of the playing field.

    In 2005, we were pathetic as an OF, for example, and there’s nothing that drives that home more than watching OFers who can’t ever hope to get there try to chase down what some athleticism and youth would have rendered flyouts.

    I used to get into debates online about how old and slow we’d become. You also get people still saying that Damon was still a good CF when we got him: he was barely passable, and nothing pounded that reality like being there.

    You just don’t appreciate the relative distances, the jump that a guy didn’t or did get, the lack of batspeed of a hitter, say, vs. a guy who has it, the velocity of a pitcher – stuff like that.

    A seasoned observer will pick that up on television, but just so much more pronounced live.

  59. trisha - true pinstriped blue January 20th, 2013 at 11:47 am

    Against – :)

    *******************

    J Al, before I was able to watch all the games on television (don’t remember when MSG was part of DTV, etc., but I subscribed as soon as I heard about it), I was relegated to listening to the games on the radio, unless the Ys were playing the Sux or they were part of a national broadcast. You want to talk about limiting one’s perspective! You’re left to accept the broadcaster’s take on everything.

  60. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 11:51 am

    JAP-

    No debate on the desirability of the live scenario as an option.

    I was merely joking that it’s a rather long trip for someone like me.

    ;)

  61. yankee21 January 20th, 2013 at 11:51 am

    Interesting topic, interesting post.

    Long Island born and raised but have lived/worked around the world and without a doubt have followed NYY every step of the way since the early 80s.

    I appreciate the different perspective an AUS has for the team we follow.

  62. Travelbug83 January 20th, 2013 at 11:54 am

    JAP
    “You just don’t appreciate the relative distances, the jump that a guy didn’t or did get, the lack of batspeed of a hitter, say, vs. a guy who has it, the velocity of a pitcher – stuff like that.”

    I will agree on this one. When I first saw an MLB baseball stadium and the OF I literally murmured to myself “How do they ever get to any ball?” The TV doesn’t give you the right perspective about the size of a field or the speed of a pitch.

    I still think though that TV/Internet can give you other perspectives that you miss at live games. I guess having a good mix would be ideal.

    But that being said, Jones’ botched plays in the OF last year looked as awful on TV as they probably looked live ;)

  63. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 11:54 am

    Hey. The Pioneers thought they owned Utah because they settled it.

    Over time they kinda found out different.

    Many tribal people are kinda smart in that regard. They think no one actually “owns” anything.

    We all just get to rent it for a period of time.

    ;)

  64. J. Alfred Prufrock January 20th, 2013 at 11:55 am

    Travelbug, see my post to MTU at 11:46. It’s not that you can’t pick it up on broadcasts, especially if you can adapt what you know about the live game to the subjectivity of the camera, but being there means you can’t really rationalize weaknesses like the TV cameras allow you to, and you do really see naked skill, relative to space and time, that you just can’t get from a broadcast.

    For some of the intricacies, replays are of course going to shed better light. They do have replay monitors at the park, and I usually re-watch the game at home the next day, or on MLB-TV online, when I want to see something broken down compartmentally.

  65. yankee21 January 20th, 2013 at 11:56 am

    # Giuseppe Franco January 20th, 2013 at 10:40 am

    I must not be a true Yankee fan either since I’ve lived my entire life in the Chicagoland area.
    I was a Mattingly fan first in the mid 80s but the quickly team grew on me and have been a diehard ever since.

    Two favorite Yankees of all time that I have had the pleasure to follow;
    none other than Don Mattingly and Paul O’neill.

  66. J. Alfred Prufrock January 20th, 2013 at 11:58 am

    J Al, before I was able to watch all the games on television (don’t remember when MSG was part of DTV, etc., but I subscribed as soon as I heard about it), I was relegated to listening to the games on the radio, unless the Ys were playing the Sux or they were part of a national broadcast. You want to talk about limiting one’s perspective! You’re left to accept the broadcaster’s take on everything.
    ///

    Trisha, John Sterling has almost caused me to drive off the road at times. Accepting John’s view of baseball is dangerous in the extreme :)

  67. J. Alfred Prufrock January 20th, 2013 at 12:00 pm

    MTU January 20th, 2013 at 11:51 am

    JAP-

    No debate on the desirability of the live scenario as an option.

