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A New York Yankees blog by Chad Jennings and the staff of The Journal News


Pinch hitting: Marcus Zappia

Posted by: Chad Jennings - Posted in Misc on Feb 02, 2013 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

Next up in the Pinch Hitters series is Marcus Zappia, a middle school teacher who’s been coaching high school baseball for nearly 20 years. He’s a self described “happily married father of a remarkable three-year old daughter from Endicott, New York.”

Another self description: “I probably can be counted among the prospect huggers,” Marcus wrote. “I understand that a prospect is just a prospect, and the attrition rate is ridiculous, but I started following the minors and the draft in the early ’90′s, and that spoiled me. When the Yankees drafted Derek Jeter, I watched him progress at each level, albeit quickly, and now you look up and he’s a first-ballot Hall of Famer. It’s that hope that there is another Jeter or Posada (who I saw play second base at Oneonta) or Andy Pettitte that makes it fun.”

For his post, Marcus took his prospect knowledge into the future.

You may need a premise to get into the right headspace for this.

It is Opening Day of 2016. In response to all that Major League Baseball has done to minimize the New York Yankees – and as a result of ownership’s desire to control costs in an ever-increasing fashion — the team has foregone the practice of acquiring players from outside the organization. They are fielding a team of players entirely from their current farm system, as well as guys who are playing out long-term contracts or are under team control.

Each player who reached free agency after the 2013 season and beyond was allowed to leave. That means Phil Hughes, Joba Chamberlain, Dave Robertson, and Robinson Cano – among others — are all gone.

Here is what the Yankees would send north, with Opening Day ages in parentheses.

C - Gary Sanchez (23)
C - J.R. Murphy (24)
1B - Mark Teixeira (36 shortly after Opening Day)
2B - David Adams (29)
SS - Cito Culver (23)
3B - Dante Bichette (23)
INF - Corban Joseph (27)
INF - Eduardo Nunez (29)
LF - Slade Heathcott (25)
CF - Mason Williams (24)
RF - Tyler Austin (24)
OF - Abe Almonte (26)
OF - Ramon Flores (24)

SP – CC Sabathia (35)
SP - Michael Pineda (27)
SP - Manny Banuelos (25)
SP - David Phelps (29)
SP - Brett Marshall (26)
RP - Mark Montgomery (25)
RP - Corey Black (24)
RP - Nick Goody (24)
RP - Jose Ramirez (26)
RP - Branden Pinder (27)
RP - Nik Turley (26)
RP - Francisco Rondon (28 shortly after Opening Day)

A-Rod still has two years on his contract, but he has been either bought out or put on the 60-day DL at this point. If he is still in the organization, A-Rod, CC, and Tex combine to make $67.5 million in 2016.

By next January, Zoilo Almonte, Tommy Kahnle, and Austin Romine could make it so they need to be included in future lists like this.

This team has some speed and some pop, just not what we’re used to. The lineup has four right-handers, two lefties, and two switch-hitters. The outfield can really defend, and the corners can throw. Murphy develops a year ahead of Sanchez, but Sanchez hits enough to get to the Majors, and Murphy catches 60 games as a heady backup that can swing the bat.

Culver is brought to the Majors to play defense and hit competently in the nine hole. Flores can play first when Teixeira is the designated hitter, which is about 50 times. Joseph can play second and third, and Nunez still backs up at short, DH’s against lefties, and runs. Almonte is a great team guy who can play three outfield positions and run. The bench has two lefty bats, a righty, and a switch hitter.

The rotation has two lefties and three righties. Turley is the long man in the bullpen who can spot start and is left-handed. Montgomery closes. Ramirez, Pinder, and especially Black can fire it, and Goody is good for the sixth or seventh. When Rondon knows where it’s going, he is not fun to face if you are a left-handed hitter.

Younger? Check. More athletic? Check. Better? Well … here’s the thing. Wouldn’t a lot of fans really like watching this team? Wouldn’t they be very easy to root for?

