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A New York Yankees blog by Chad Jennings and the staff of The Journal News


Sometimes the good guys actually do win

Posted by: Chad Jennings - Posted in Misc on Jan 31, 2013 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

In retrospect, here’s one thing I find interesting about this morning’s Pinch Hitter post: I makes no mention of steroids, but it does mention two players who have admitted to using them.

Alex Rodriguez (“fans tend to feel disdain toward the third baseman”) and Andy Pettitte (“universally adored”) received very different reviews in Sean’s post, which — it’s worth mentioning — was written several days before the latest Rodriguez allegations. Why the difference of perception? I can’t say for certain, but I suspect it has more to do with at-the-stadium personality than off-the-field antics.

Right or wrong, Pettitte’s PED apology seemed genuine; a good man made a bad decision. Rodriguez’s felt phony; a bad guy was sorry he got caught.

Truth is that baseball fans are willing to forgive a lot. I wrote yesterday that baseball loves a hero, and that’s absolutely true. The game doesn’t look for villains, it looks for any reason to avoid them. It wants a reason to believe the best in someone. As long as a player shows up every day, plays hard, plays well and doesn’t come across as a jerk, he’s eligible to be a fan favorite.

He doesn’t have to win a championship. Don Mattingly never did.

He doesn’t have to live a regular guy lifestyle. Derek Jeter never has.

He doesn’t have to keep his emotions in check. Paul O’Neill never could.

What makes a fan favorite is the same thing that makes a good friend or a good co-worker or a good neighbor: Just be a good guy, or at least appear to be a good guy.  

Maybe the reputations of Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle would have been different with today’s media scrutiny, but I don’t think it would be because of their actions, I think it would depend on their reactions. If they were to smile at the cameras and play hard despite the attention, their reputations would have been magnified if anything. If they were to turn surly and disinterested, their legacies would have taken an immeasurable hit.

Pettitte’s admission of steroid use might wipe out any chance of him getting into the Hall of Fame, but it hasn’t significantly altered his status as a fan favorite. There was disappointment, for sure, but demeanor carried more weight. It always does.

Associated Press photo

 
 

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66 Responses to “Sometimes the good guys actually do win”

  1. Rich in NJ January 31st, 2013 at 10:03 pm

    I have always wondered if A-Rod would have been treated differently if he had been a lifelong Yankee.

  2. Chip January 31st, 2013 at 10:12 pm

    Rich,

    Alex would have been treated differently if hadn’t done that stupid GQ spread all those years ago.

    From the time where he and Derek allegedly had their tiff – there was no way he was going to be embraced by a faction of the Yankee fanbase (the knuckleheads who think they are actually part of the team)

    I always felt bad about that – but the rest of this stuff he has brought on himself.

    Andy has actually done more to screw with the Yankees than Alex has – between making them dangle on whether he wanted to pitch or not – but he “awe shucks’s” his way through it. Do I buy that he only used HGH once and it was to get back on the field and help the team? Not really – but he’s never been mentioned again and so I give him the benefit of the doubt.

    Alex on the other hand just keeps compounding his stupidity and making himself less and less likable – doing things like taking steroids while working with the Taylor Hooton Foundation…

  3. Rich in NJ January 31st, 2013 at 10:20 pm

    Chip

    Maybe, but if he had been here earlier he would have had a reservoir of good will, and he would have had no reason to be jealous of Jeter, because he would have been part of the championship legacy, probably an integral part.

    Jeter is a a very rare individual. Obviously, he has been lucky in that his parents seem terrific, and that almost certainly paid off, but that aside, he strikes me as a guy who could have been anything he wanted, in any field.

    A-Rod, otoh, while not blessed with that type of upbringing, is lucky he has all-world hand-eye coordination.

  4. Chip January 31st, 2013 at 10:26 pm

    Rich,

    It’s interesting when you compare Alex and Bonds. In Barry’s case, no matter what steroid claims were made against him, no matter how bad it got nationally for him, he was loved in San Francisco. The fans there defended him, cheered for him – loved him.

    Here, for Alex, no shot of that happening. He could come off the DL and hit five straight HRs and then strike out to end a game and he’ll be booed without mercy.

  5. Chip January 31st, 2013 at 10:27 pm

    I think the difference is that Bonds embraced the fact that no one liked him whereas Alex is still trying to get everyone to love him.