    I was merely joking that it’s a rather long trip for someone like me.

    ;)
    ///

    Yeah, I know. I’m not even talking about desirability so much as that live games, self-deception is nearly impossible!

  68. trisha - true pinstriped blue January 20th, 2013 at 12:04 pm

    Travelbug83, yeah it does bother me mostly because I love my little car and it still looks good and runs well. But what it would cost to have it painted isn’t worth it. And I couldn’t get the exact color paint anymore, so it wouldn’t feel like my car to me.

    And this is also a true story: (MTU – you talk about malicious; this person was stone-cold crazy!) I know I told the story here when it happened or pretty contemporaneously. It was also during the postseason and I was driving along the highway during the daytime, minding my own business, and I was in the far right-hand lane, getting ready to take an exit. Some AH came from out of nowhere and pulled up in the lane next to me and then swerved over into my lane and forced me off the road. Then he got off at the same exit I was taking and just went about his business. It wasn’t like he was in a hurry to get somewhere! I didn’t know the person – I got a good look at him – and all I was left to conclude was that he didn’t like my license-plate holder and was glowering because his team had already been drop-kicked by the Angels.

  69. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 12:04 pm

    Yesterday was the 1st time in about a week I was able to get out to to hike after being down with a combo cold/flu.

    It felt really good. So good in fact I think I’ll go and repeat it.

    I’ll catch you all later.

    ;)

  70. J. Alfred Prufrock January 20th, 2013 at 12:07 pm

    I will agree on this one. When I first saw an MLB baseball stadium and the OF I literally murmured to myself “How do they ever get to any ball?” The TV doesn’t give you the right perspective about the size of a field or the speed of a pitch.

    I still think though that TV/Internet can give you other perspectives that you miss at live games. I guess having a good mix would be ideal.

    But that being said, Jones’ botched plays in the OF last year looked as awful on TV as they probably looked live ;)
    ///

    Travel, I gave up my seasons of over 30-plus seasons once the Montero trade was made.

    Last year, I went to the least amount of home games I’ve ever attended, probably since I could walk, and even that’s debatable, since I was carried in and out of the Stadium in my pre-ambulatory, pre-linguistic days on earth.

    I saw more Trenton and AAA games last year than I did Yankee home games.

    This year, I’ll attend more, because Jeter/Mo/Andy even closer to the finish line, and who knows, this may be it for Cano in pinstripes, as well as Joba/Hughes, whose exits I will take hard.

    Yep, I think watching live and then being able to get more granular on video replays and rewind gives you the best of all worlds.

    It’s too bad Jones didn’t take better care of himself. He’s probably the greatest CF I’ve ever seen. As for the disclosure of his domestic abuse, that is rather unbelievable and acutely disappointing in itself – but especially in light of his charity work against domestic violence. smh

  71. trisha - true pinstriped blue January 20th, 2013 at 12:07 pm

    J Al – I think it was the Sterling-Kay combination in those days. Can you imagine being struck with that???

  72. MTU January 20th, 2013 at 12:09 pm

    Trisha-

    That’s frickin’ unbelieveable.

    I’m glad you were not injured.

    Were you able to press charges after the fact ? Did anyone esle see what happened ?

    If things are that crazy in your neck of the woods perhaps you should be carrying a “roscoe”.

    Damn.

    :(

  73. mick January 20th, 2013 at 12:10 pm

    The Yanks as we know them are comprised of 3 different entities.
    Our fathers Yanks, who never lost.
    The post 64 Yanks, who never won.
    The now Yanks, who have become the 90′s Braves.
    To think of this team as a dynasty is delusional.
    What they have become is a perennial PS team.
    If this is good enough, then fear Hal, as he appears to have closed the wallet, at least for now.
    OTOH it could be looked at as bold as he appears to be trusting the Farm, something many have pined for for years.
    To guarantee failure in the future is just as ludicrous as seeing the Yanks as a perennial Dynasty, as that has been dead for years.
    In this age of parity to expect a title every year is self defeating and for some will cause a jump off the bandwagon.
    Remaining competitive is what we have become and might be where we are headed. JMO.
    Only time will tell.