What’s also exciting is that there could be a stacked AAA team competing and pushing the Major League team. With Peter O’Brien, Greg Bird, Anderson Feliz, Angelo Gumbs, Ravel Santana, Claudio Custodio, Miguel Andujar, and Jake Cave in the lineup and Jose Campos, Ty Hensley, Rafael DePaula, Bryan Mitchell, and Giovanny Gallegos on the pitching staff, there will be a lot of talent on the cusp. Factor in what could also be a loaded Trenton staff at the time and a bunch of potential number one picks in 2013 and 2014, and this could be a great system very soon.

This roster assumes two things you can never assume — health and steady development — but since it’s just for fun, let the message board trashing begin!

Associated Press photos of Banuelos and Murphy

 
 

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118 Responses to “Pinch hitting: Marcus Zappia”

  1. Shame Spencer February 2nd, 2013 at 9:04 am

    2B – David Adams (29)
    SS – Cito Culver (23)
    3B – Dante Bichette (23)
    INF – Corban Joseph (27)
    INF – Eduardo Nunez (29)

    This INF is ugly.

    What happened to Nova? If we traded him we should have traded him for a better INFer ;)

  2. Shame Spencer February 2nd, 2013 at 9:06 am

    Younger? Check. More athletic? Check. Better? Well …

    ——————————

    :lol:

  3. austinmac February 2nd, 2013 at 9:09 am

    I like the optimism, but the odds of all these guys playing in the majors is only slightly more likely than me playing.

  4. Rich in NJ February 2nd, 2013 at 9:09 am

    If their drafting and development had been better, this plan would have been a lot more viable.

  5. blake February 2nd, 2013 at 9:14 am

    Trader,

    I’ll say yes to the cano question….but I believe the contract will be bad….very bad

  6. Shame Spencer February 2nd, 2013 at 9:14 am

    I mean, I agree with Marcus that it’d be a fun team to root for… but I think it’s more fun rooting for a winner. I don’t think that lineup would compete. I think of that group you’d probably have a couple really nice surprises and a lot of AAA or AAAA type players.

    That pitching is hard to get behind right now.. Still wondering what we did with Nova lol.

  7. austinmac February 2nd, 2013 at 9:14 am

    Guys like Bowden who are predicting big spending after 2014 are the same guys who said they would be all over Bourne. We understand the state of things better than they do, unfortunately.

    I love young players. Let’s mix some in, but the team proposed is uncommonly bad. Many of these guys likely don’t see AAA.

    Speaking of AAA, why do the Yankees now seem to think it is required before promotion? If players are doing well in AA, let’s see what they can do. Most other teams do so.

  8. pat February 2nd, 2013 at 9:16 am

    BrianCostaWSJ

    Mark Teixeira tells @DanBarbarisi: “If I hit .250, .260, instead of .280, so be it.” I kind of like his realism here: http://online.wsj.com/article/.....28128.html

    I understand the realism just not sure I want to hear Tex say it.

  9. Yankee Trader February 2nd, 2013 at 9:17 am

    Marcus-

    Enjoyed your article and can’t wait to see some responses from YF and JAP who follow the prospects closely and have seen them play.

    ” Factor in what could also be a loaded Trenton staff at the time and a bunch of potential number one picks in 2013 and 2014, and this could be a great system very soon.”

    I would, however, like to forego the thought of the Yankees getting the #1 pick, as the worst team in baseball. :)

  10. Shame Spencer February 2nd, 2013 at 9:20 am

    mac – What I don’t get about that article is that it implies the reining in of spending this offseason will help them next offseason…. I don’t quite get that. They won’t be under the cap in 2013. They need to reduce payroll more next off season. Maybe he’s assuming no one signed this year will be back so you drop Andy, Kuroda, and Youk… I dunno that that’s enough to get us under in 2014.

  11. Rich in NJ February 2nd, 2013 at 9:20 am

    but I think it’s more fun rooting for a winner
    -

    If done right, and balanced out with some a few more veterans acquired with the benefit of a fairly large payroll, this type of team would be in a position to win more over a longer time horizon.

  12. Rich in NJ February 2nd, 2013 at 9:22 am

    I understand the realism just not sure I want to hear Tex say it.
    -

    This is why long-term, huge money contracts are bad. Tex has become extremely complacent, and why not, the checks will keep coming, no matter what.