  6. RMS January 31st, 2013 at 10:28 pm

    repost

    Alex had like the best 3B OPS in the AL before he got hurt

    —————————————————————————————————–
    Key words-before he got hurt. Now he has had surgery on both hips and is old. He probably will never be the same and is owed big bucks. And will be a big distraction. And took PEDs. What team wants that.
    He will be booed like never before when he is puts on the Yankee uniform. I think Yankee fans have had enough of him.

  7. Rich in NJ January 31st, 2013 at 10:30 pm

    Chip

    Is that all on A-Rod or is it at least partially on the fans? I don’t really have a strong opinion, but I suspect that both bear responsibility.

  8. Tar January 31st, 2013 at 10:39 pm

    “Pettitte’s admission of steroid use might wipe out any chance of him getting into the Hall of Fame”

    Dumb question but I thought HGH and Steroids were not the same thing? It’s seems both terms are are used in a way that they are interchangeable. Chad is certainly not the first to write or say Andy using steroids.

  9. UpState January 31st, 2013 at 10:41 pm

    “…Truth is that baseball fans are willing to forgive a lot. I wrote yesterday that baseball loves a hero, and that’s absolutely true. The game doesn’t look for villains, it looks for any reason to avoid them. It wants a reason to believe the best in someone. As long as a player shows up every day, plays hard, plays well and doesn’t come across as a jerk, he’s eligible to be a fan favorite.

    He doesn’t have to win a championship. Don Mattingly never did.

    He doesn’t have to live a regular guy lifestyle. Derek Jeter never has…”

    He doesn’t have to keep his emotions in check. Paul O’Neill never could.

    —- Thank you, Chad, thank you.

  10. Nick in SF January 31st, 2013 at 10:42 pm

    Sorry, Chad, but your post’s title isn’t as timely as:

    “Sometimes the bad guys come out on top
    sometimes the good guys lose”

    — Yo La Tengo, playing RIGHT NOW at the Pageant in St. Louis. Wish I was there. :(

  11. DaSaint007 January 31st, 2013 at 10:42 pm

    I always thought it was the perceived competition between two of the three star SS that has helped lead to ARods demise. Then there was that GQ article, which certainly didn’t help. His trade to the Yankees, despite arguably being the better all-round SS, combined with his willingness to move to 3B in deference to Jeter didn’t help him, yet it should have. The opt out and mega contract continued the downward spiral. And then the steroid allegations and eventual admission was really the straw that broke the proverbial camel’s back – the camel being Yankee Fans. This latest allegation – and does it really matter if it’s true – serves to cement those negative perceptions of ARod.

    Fact of the matter is that he’s 35 and on the downward slope of a storied, yet steroid-tainted career. While most teams would love to have a 20/80 guy in the middle of the linup, and frankly we should too, it’s the baggage that overshadows the production that most likely will continue to decline. He’s no longer that 30/100 guy, but he’s still good – if he can take the field.

  12. smartchoices January 31st, 2013 at 10:49 pm

    I’m not sure it’s fair to compare A Rod and Andy. My understanding was, Pettitte felt such pressure to perform for the money, he just wanted to heal faster so he could better help the team. At least the first time anyway, not sure about the second.

    And, btw, Jeter doesn’t get a pass on his ‘lifestyle’ from all the fans. Still admire his greatness as a player and team guy, but to call him an all around good role model is stretching it just a bit.

  13. Rich in NJ January 31st, 2013 at 10:52 pm

    I also suspect the the 2004 ALCS produced lasting reverberations for this franchise, and much of it landed at A-Rod’s feet.

    Had the Yankees won the WS that year (A-Rod’s first in NY), I think some fans would have viewed him far differently over the years.

    By some fans, I an referring to the ones who have always been negative toward him, because it’s reasonable to have changed your opinion in light of subsequent facts.

  14. RMS January 31st, 2013 at 11:03 pm

    And, btw, Jeter doesn’t get a pass on his ‘lifestyle’ from all the fans. Still admire his greatness as a player and team guy, but to call him an all around good role model is stretching it just a bit.
    ———————————————————————————————–
    I wouldn’t object to any kids looking up to Jeter as a role model.

  15. J. Alfred Prufrock January 31st, 2013 at 11:12 pm

    You mean, all this time, I’ve been rooting for a “bad guy”?

  16. J. Alfred Prufrock January 31st, 2013 at 11:19 pm

    Rich in NJ January 31st, 2013 at 10:30 pm

    Chip

    Is that all on A-Rod or is it at least partially on the fans? I don’t really have a strong opinion, but I suspect that both bear responsibility.
    ///

    I’d say the type that showed up and booed Alex on my watch as a season ticket holder is pretty easily the lowest common denominator fan.