  74. J. Alfred Prufrock January 20th, 2013 at 12:12 pm

    trisha – true pinstriped blue January 20th, 2013 at 12:07 pm

    J Al – I think it was the Sterling-Kay combination in those days. Can you imagine being struck with that???
    ///

    Unfortunately, I don’t have to imagine it. I’ve had to pop out to somewhere now and then in the car and have had to rely on the radio. I just enter that situation with my eyes open (unlike Sterling) and expect to barely know what is actually going on on the field :D.

  75. trisha - true pinstriped blue January 20th, 2013 at 12:17 pm

    MTU – to tell you the truth, it happened so quickly that the only thing I remember distinctly was the feeling of my heart pounding out of my chest! I never got a plate or anything like that. I did try to catch up to the guy, mainly to ask what the hell that was all about, but he quickly lost me and so I gave up the chase.

  76. blake January 20th, 2013 at 12:25 pm

    “No offense to any other LoHud’ers, but I see true Yankees fans as those of us who grew up in New York, we don’t need anyone else as fans but of course welcome you to the fold.”

    I guess Im not a true fan either….a bit surprised at you MG for a comment like that

  77. mick January 20th, 2013 at 12:26 pm

    To hear the gloating here pertaining to the Montero “promotion” is predictable yet potentially so wrong.

  78. austinmac January 20th, 2013 at 1:18 pm

    Randy,

    I started at a huge law firm, but when I saw the 40 year old partners get anxious when the head partner walked down the hall I knew I was outta there. I’d rather sink or swim by my own devices, and I am a great boss.

  79. tomingeorgia January 20th, 2013 at 1:20 pm

    Mister mick,
    I guess you told them!

    Anybody know the line on the Falcons Niners game? I’m looking for a big game from Tony Gonzalez.

  80. Ys Guy January 20th, 2013 at 1:31 pm

    the Yankees transcent New York. This New Yorker welcomes all Yankees fans!

  81. Tar January 20th, 2013 at 1:33 pm

    Anthony great post.

    One thing I would like to add is there is not only a battle for the international fan, (Ichiro is a great example), but there is an internal N Y battle for the next generation of baseball fans.

    Don’t laugh, I remember coaching little league in the 80′s and that was a by far a Mets generation of kids. Since Jeter, the Yankees have trounced the Muts, but IMO the Yankees are extremely vulnerable right now. Hal seems intent on giving the Mets 189 more chances. So far he’s lucky they been so inept. This would have been totally unacceptable to the Boss.

  82. Ys Guy January 20th, 2013 at 1:37 pm

    tar, the total ineptitude of the late 80′s yankees teams were ‘the boss’s fault and his second supension was the only reason the Yankees restored order in the Big Apple.

  83. Nick in SF January 20th, 2013 at 1:38 pm

    But when it was totally unacceptable to the Boss in the 80′s he just made things worse and worse. Then he got suspended. Then things got better and better.

    Niners -5.

  84. grouchonyy January 20th, 2013 at 1:38 pm

    To limit Yankee fandom to the NYC metro area is silly. (I am a born and bred NewYorker who has always lived in the area.) When I travel to see Yankees games out of town, I am always amazed at the amount of Yankees fans are in the park. Some are expats and travelers but many are fans that live locally. Try getting Yankees tickets to out of town games. It’s not that easy. Sure Yankees fans travel well but a lot of that traveling includes fans coming to the nearest park to their home (for example, Yankee fans in N. Dak. going to Minneapolis).
    ***
    I’m still hoping that this 2014 business is a one time reset only, but if not, Hal will be reminded of the empty seats that allowed his father to buy the team at fire sale prices. Perhaps he’s getting ready to sell and maximizing current profits. I don’t want to see the late 60′s and late 80′s again.

  85. Ys Guy January 20th, 2013 at 1:42 pm

    you owe me a beer nick! :)

  86. Nick in SF January 20th, 2013 at 1:44 pm

    Yeah, but you didn’t provide the football line.

  87. Tar January 20th, 2013 at 1:46 pm

    I agree about the early boss being inept, bumbling fool. Pretty much hated the man in that era.

    But in his defense I think he learned from his mistakes. I know I came to appreciate him as an owner who above all else wanted to win. And he especially wanted to win the battle of NY.

    And say what you will about the Yankees at that time, but the Mets were fun to watch. They kicked the Yankees butt when it came to gaining the young fans.