  13. Shame Spencer February 2nd, 2013 at 9:24 am

    pat February 2nd, 2013 at 9:16 am

    BrianCostaWSJ

    Mark Teixeira tells @DanBarbarisi: “If I hit .250, .260, instead of .280, so be it.” I kind of like his realism here: http://online.wsj.com/article/…..28128.html …

    I understand the realism just not sure I want to hear Tex say it.

    ——————————

    I mean… ugh.

    The thing more concerning about Tex are his OBP number since 2008… it’s been a real steady drop. I can take the average if he’s still getting on base 40% of the time… but he’s well below that point right now. And on pace to drop to around .300 this season.

  14. randy l. February 2nd, 2013 at 9:25 am

    “I like the optimism, but the odds of all these guys playing in the majors is only slightly more likely than me playing.”

    austin mac-

    from jerkface’s prospect success link:

    “About 30% of position players ranked 21-100 succeed in the majors (with the success rate declining over that ranking range from about 36% to about 25%)”
    http://www.royalsreview.com/20.....-prospects

    so if you have three top hundred prospects ranked 21-100, one will have success in the majors.

    many of the so called yankee prospects aren’t even in the top 100 so their chances are really low.

  15. Yankee Trader February 2nd, 2013 at 9:25 am

    Pat-

    Tex will never hit for average, especially facing righties, and against teams that employ the shift. BA facing righties last two years-.223 and .239 last year. The Rays and the Orioles are the two teams that employ it most often-that’s 38 games this season.

    He has already stated his days of trying to hit the other way are over.

  16. Rich in NJ February 2nd, 2013 at 9:30 am

    At some point, Tex may become a very highly paid platoon player.

  17. Cashmoney February 2nd, 2013 at 9:32 am

    I understand the realism just not sure I want to hear Tex say it.
    ——-
    He is platoon player now if his D was not so good.

  18. Shame Spencer February 2nd, 2013 at 9:33 am

    He has already stated his days of trying to hit the other way are over.
    ——————-

    Which is kinda ridiculous given how much time he has left in the majors… Like I said, you can deal with that average if is OBP was higher… but he’s like a sinking ship!! I hope Tex bounces back a little.

  19. randy l. February 2nd, 2013 at 9:34 am

    “SP – Michael Pineda (27)”

    randy l.’s official scouting report( crystal ball) dated jan 2012 says relief pitcher for pineda in 2016

    the question is how good of a relief pitcher will he be.

    closer? maybe

    more likely joba’s present role

  20. Tar February 2nd, 2013 at 9:35 am

    Marcus I like it!

    Even if half of them made it (unlikely) they would be a lot of fun to root for.

  21. Shame Spencer February 2nd, 2013 at 9:36 am

    Actually, now that I look at it, maybe Tex just had a really bad year or something.. the last time he OBP’d that low was his rookie season. Maybe it was just a one off. It just sucks his other numbers have also taken a hit. Makes it less likely it isn’t trending one way.

  22. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 9:36 am

    I don’t think that Steinbrenner wants to be the Kansas City Royals; the goal is to limit the payroll to “only” $189 million.

  23. Yankee Trader February 2nd, 2013 at 9:38 am

    Shame-

    Look at the projected 2014 payroll attached and think that Jeter will be back, with a possible extension and bump in salary and if ARod is still a Yankee after missing all of 2013, then factor in another 6M when he gets his 14th homer, passing Mays.

    This is only payroll, not AAV. There are multiple arbitration cases and so many holes to fill if all free agents leave..

    Again think of the fiscal cliff number as 177M, not 189M, to account for projected benefits that all teams are expected to have to pay to their 40 man roster in 2014.

    https://spreadsheets.google.com/pub?key=tpQLwiiQL4kzEzLhsUqVjLQ&output=html

  24. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 9:39 am

    Rich in NJ February 2nd, 2013 at 9:30 am

    At some point, Tex may become a very highly paid platoon player.
    ============

    He kind of is that already. Girardi just acts as if it isn’t so.

  25. Cashmoney February 2nd, 2013 at 9:41 am

    shame, I think Tex can no longer catch up to a high octane fb as right hander, that will exploited.

    Do I want dead pull hitter who can only hit mediocre pitching as my every day 1b, not really. do I have better option as of now, I don’t think so.