    These are not the brightest people in Yankee Stadium.

  17. Rich in NJ January 31st, 2013 at 11:20 pm

    Bad is relative, right, Pruf? ;)

  18. pat January 31st, 2013 at 11:21 pm

    Mark Grace gets 4 months in the infamous Miricopa County tent jail for 2nd DUI in 15 months.

  19. Tar January 31st, 2013 at 11:24 pm

    I was kind of “wishy washy” about Alex early on. I thought he tried to hard to be liked and it was transparent. I think NY’ers can sniff out a phony in a heart beat. And he came of as a phony. I really wanted him to just be himself.

    But once Pete Abe started in on him I had to rethink my position. Anybody hated so much by Sox fans had to be doing something right.

    I have since learned to appreciate his desire to win, his eagerness to help young players, and his incredibly high baseball IQ. I have ( I think) seen through the “act” and surprisingly I really like what I see.

    Of course I am and will be disappointed if these latest accusations turn out to be true. But will be a lot more disappointed if he doesn’t play again.

    I have to say I am also really sick and tired of all the sanctimony going on re: steroids and ALex and MLB players in general. “Maybe” us fans were gullible. But I do not give a free pass to MLB or any and all GM’s who signed players that they had to know were using, simply to win more games and make lots more money.

    And as for the press (as a whole) it has acted no better than paparazzi chasing after a Lindsey Lohan or whoever. They love it because it sells more (back to money). And they act like Sharks in a feeding frenzy. Spare us all the Integrity of the game talk, at least until your profession shows some more integrity itself.

    disclaimer: not you Chad. Your my best bud, and we all love and appreciate your hard work. :D

    dismounting soap box.

  20. Rich in NJ January 31st, 2013 at 11:24 pm

    This may be the best thing I have ever seen on the net:

    From July 2006:

    http://sportszilla.blogspot.co.....ndown.html

    Question arising from these developments: If the Yankees win the 2006 World Series, will the Scott Brosius Fan Club, aka the psychotic wing of Yankees fandom, finally consider Alex Rodriguez worthy of his roster spot, or will they claim the team won in spite of him?

    All along, despite mediot goading*, the chances of the Yankees trading Rodriguez have been about the same as the chances Lindsay Lohan will call my cell tonight: technically possible, but, in reality, impossible. Why should they trade him? He slumped badly in June, and any smug bassbowl trying to justify the booing at that time would only have to insist that New York fans are a “what have you done for me lately?” crowd. However, the guy has been tremendous in July, walloping the ball to a 308/388/549 clip. The booing is uncalled for, and it’s shameful (or hilarious, I guess, depending on your point of view) how a minority of Yankees fans are making the whole group look like a bunch of yokels.

  21. J. Alfred Prufrock January 31st, 2013 at 11:25 pm

    Rich, it’s relative. And subjective. And only “good” people, I suppose, get to make those distinctions.

  22. smartchoices January 31st, 2013 at 11:29 pm

    I wouldn’t want my son living that way. It’s hardly respectful, but then men don’t defend women’s modesty and honor the way they used to. Not to mention it’s dangerous these days.

    Anyway, I don’t want to start a hate on Jeter thread. What makes him a great player and team member – the drive, dedication, leadership – he has in spades. That’s enough for me.

  23. J. Alfred Prufrock January 31st, 2013 at 11:31 pm

    Good post, Tar. I quite agree. The media have managed to turn Alex into a kind of martyr.

    Maybe because they’re so thoroughly unlikeable in their eager, venal, obsessive zeal to destroy him utterly.

  24. Rich in NJ January 31st, 2013 at 11:31 pm

    Women need their modesty defended? I mean, if that’s what any particular wants her man to do for her, ok, but as a wider standard, it’s absurd.

  25. smartchoices January 31st, 2013 at 11:32 pm

    Alex only draws ire because of the $189. If that contract wasn’t tying up so much of a limited budget for declining production, people might be genuinely and rightly disappointed, but not this kind of loathing.

  26. Chip January 31st, 2013 at 11:34 pm

    Rich in NJ January 31st, 2013 at 10:30 pm

    Chip

    Is that all on A-Rod or is it at least partially on the fans? I don’t really have a strong opinion, but I suspect that both bear responsibility.
    —————————–

    Some of the silly stuff (the sunbathing pictures in Central Park) being a “big deal” is on the fans.