  88. Nick in SF January 20th, 2013 at 1:54 pm

    I think this is relevant to the point of the very-well-done guest post (nice work, Anthony!), but it’s not just stars that drives the Yanks’ global popularity and brand dominance: it’s winning.

    And winning, in turn, helps propel the very good and excellent player into stardom.

  89. randy l. January 20th, 2013 at 1:56 pm

    austin mac-

    when you are in control of your own business it gives you a different perspective on other businesses.
    you and i know how much choice hal has in how he makes business decisions. it’s not like it’s a corporation where he has to answer to shareholders. hal is simply taking a very safe path in his mind that makes sense to him , but it really doesn’t because he’s in the entertainment business.

    a lot of us are simply not entertained by what he’s doing with the team. i think it’s going to cost the yankees bottom line as time goes on because it’s going to be a dull product. i don’t think hal has an entrepreneurial bone in his body, so i’m hoping that the steinbrenners are taking the approach they are with the idea of selling the team.

  90. Nick in SF January 20th, 2013 at 1:58 pm

    Tar, he certainly mellowed and learned to trust his employees more, but he didn’t completely reform his ways. He still wanted to go out and get Giambi, Sheffield, Randy Johnson when those might not have been the best moves.

    But yeah, he wanted to win on the field and on the back page.

  91. austinmac January 20th, 2013 at 1:58 pm

    The Yankees are lucky the Mets are inept. It wasn’t do long ago they were the more popular.

    Hal, you do not want to let that happen.

  92. Tar January 20th, 2013 at 1:58 pm

    “And winning, in turn, helps propel the very good and excellent player into stardom.”

    More likely vice versa.

  93. yanks61 January 20th, 2013 at 1:58 pm

    Austinmac, if you’re still around, I’m glad that you took me up on the recommenadation to read “Lefty” – and I’m glad you liked it.

    ——————————————————————–

    When I think back about the Boss, I think of the ridiculous things he did that made me laugh, the charitable things he did which warmed my heart and the stupid things he did again and again, especially in the 80′s. Read Maddon and Klein’s “Damn Yankees” (in fact just read the chapter headings where they list all the incredible turmoil and idiotic moves being made in those years)

    ——————————————————————–

    Stan the Man was one of a kind. I saw him hit three homers in a doubleheader against the Mets at the Polo Grounds – and he was 41 or 42 when he did that (of course the rightfield stands in Polo Grounds was just a little close.)

    And Musial got that nick name from Dodger fans. He killed the Bums at Ebbets Field. So when he was coming to bat, Dodger fans would moan, “Oh no, here comes that Man again!” And thus he became Stan the Man.

  94. randy l. January 20th, 2013 at 2:02 pm

    “To hear the gloating here pertaining to the Montero “promotion” is predictable yet potentially so wrong.”

    mick-

    talk about being a dollar short and a day late.

    i could rev up being smug again for you if you want about the mariners basically giving the starting catcher job to montero :)

  95. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 2:07 pm

    Best to Stan the man. I’m a yankees fan too, ‘cept when the Jays are a playing! :D

  96. Tar January 20th, 2013 at 2:07 pm

    And for all the stupid Steinbrenner miscues, his team won 7 world Series titles! Only the Reds won 3 in that time. He must have done something right.

  97. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 2:09 pm

    Yanks61, nice to see you around, thanks for the input!

  98. Nick in SF January 20th, 2013 at 2:10 pm

    “More likely vice versa.”

    If you want to play chicken & egg, sure. There are plenty of examples of it working both ways.

    But yes, certain players will be stars wherever they go and under certain circumstances they can help turn a team into a winning team, and having stars on the Yankees helps with both the winning and with the brand dominance.

    I’d say winning with the Yankees helped turn Tino Martinez into a bigger star (and his play helped them win) but then he was replaced with a bigger star and the team didn’t win a title again until that bigger star departed (to grossly oversimplify).

  99. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 2:12 pm

    George certainly was a paradox, full of Pandoras’s box!

  100. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 2:13 pm

    Nick, sometimes I don’t know where you are driving, mon ami! :)

  101. Nick in SF January 20th, 2013 at 2:15 pm

    “And for all the stupid Steinbrenner miscues, his team won 7 world Series titles! Only the Reds won 3 in that time. He must have done something right.”