  26. Yankee Trader February 2nd, 2013 at 9:41 am

    Should say projected benefits that all teams will have to pay “for” their players on the 40 man roster.

  27. Yankee Trader February 2nd, 2013 at 9:44 am

    Cash-

    Now we will see, vs righties, 1/3rd of the lineup-Tex, Hafner, and Granderson, unable to poke a hit thru the infield, as they all are looking to loft the ball vs the shifts that they will face.

  28. randy l. February 2nd, 2013 at 9:46 am

    “He has already stated his days of trying to hit the other way are over.”

    that is also so effing ridiculous because it’s so easy to hit the other way.

    teixeira is like the pro golfer who can only draw the ball or fade the ball. any really good pro can fade and draw at will. teixeira simply has no incentive to dig down and work at reacquiring his ability to hit to the opposite gap. he’s got the contract . he’s rich. he doesn’t care. seriously.
    to not even try means he doesn’t care. really a waste of talent. he kissed a hall of fame career goodbye with his stubbornness.

  29. Shame Spencer February 2nd, 2013 at 9:48 am

    Trader – Are all of those numbers accurate? Jeter will cost more than $3 million in 2014, even if he just exercises his player option.

    Those are still a lot of holes to fill.. we need to give guys some development time in the bigs this year to pull this off.

  30. Cashmoney February 2nd, 2013 at 9:48 am

    good point YT, I don’t how big of pull hitter Pronk is, but I see your point. I don’t know if it’s injury, The Tex I saw LY, lost a lot bat speed, that itself will manifest in stats.

  31. Rich in NJ February 2nd, 2013 at 9:51 am

    The most likely path to fielding an improving, young, cost-controlled team in 2014 and beyond would be to make smart trades for Cano and Granderson now, getting back some potential impact bats. But it would be a risk, so it doesn’t appear that they will trade either.

  32. randy l. February 2nd, 2013 at 9:53 am

    i think one scenario is that hal changes course by 2016 when he fails to make the playoffs two years in a row in 2014 and 2015 which causes a fan backlash and results in vastly reduced ticket sales.

  33. austinmac February 2nd, 2013 at 9:55 am

    The team doesn’t take risks. They seem to prefer a slow decline.

  34. Yankee Trader February 2nd, 2013 at 9:55 am

    Randy-

    I remember reading that Teixeira worked last offseason more in the batting cage, than with weights, working on hitting the other way. After his bout with lingering bronchitis to start the season, he abandoned his off season work and told the media he is being paid to hit homeruns.

    Here’s the article on his offseason approach:

    http://www.nydailynews.com/spo.....e-1.122590

  35. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 10:02 am

    Yankee Trader February 2nd, 2013 at 9:55 am

    Randy-

    I remember reading that Teixeira worked last offseason more in the batting cage, than with weights, working on hitting the other way. After his bout with lingering bronchitis to start the season, he abandoned his off season work and told the media he is being paid to hit homeruns.

    Here’s the article on his offseason approach:

    http://www.nydailynews.com/spo…..e-1.122590
    =============

    That article is nearly two years old. At any rate, we now have had two full seasons to demonstrate that the article was total BS! :( At least, Tex isn’t BS-ing us anymore. I prefer him not getting my hopes up needlessly.

  36. Cashmoney February 2nd, 2013 at 10:06 am

    I agree Rich on Grandy and Cano but I don’t think Yanks can pull off smart trades nor do i think they will part vital part offense in season if they have a shot at the playoff.

    I was thinking more of 15 in this case because I think that’s more of a likely timetable the Yough in single A are able to contribute if the make it.

    That why i think the best thing that can possibly occur in terms of future prosperity might be they sucking it up royally this season which might lead to different thinking off season and trading off one year pieces during the season.

  37. Yankee Trader February 2nd, 2013 at 10:06 am

    Rich-

    It doesn’t appear that Cano or Granderson will be traded before opening day. Unless MLB changes the compensatory pick rules, any player traded in season who is approaching free agency, loses the pick for the team that gets the free agent to be. You know that a team that trades for Cano at the deadline will not get a window, per Boras, to get him signed to an extension.

    Therefore the Yankees return will most likely be less.