    But Alex cheated when he was with Texas, he’s cheated in New York, he probably cheated earlier in his career too – that’s not on the fans. Speaking out against steroids on behalf of the Taylor Hooton Foundation while getting them from this clinic is not on the fans. Alex has some serious self image issues – it wasn’t enough to be the best player, he wanted to be the most beloved player as well…and while I don’t begrudge anyone getting paid, having Scott Boras as his agent for that first contract didn’t help either.

  27. Nick in SF January 31st, 2013 at 11:34 pm

    Who called Jeter a bad guy? smartchoices?

    I’m pro-Jeter and I vote.

  28. smartchoices January 31st, 2013 at 11:35 pm

    “Women need their modesty defended?”

    Just saying it used to be that way. I can acknoeledge not everyone places value on that anymore.

  29. Rich in NJ January 31st, 2013 at 11:36 pm

    Chip

    When A-Rod came to NY, no one knew he cheated, but some fans hated him anyway. Those are the fans I am referring to. As I said, when facts change, opinions can change. Absent those facts, it was bizarre.

  30. Rich in NJ January 31st, 2013 at 11:37 pm

    “Just saying it used to be that way. I can acknoeledge not everyone places value on that anymore.”

    OK, but what does that have to do with Jeter.

  31. Tar January 31st, 2013 at 11:37 pm

    “Maybe because they’re so thoroughly unlikeable in their eager, venal, obsessive zeal to destroy him utterly.”

    Hey J alfred :D

    Exactly. At the say time they will try to act so damn sanctimonious it’s sickening. Talk about phony.

    Rich

    I find it bizarre that I mention Lohan ( no idea at all why I picked her.) at the same time you post a reference about her. :shock:

  32. Chip January 31st, 2013 at 11:37 pm

    I’ll even go so far as to say that some of the stuff that’s been done to Alex is completely unfair – Joe Torre throwing him under the bus in the book he wrote with Verducci, Alex’s name being leaked off that “secret” 2009 list.

    The guy is just a lightning rod and when things were going well we lived with it because the production outweighed the BS – you shook your head and accepted the fact that he would make it alright by going out and hitting 4 hrs in 5 at bats. But that’s not the case anymore. He’s an old man with bad hips, declining production and increasing drama. It’s not my money so it’s easy for me to say, but I would just accept the fact that the team is going to have to cut him in a year or two anyway – just bite the bullet and do it now.

  33. J. Alfred Prufrock January 31st, 2013 at 11:39 pm

    Rich,

    It’s true that it was a minority booing Rodriguez in those years. Enough to be heard, though.

    I also don’t think there was much thought behind it; just a monkey see, monkey do kind of contagion. Believe me, these were not the people with their scorecards and pencils. Not the hardcore fan at all. Don’t know if you’ve ever sat in the disabled sections, but the SRO type who likes to make a spectacle of themselves, who bangs on the metal tables just for the sheer pleasure of annoying people – it’s that guy basically who booed Rodriguez. Just dumb people, really.

  34. Rich in NJ January 31st, 2013 at 11:39 pm

    Tar

    She’s captured the public consciousness, I guess. :P

  35. Chip January 31st, 2013 at 11:40 pm

    Rich in NJ January 31st, 2013 at 11:36 pm

    Chip

    When A-Rod came to NY, no one knew he cheated, but some fans hated him anyway. Those are the fans I am referring to. As I said, when facts change, opinions can change. Absent those facts, it was bizarre.
    ——————–

    Oh I agree with you on that – the fans who refused to embrace Alex because of what he said about Derek in GQ are idiots. But for the most part that faded in 2009. There were always going to be a few people who waited by their phones to call WFAN and complain about Alex not being a “true Yankee” when he made an out in a big spot – but it had died down a lot compared to where it was. The stuff since 2009 though – that’s on Alex.

  36. smartchoices January 31st, 2013 at 11:43 pm

    “Who called Jeter a bad guy? ”

    That’s not at all what I was saying. How can anyone look at the good he has done and say that? Just that the lifestyle is isn’t universally appreciated. I didn’t think that statement was that controversial.

  37. Tar January 31st, 2013 at 11:45 pm

    “She’s captured the public consciousness, I guess.”

    Honestly about the only thing I know about her is that she did a “Marilyn” type photo shoot and she has been arrested ( DWI ?) a couple times.