    Absolutely! He also presided over the longest playoff drought in post-1919 Yankee history, no?

    And, not to be too repetitive, but both of his WS runs (’77-’78 and ’96-’00) came after his two suspensions. He was still alive in 2009 but the kids were more in charge; it was they who were responsible for some of the decisions that made ’09 possible.

  102. Tar January 20th, 2013 at 2:18 pm

    Nick

    Yes I agree the boss took things to an extreme. But pretty much my point on Steinbrenner was how much he wanted to win the back pages, with the use of “star power”. He seems to have developed a very successful model. One that could have been refined yes, but not just tossed out the “189″ window.

    Hal seems to think he knows a better way.

  103. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 2:21 pm

    Thank god George didn’t want Winfield!

  104. Nick in SF January 20th, 2013 at 2:23 pm

    Oh, I didn’t get that this was about critiquing the sons for the future Yankeepocalypse.

    Hal may seem to think he knows a better way and we seem to think we know better than Hal.

  105. disco stu January 20th, 2013 at 2:26 pm

    “The Yanks as we know them are comprised of 3 different entities.
    Our fathers Yanks, who never lost.
    The post 64 Yanks, who never won.
    The now Yanks, who have become the 90?s Braves.”

    Mick ~ I respectfully disagree.

    If you are saying that the post ’64 Yankees never won and that era ran thru 1975, then you are correct … but I dont get the sense that you are saying that and I believe you are lumping the Yankees from post ’64 until they became winners again during these past 15 years.

    If so, you simply can’t ignore the fact that from ’76 thru ’81 the Yankees were in the PS 5 times, won 4 pennants, and 2 WS. For anyone, like myself, who was around during that time, it was a great and rewarding time to be a Yankee fan. They were THE best team in baseball during this period.

    Now they certainly didnt do much after ’81 (very true) until ’94 when the gravy train came around again. I’ll give you that.

    But again, if you are lumping the last 15 years or so as one enormous period of Yankee history, I dont see how you can categorize them as being like the Braves were. They have won 5 WS championships, including 4 in 5 years and 3 in a row – and were 2 outs away from making it 4 in a row. Let’s get real.

    The Yankees WERE a dynasty (in every sense of the word) from ’96 thru ’01 (I would even stretch it thru ’03 because they won over 100 games in both ’02 and ’03 and went to the WS in ’03 in dramatic fashion, even though they lost and did so with a core that was part of all that previous, prolific winning).

    If you want to say the Yankees from ’04 thru ’12 are like the ’90′s Braves, because of just one WS title and a bunch of PS disappointments, I would agree.

    But if you want to get technical, the Yankees had a mini dynasty in the ’70′s and a dynasty for the ages in the ’90′s that included one of the greatest single seasons of all time.

    So you either need to have these 2 periods of extended winning set aside as separate periods to fit your arguement or you need to revise how you are encapsulating these 3 Yankee “entities”.

  106. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 2:30 pm

    The Yanks are the Montreal Canadians of baseball.

  107. Nick in SF January 20th, 2013 at 2:32 pm

    And Tar, so I’m not misunderstood, I am not endorsing Hal’s ownership reign or philosophy. For me it’s too soon to give a verdict just like the Boss’ reign looked different in 1990 then it did in 1980 and different still in 2000.

    Things sure started off well with the 2009 title and #cheaphal wasn’t a twitter megatrend then. We’ll see how justified it ends up being in 2014 and beyond.

    I will agree with you that the Boss’ passion for winning is preferable in an owner and there aren’t any serious positive signs that the current regime shares it, but few owners do. I just hope they recognize (or learn) that winning is the key component to keeping the Yankees on top and firming up the bottom line.

  108. Nick in SF January 20th, 2013 at 2:36 pm

    disco stu, agree with you on different Yankee eras.

    To that point, we’re a little unfair to the Yankee teams of 2001 onward in that we sometimes judge them based on whether they won the WS or not.

    We should remember that we’re in the Wild Card era now and it’s harder to make it through the postseason than it was in eras past.

  109. Tar January 20th, 2013 at 2:37 pm

    “He also presided over the longest playoff drought in post-1919 Yankee history, no?”