    Unless some “miracle” happens and ARod voluntarily retires in 2013 so that his AAV of 27.5M plus a possible marketing bonus of 6M that would come into play in 2014, if he misses all of 2013, then IMHO Cano will not be back.

  38. Cashmoney February 2nd, 2013 at 10:07 am

    *youngsters … typing on my phone

  39. Felix February 2nd, 2013 at 10:08 am

    They allow you to TEACH our young people with these kinda ideas…. Heaven help tomorrows Children!

  40. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 10:09 am

    Rich in NJ February 2nd, 2013 at 9:51 am

    The most likely path to fielding an improving, young, cost-controlled team in 2014 and beyond would be to make smart trades for Cano and Granderson now, getting back some potential impact bats. But it would be a risk, so it doesn’t appear that they will trade either.
    ==============

    This sounds about right to me. Maybe they’ll move one of them at the trade deadline. I would certainly move Cano, because he is going to demand the kind of contract that has gotten this club into its current situation. I like Cano, but I don’t want to see him consuming 14 percent of the Yanks’ payroll in 2021, when he’s 38. It’ll be interesting to see if Hank caves on this one: My guess is that he probably kicks himself for the ARod deal, and won’t give in to Cano.

  41. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 10:10 am

    That article on Tex seems to have gone elsewhere

    Austin, a slow decline is like the Titanic going down vs the Lusitania – more time to get off but what does it matter if half the people don’t believe in getting in them sixteeen lifeboats

  42. blake February 2nd, 2013 at 10:12 am

    @DanBarbarisi: Also in this story, Teixeira explains why he can never justify his massive contract. “I’m overpaid.” http://t.co/l8woS6Yx

    At least he’s honest

  43. randy l. February 2nd, 2013 at 10:16 am

    ghostwriter and yankee trader-

    teixeira makes it really easy for the pitcher and catcher when they know what he’s trying to do.

    if teixeira ,25% of the time, in favorable counts ,decided that if he got a pitch away he’d go that way, it would create such a variable in pitchers and catchers heads that he’d get much better pitches to pull.

    if the pitch isn’t away, he simply takes it. it is such an easy thing to do. this is different than going with the pitch which is more difficult.it’s very easy to hit the opposite way when it’s predetermined to hit that way if the pitch is on the outside of plate. you look there from the get go. if no ball there, no swingy.

    easy easy.

  44. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 10:17 am

    I wish I was overpaid….

  45. Yankee Trader February 2nd, 2013 at 10:18 am

    Cash-

    Teixeira has addressed trying to go the other way the past two offseasons. Here’s his work on bunting before the 2012 season:

    “But Teixeira is concerned about getting on base more. Until the 2009 season, he was a .290 hitter with a .378 on-base percentage. Over the past few seasons, his batting average has dipped. He hit .256 in 2010 and only .248 last year; from the left side, his average was .244 two years ago and .224 last year.”

    “If I show that I can actually do it, and I’m also using the whole field, teams are going to have to switch around,” he said.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03......html?_r=0

  46. Duh Innings II February 2nd, 2013 at 10:19 am

    The 2016 Yankees rotation after Sabathia will most likely be a guy signed after 2013/14/15 for the #2, a pair of homegrown starters for the #3 and #4, and a scrapheap pickup, a reclamation project, or (ideally) a third homegrown starter for the #5.

    The 2016 bullpen and bench are complete mysteries as bullpens and benches are always that when looking at three years down the road. All we’ll know for certain is Mo will not be pitching, but then again who knows?

    I could see Gary Sanchez at C. Teixiera would be at 1B in his walk year. Cano could be in his third year under contract with the Yanks or somewhere else. No idea who the 3B could be – Chase Headley? Jeter would be in his walk year (as no way he’s accepting a year or two after 2013) but not at SS as some kid with a good glove will be at SS – Jeter will be the no-power DH. The outfield will most likely have a pair of free-agent signings and a homegrown player.