  38. J. Alfred Prufrock January 31st, 2013 at 11:50 pm

    The sportstalk call-ins are walking cliches who always uncritically accept and dutifully repeat the mainstream pablum they read in columns by sportswriters who think in cliches.

    “The crowd is untruth”

  39. smartchoices January 31st, 2013 at 11:52 pm

    “OK, but what does that have to do with Jeter”

    Dating isn’t what it used to be, women aren’t what they used to be. And that lifestyle doesn’t really exemplify modesty does it? I mean the gf is barely covered all over the swimsuit edition.

  40. Chip January 31st, 2013 at 11:56 pm

    So, as the search for a RH 4th OF continues let me throw out this name to you: Chris Denorfia.

    He’s 32 with a .317 BA, .381 OBP, .833 OPS vs. LHP.

    He’s under contract this year and next for a total of $4.25 M. And is the 4th OF behind Quentin, Maybin and Venable. Would the Padres deal him if the Yankees also took back Nick Hundley and the $7M he’s owed between now and 2014 and sent them a decent (albeit not spectacular) prospect in return?

  41. yankeefeminista January 31st, 2013 at 11:59 pm

    The booing of Alex at the Stadium was a feeding frenzy. No matter what he did. Just a mob of ugly dumb sows. Impossible to sit through game after game.

  42. Rich in NJ February 1st, 2013 at 12:03 am

    “Dating isn’t what it used to be, women aren’t what they used to be. ”

    Women still rock.

    “And that lifestyle doesn’t really exemplify modesty does it?”

    OK, you have different values. That’s fine. To each their own.

    “I mean the gf is barely covered all over the swimsuit edition.”

    She’s an independent person. So that’s up to her.

  43. jacksquat February 1st, 2013 at 12:06 am

    I think there is a little too much sanctimony about sanctimony here.

  44. Cashmoney February 1st, 2013 at 12:08 am

    Truth is that baseball fans are willing to forgive a lot.
    ——
    Truth is that Americans are willing to forget a lot.

  45. Cashmoney February 1st, 2013 at 12:09 am

    Just a mob of ugly dumb sows. Impossible to sit through game after game.
    ———-
    I think that’s a little harsh there YF, but carry on.

  46. Bronx Jeers February 1st, 2013 at 12:12 am

    I always preferred the strong, silent type of athlete. God fearing do-gooders that go back to the wife & children every night. Maybe drink a 6-pack or two of domestic while watching the tube and then commit some old fashioned wife-beating or maybe abuse the kiddies.

    These new guys with all their girlfriends make me sick.

  47. smartchoices February 1st, 2013 at 12:20 am

    There’s plenty of kinds of ugly isn’t there? But point taken.

  48. yankeefeminista February 1st, 2013 at 12:26 am

    Cashmoney, not if you had season tickets and sat there every game observing the same behavior. You cannot even imagine how bad it was and how ugly people behaved unless you were there game after game. It made me not even want to go to games.

  49. Cashmoney February 1st, 2013 at 12:44 am

    Fem, I think if you find booing as disdainful acts of betrayal and unbecoming, I understand. I do not. My only point i that to address these fans however loud and obnoxious it appears to you as “sows’ maybe a little harsh.

    I think if I find such act unbearable I would simply stop going for my own sanity sake.

  50. Tar February 1st, 2013 at 12:51 am

    I will boo Youk this year. Oh wait… i’ll really be saying yoooouk. :wink:

    j/k I am not a booer.

    Way past my bed time Good Night all.

  51. yankeefeminista February 1st, 2013 at 12:56 am

    Cashmoney, booing is one thing. I have gone to games my entire life; I am not some novice fan. This was something else; thus my terminology, which I would never use generally about people booing. But I guess you had to have been there game in and game out to understand.

  52. yankeefeminista February 1st, 2013 at 1:05 am

    Tar, we “youked” derisively when Youk played LF at NYS in August of 2009. Barrels of fun. Though the idea of “youking” for him as a Yankee is still a foreign concept.

  53. blake February 1st, 2013 at 6:26 am

    “We talked about a long-term contract briefly at the start of these negotiations,” Headley told Bill Center of the San Diego Union-Tribune. “It was a quick discussion. We weren’t on the same page right from the start. This close to free agency, it has to be a good deal for us. You can’t sacrifice what’s fair.