    Why 1919? Were they not formed 1903? :D

    “Oh, I didn’t get that this was about critiquing the sons for the future Yankeepocalypse.”

    Was Anthony’s post not a critique on Hal and his frugal ways?

  110. Tar January 20th, 2013 at 2:40 pm

    Nick@ 2:32

    YES :D

  111. mick January 20th, 2013 at 2:40 pm

    If you are saying that the post ’64 Yankees never won and that era ran thru 1975, then you are correct …
    ===========
    disco stu-

    Indeed you are correct as was I.
    This current dynasty you refer to was nothing though, compared to our fathers Dynasty, capital D.
    Albeit there are many more layers to a championship now with the playoff system, but the true Dynasty began with Ruth and ended with Mantle.

  112. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 2:44 pm

    Mick, you had a true dynasty I the late nineties – almost five in a row!

  113. mick January 20th, 2013 at 2:48 pm

    talk about being a dollar short and a day late.

    i could rev up being smug again for you if you want about the mariners basically giving the starting catcher job to montero
    =========================
    randy-
    just for your satisfaction, you get the credit for my remark, as yesterdays posts by you were, as predicted, annointing Montero the starting job…..basically, as you say.
    basically means even you aren’t convinced of anything yet, other than your prognostications for the chosen one…as you know trades usually aren’t judged for years after the fact.

  114. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 2:51 pm

    Mick, true, the Jays gave up Karsay for Henderson, and I’m so glad they did, although I’m sorry Karsay got hurt. I’m also happy about Kent for, Cone.

  115. mick January 20th, 2013 at 2:54 pm

    check out 1936-1964 @ http://www.baseball-reference.com/teams/NYY/…that is a Dynasty

  116. Nick in SF January 20th, 2013 at 2:55 pm

    Why 1919? Babe Ruth. There are three Yankee eras, after all: pre-Babe, Babe, and post-Babe.

    And yes, you’re right, he is critiquing what he thinks is going to happen re; Hal and 189, and I should have had a second cup of coffee before snarking out at you. Apologies. I’m just bummed out because Yo La Tengo played a free instore at Amoeba Records in SF yesterday and I couldn’t go because of a work commitment. I might have to overcompensate and go see them in Lisbon or Madrid.

    Anyway, the line has moved from Niners -5 to -4.5. As obnoxious as this town gets when the Niners are winning, I have to back them today. Double apologies to great Cal Bears Tony Gonzalez and Thomas DeCoud.

  117. UnKnown January 20th, 2013 at 3:00 pm

    J Al – I agree with your take about watching a Yankee game live vs on TV. I always try to get to see at least 6 to 10 games a year. After I finish watching a series live I feel so much more in tune on what is really going on with the club. It’s pretty amazing actually.

  118. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 3:04 pm

    Its going to be a fun year, and at least my Jays aren’t presently considered doormats; I don’t like that much, makes me look like a teeny weeny.

  119. yanks61 January 20th, 2013 at 3:07 pm

    Thanks, Nick. You took the words right out of my mouth!

    Yeah, Tar, I was specificaaly talking about the 80′s Boss. I was as thrilled as anyone with Stein’s earlier moves in the 70′s. The later Stein became a different kind of Stein who put his nose into baseball matters about which he really knew very little. Again, we can thank Michael for the renewed success that started in the mid-nineties:

    “In 1990, he ( Michael) was made general manager of the Yankees, during this time he built the Yankees farm system and laid the seeds for their dominance in the end of the decade. This was facilitated in part by the suspension of Yankees owner George Steinbrenner, who had earned a reputation as a meddler. The Yankees also began building young talent, rather than trading it away, as they had done in the 1980s with little success. During Michael’s tenure as general manager, the Yankees drafted or signed such notable players as Mariano Rivera, Andy Pettitte, Derek Jeter, Jorge Posada, and others. Further, he traded popular prospect Roberto Kelly for Paul O’Neill, whose fiery persona and play would become a cornerstone for the team. This foundation paid off with Yankee championships in 1996, and from 1998–2000.”

    Tar, when you’ve read “Damned Yankees” you’ll be shocked at all of the ridiculous, impetuous things Stein did in those years and you’ve probably forgotten. And I mean really shocked!