  47. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 10:19 am

    blake February 2nd, 2013 at 10:12 am

    @DanBarbarisi: Also in this story, Teixeira explains why he can never justify his massive contract. “I’m overpaid.” http://t.co/l8woS6Yx

    At least he’s honest
    ===============================

    Sadly, he isn’t even being honest with himself, “”I have no problem with anybody in New York, any fan, saying you’re overpaid. Because I am,” Teixeira said. “We all are.” Tex should stick to speaking for himself. The other guys in the league practice hard to make themselves better, while he apparently just resigns himself to stagnation and decline. If Tex really thinks that he is overpaid then he has two honorable options at his disposal: One is to work harder to be worth the contract, or he can resign.

  48. Duh Innings II February 2nd, 2013 at 10:19 am

    * The #3 starter could be a free agent, too.

  49. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 10:23 am

    Or you can take the George Bell approach and hit singles off your feet when u should really be getting that shoulder redone – the somewhat slow decline of a former MVP and a funny Sammy Chicago switch

  50. blake February 2nd, 2013 at 10:23 am

    Tex works hard….it’s not his fault the Yankees failed to recognize that his swing wouldn’t age well from the left side and have him a huge contract

  51. Yankee Trader February 2nd, 2013 at 10:25 am

    Randy-

    There was an excellent article in USA Today Baseball Weekly on the Maddon Shift, last season.

    Basically the Rays GM has spent money on analytic advisors and Maddon has worked with his pitchers to pitch to location that pretty much forces the pull hitters to hit into the shift, and the infield is in almost constant motion to gobble up any ground ball for an out.

  52. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 10:26 am

    Ghost, there aren’t too many Lyman Bostocks around.

  53. blake February 2nd, 2013 at 10:27 am

    I actually think it’s absolutely the right move for Tex to accept what he is and just maximize that.

    Tinkering and trying to change is only going toake things worse at this point.

    He’s a great defender…. A good hitter right handed and a homer hitter left handed….. Maximize those things and he’s still really valuable even if over paid

  54. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 10:28 am

    Darn those Rays; hope this is the year they take their big toe nail off with the vacuum cleaner.

  55. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 10:28 am

    blake February 2nd, 2013 at 10:23 am

    Tex works hard….it’s not his fault the Yankees failed to recognize that his swing wouldn’t age well from the left side and have him a huge contract
    =

    I don’t know… maybe he does work hard. However, from what he says in the article, I’m not impressed with his work ethic. I wonder how he’ll respond to being a a .240 hitter in a year or tow, now that he’s resigned himself to being a .250 hitter. Will he then just resign himself to being a .240 hitter? More and more, Tex strikes me as a guy, who plans on coasting, now that he got his big contract.

  56. J. Alfred Prufrock February 2nd, 2013 at 10:28 am

    Marcus, I like the way you think. :D .

    I wonder if you could possibly share anything about seeing Posada play 2B? Before he broke his leg? He describes himself as having been “fast”, lol. I sorely miss Posada; any remembrances from those days you might have would be greatly appreciated :D .

    By 2016, if we’re suspending disbelief and taking for granted unbroken and linear progress, we really need to see either Feliz (my personal favorite position player in the system and already in High A) or Gumbs manning 2B – not David Adams.

    I like what I have seen of Adams’ poise and mature hitting at Trenton, and wanted him to get a shot even last season at 3B, but he’d only be there in 3 years if the other two don’t develop further, get traded, or get hurt. There’s a chance that one of them could be moved to the OF, but they both profile to be above average offensive 2B if all goes even conservatively well.

    Jo-Ram might be in that rotation by then, and I’m going to take encouragement by Betances’ AFL showing and see him straightened out for 2013 and beyond.

    These low-A guys are so young, but one is really looking forward to the progress of Santana and Andujar as they hopefully progress through the system.

    Shame – don’t you know that Nova’s out of fashion? ;)

  57. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 10:32 am

    jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 10:26 am

    Ghost, there aren’t too many Lyman Bostocks around.
    =====

    I had never heard of him until you mentioned him. What an interesting (and ultimately very sad) story.

  58. blake February 2nd, 2013 at 10:32 am

    “I don’t know… maybe he does work hard. However, from what he says in the article, I’m not impressed with his work ethic. I”

    You can’t change what you are when you are 33 years old….players are aging at a natural pace again in the game. 33 is starting get get old again…..I’m sure if he could make himself have Cano’s swing and hit .280 he would…..but it’s not that easy.