    Read more at http://www.mlbtraderumors.com/.....OIXpfIt.99

    Translation….. He’s getting traded

  54. Shame Spencer February 1st, 2013 at 7:29 am

    Chad said the Yanks haven’t shown any interest at all in Headley… I’ll just file this in the ‘stealth Cashman’ part of my brain, however.

    I refuse to give up!!

  55. austinmac February 1st, 2013 at 7:36 am

    Headley at third base would truly be a key move going forward. Maybe by the TD our guys guys are producing at a higher minor league level and have more value.

  56. blake February 1st, 2013 at 7:52 am

    The Padres are hoping Headley as a big first half….or at least a good first half and that his value with hold until the deadline most likely…..my guess is that they would have liked to have moved him this winter but they may not have gotten the offers they wanted and also from a PR standpoint it would look pretty bad to trade a player that just jumped in production like that immediately…..

    If they are really that far apart on an extension then I think they’ll let Gyroko have half a year at AAA then move Headley at the dealine and bring him up for the 2nd half….

  57. Shame Spencer February 1st, 2013 at 7:54 am

    Some sad NY news today: Ed Koch has passed away.

  58. Shame Spencer February 1st, 2013 at 7:56 am

    If we aren’t looking outside the organization, then you have to hope they allow Adams a shot even with Youk on board.

    We can’t go into next year having the same questions. We have to know if Adams is at least a viable option there by the end of the year.

  59. Yankee Trader February 1st, 2013 at 8:29 am

    Good morning-

    Where is David Adams going to play now that Alex is “looking forward to getting back on the field as soon as possible?”

    I suppose he can be the starting 2nd baseman when Cano is either traded or leaves as a FA at the end of the season! :)

  60. blake February 1st, 2013 at 8:44 am

    “Where is David Adams going to play now that Alex is “looking forward to getting back on the field as soon as possible?”

    probably AAA until forever or until he’s traded.

  61. Yankee Trader February 1st, 2013 at 8:51 am

    Blake-

    Now that ARod has stated he plans to fullfill the remainder of his contract as a Yankee, and plans to be on the field this year, he should play the majority of his time at 3rd with occasional rest at DH.

  62. Ghostwriter February 1st, 2013 at 8:53 am

    Chad,

    This was a truly excellent post. I think that you hit the nail right on the head with your comparison of ARod and Pettitte, and the differing fan reactions to them.

  63. Ghostwriter February 1st, 2013 at 9:11 am

    Rich in NJ January 31st, 2013 at 10:03 pm

    I have always wondered if A-Rod would have been treated differently if he had been a lifelong Yankee.

    ==

    No. However, A-Rod would have been treated differently if he had remained a lifelong Mariner. I just don’t think that ARod was cut out for the moving around, and grabbing the biggest MLB salary the way that he did. Being in New York from the beginning would have played on his insecurities just the same way that the big contract from the Rangers did. In fact, I suspect that if he had stayed in Seattle, he might never have tried steroids, and he might even have wound up as revered as Jeter. I think that chasing the money exposed ARod’s character flaws in a way that a full career as a Seattle Mariner never would have. Of course, the fact that ARod left Seattle in the first place demonstrates that what happened to him had to happen, because he left Seattle even though he had it so good there. In this way, Alex is almost like a tragic Greek hero: great in many ways, but with a tragic flaw destined to be his undoing.

  64. Money Mike February 1st, 2013 at 9:13 am

    I find it interesting how Andy’s personal life never had a big deal made about it when he cheated on his wife, forcing him to move to Houston so he would be away from his mistress and keep him family together… seems like that would have been a juicier story than was ever made about it.

  65. Ghostwriter February 1st, 2013 at 9:15 am

    Yankee Trader February 1st, 2013 at 8:51 am

    Blake-

    Now that ARod has stated he plans to fullfill the remainder of his contract as a Yankee, and plans to be on the field this year, he should play the majority of his time at 3rd with occasional rest at DH.
    ==============

    I still want to see Alex’s lateral movement when he gets back. I really think that the best way to maximize ARod’s contributions would be to make him a full-time DH. I think that if we got him healthy, 2010-level production is a reasonable possibility.

  66. 4TrainNorth February 1st, 2013 at 9:23 am

    Remember when El Cacique came back from the cyst injury in 2009, right on the heels of of being outed as a juicer, and knocked a three-run HR against the O’s on the first pitch he saw? It was a triumphant moment; fans seemed willing to forgive right then and there. Seems like ages ago.


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