    So, yes, I loved the Boss for his bucks, but his input in the 80′s probably caused the Yankees a pennant and maybe a WS or two.

    ——————————————————————-

    Hi Jmills – hope you’re doing well. About five inches of snow here in the Loire Valley today. Very unusual for us but a little dusting for you guys there in “the north country far” (thank you, Bob – though I know you wrote that for Minnesota!)

  120. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 3:16 pm

    Hi back, Yanks61. Our snow on the ground dissipated with the rain the other day. What do I care, I’ve got a turbo charged 4WD Subaru!

  121. Rich in NJ January 20th, 2013 at 3:17 pm

    When we were kids, the Yankees were “just” a baseball team; now they are run like an global empire. it seems as if they are forgetting that almost everything about the brand rests on whether or not there are compelling stories to tell about what happens on the field. Those stores have more force if fans get to watch players develop over time in the same uniform, and are not merely rotisserie baseball entities who migrate here for big bucks in their 30s.

    At this point, most of the stories to be told are based on legacies that flow from guys who have been in the game for well over a decade.

    They need new narratives, and no amount of bean counting and profit and loss statements will ever obscure that.

  122. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 3:22 pm

    Rich, you wax, poetics.

  123. yanks61 January 20th, 2013 at 3:27 pm

    specificaaly – specifically; I’m one of those who went to the GB school of typing.

    ——————————————————————-

    jmills, that Suburu will get you around, alright. But it was kind of funny to see all these folks struting their stuff today with their 4 wd. We get a snowfall like this about every five years or so on average. I don’t know what they need it for during those other years, LOL!

    Anyway, everybody have a great rest of the day.

  124. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 3:31 pm

    Yanks61, you have yourself a Tom Terrific amazing one! In the words of Doug and Bob MacKenzie ( with Geddy Lee’s help ) – ” take off to the great white North, its a beauty way to go! “

  125. austinmac January 20th, 2013 at 3:41 pm

    For the afternoon crowd, at the recommendation of one of you members, I read Lefty:An American Odyssey. It is a wonderful book about a wonderful pitcher and man. I highly recommend it.

  126. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 3:47 pm

    Austin, – I’ll look it up – 361 or so Warren Sphan?

  127. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 3:51 pm

    Or are we talking about, Whitey Ford ?; I get my southpaws mixed up!

  128. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 4:00 pm

    Maybe this book is about Steve Carlton and his 27 wins in the early seventies.

  129. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 4:03 pm

    Lefty Grove?

  130. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 4:07 pm

    Mr.Perfect, David Wells? :D

  131. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 4:08 pm

    A lefty legend, Sir Jimmy Key!!!

  132. jmills January 20th, 2013 at 4:43 pm

    U people are so lucky Pat Gillick didn’t want to retain Key for the asking price of 4 years. I was all for Jimmy rather than Dave Stewart.

  133. Jorge Mexico January 21st, 2013 at 12:53 am

    To think that true Yankees fans are only those who were born and grew up in the NYC metro area is one of the most stupid things I’ve heard in my life. I couldn’t agree more with Trisha and Travelbug83, just to name a pair of true Yankees fans, just like me.
    I was born, I grew up and I still live in Mérida, Yucatán, México, and I can assure you that I’m a true Yankees fan. Everyone around me (family, friends, etc) consider me the same.
    I’ve been fortunate enough to fly to NY just to go to the last season of Yankee Stadium (2008) and to the first season of the new YS (2009). I’ve gone some times to Yankee games at Tropicana Filed, since it’s easier for me to fly to Florida than to NY. When my wife and me celebrated our 25th wedding anniversary, we took a cruise to Alaska, but we made it coincide with a Yankees game in Seattle. One of the best moments in my life, baseball related, was when I went to all 3 games in Miami of the 2003 World Series, when the Yankees faced the Marlins.
    I’ve got a lot of Yankees merchandise (jerseys, t-shirts, Yankeeographies, DVD’s, books, mugs, etc). I’ve been a fan since mid 70′s. So, when someone despises all Yankees fans outside NYC metro area, who are by far, but really far, the vast majority of Yankees fans, I can only say, like I said lines above, this is one of the most stupid things I’ve ever heard in my life

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