    What Tex needs to focus on is getting back to being an elite hitter from the right side where his swing is better….and trying to walk more and hit homers from the left side

  59. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 10:33 am

    With ballplayers, they all have different physical ages regardless of chronological status and this I think contributes to the difficulty of projecting just how good an elder batsman will be. ” Winfield and Molitar, u will play forever and meet Minnie Minosa in the land of Never Never.”

  60. 86w183 February 2nd, 2013 at 10:33 am

    That roster has as much chance of ever being put together as A-Rod has of being the next Commissioner of MLB.

    It looks like the 2013 payroll is going to be in the $ 210 M range, which means they’ll have to drop about $ 32 M to get to the goal.

    Coming off the books —

    Pitchers —– Kuroda, Pettitte, Rivera, Hughes, Logan and Chamberlain = $ 50 M

    Players —– Granderson, Cano, Youkilis, Hafner, Diaz et al = $ 50 M

    Ex Yankee — AJ Burnett = $ 8.5 M

    Yes, there are a lot of holes to fill, but they will have about $ 75 M or so to work with to fill ten spots on the 25-man roster.

    If kids (Pineda, Banuelos, Montgomery, Marshall, Austin, Williams, et al) can take five jobs for about $ 5 M combined. That leaves five good major leaguers making an average of $ 14 or so.

    It’s not impossible, but it’s much more difficult if there’s another $ 20 M + guy on the roster.

    Of course it’s a lot easier if A-Rod disappears

  61. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 10:36 am

    Ghost, yes, its one of those stories that make you say, ” what kind of god would allow this to happen? “

  62. blake February 2nd, 2013 at 10:37 am

    Tex becoming an elite RH hitter again woukd be huge….given the lineup construction they really need that to happen

  63. Yankee Trader February 2nd, 2013 at 10:38 am

    Blake-

    His OPS from the right side was .967 in 2011 with an OBP of .380. That all declined significantly in 2012 with a drop in BA and OBP.

    Unless he reverses his trend from the right side I’m not sure he can be considered a good hitter against lefties.

  64. J. Alfred Prufrock February 2nd, 2013 at 10:38 am

    …and for my money, I’d give it an emphatic yes! on whether a young, predominantly homegrown lineup like that would invigorate the fanbase.

    Should have been already transitioning in the youngsters the last few years, with Jeter, Mo, Andy and yes, Alex, still viable.

  65. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 10:39 am

    Alfred, I’ll suspend disbelief if you will :D

  66. J. Alfred Prufrock February 2nd, 2013 at 10:39 am

    sorry, should have said homegrown *roster.

    Good job, Marcus!

  67. blake February 2nd, 2013 at 10:40 am

    Trader,

    I think/hope the decline vs LHP was an anomaly last year given that he was sick and hurt all year…maybe not….but that decline was morenjustbone year than a multi year trend like his LH production. His swing is better equipped to age right handed and that’s his natural side so hopefully he will bounce back there this year

  68. 86w183 February 2nd, 2013 at 10:40 am

    Tex becoming an elite RH hitter again would be huge….given the lineup construction they really need that to happen

    ****************************************************************

    Absolutely. I think Tex is the most important guy in the lineup this season because of the great range of performance that he’s shown in the last three years and the RH power void that current exists.

    I must say, though I don’t get the comments about no longer trying to go the other way. I rarely saw him go to LF/LCF from the left side in the last two years.

  69. J. Alfred Prufrock February 2nd, 2013 at 10:40 am

    jmills, :D With some of these kids, I’m already on the belief trail.

    Can’t wait for the baseball season – the AA baseball season, that is ;) .

    And a good morning to you, sir.

  70. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 10:41 am

    I wish I had a name like Marcus Zappia , then I could write songs about growing dental floss in Montana or something.

  71. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 10:42 am

    blake February 2nd, 2013 at 10:32 am

    “I don’t know… maybe he does work hard. However, from what he says in the article, I’m not impressed with his work ethic. I”

    You can’t change what you are when you are 33 years old….players are aging at a natural pace again in the game. 33 is starting get get old again…..I’m sure if he could make himself have Cano’s swing and hit .280 he would…..but it’s not that easy.
    ====================

    He didn’t start to decline when he turned 33; he started to decline after he got his big contract.

  72. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 10:43 am

    Good morning, Alfred; still horizontal here, no need to “rush” for the porridge on Saturdays!

  73. blake February 2nd, 2013 at 10:46 am

    “He didn’t start to decline when he turned 33; he started to decline after he got his big contract.”

    He was really good the first year of it then he got closer to 30…..his swing from the left side was always going to age early IMO….I said that 3 years ago….

  74. Yankee Trader February 2nd, 2013 at 10:47 am

    JAP-

    Always enjoy your inside info on the Baby Bombers. Now if someone would go gently wake up YF so we can get her input to the post this morning by Marcus. :)

  75. Stoneburner - The Return of Wax February 2nd, 2013 at 10:48 am

    OF – Ramon Flores (24)

    ******

    That’s not true. Flores is around the same age as Williams – he is 21 I believe – - – -

  76. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 10:51 am

    86w183 February 2nd, 2013 at 10:40 am

    Tex becoming an elite RH hitter again would be huge….given the lineup construction they really need that to happen

    ****************************************************************

    Absolutely. I think Tex is the most important guy in the lineup this season because of the great range of performance that he’s shown in the last three years and the RH power void that current exists.

    I must say, though I don’t get the comments about no longer trying to go the other way. I rarely saw him go to LF/LCF from the left side in the last two years.

    =========

    Tex really could be the linchpin next year. Hopefully he’ll stay healthy and get on a roll early in the season, because it would be huge. Still, the Yanks can win with Tex as a .250 hitter. The problem with Tex isn’t that he’s unproductive, it’s that his production is sporadic. It’s all or nothing.

    I really hope that Tex was just trying to manage expectations in that article, and not truly speaking his mind.

  77. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 10:52 am

    ” Baby bombers ” – how wonderfully affectionate!

    One of two air worthy Lancasters is here in Hamilton and tends to take a gracious Rolls Royce engined route right over my house.

  78. J. Alfred Prufrock February 2nd, 2013 at 10:53 am

    Yankee Trader,

    Thanks, Trader… I take for granted all the great research links you provide and your insight into the more technical aspects of different surgical procedures and your thoughtful input on likely outcomes, etc. Invaluable!

    Yankeefem I’m sure will weigh in eventually :) .

  79. Yankee Trader February 2nd, 2013 at 10:53 am

    Is this the possible Yankee lineup vs a righty?

    Ichiro RF
    Jeter SS
    Cano 2B
    Teixeira 1B
    Hafner DH
    Youkilis 3B
    Granderson LF
    Cervelli C
    Gardner CF

  80. blake February 2nd, 2013 at 10:54 am

    Trader,

    I like that vs RHP

  81. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 10:58 am

    I’m not sure that I would bat Tex that high against a righty. I would swap Tex with Granderson against righties: Bat Grandy in the 4-hole, and Tex in the 7-hole (or thereabouts).

  82. J. Alfred Prufrock February 2nd, 2013 at 10:59 am

    If some of those names were in the primes of their careers, that would be a pretty good lineup.

  83. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 11:03 am

    Alfred, you gotta’ BeLeaf like Toronto vs Montreal ’67.

  84. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 11:04 am

    J. Alfred Prufrock February 2nd, 2013 at 10:59 am

    If some of those names were in the primes of their careers, that would be a pretty good lineup.
    ================

    It should be a competitive club. With the pitching that this club has, I wouldn’t e the least bit surprissed to see them make a good run at the WS. And I have a very good feeling about Ichiro and Youk (I can hardly wait to see Youk hit a big bomb in Fenway to break the Red Sox faithfuls’ hearts).

  85. J. Alfred Prufrock February 2nd, 2013 at 11:08 am

    jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 11:03 am

    Alfred, you gotta’ BeLeaf like Toronto vs Montreal ’67.
    ///

    Funny jmills, I recently had to remember a number that ended in ’67. I usually associate numbers I need to recall with either player uniform numbers, years of championships, a combination of both and sometimes something else unrelated that makes it stick in my memory.

    For instance, the Princeton library here ends in 9529, so i always think Alexei Morozov/Reijo Ruotsalainen – I can never forget the number, now.

    I have no affinity for the Leafs, outside of a lasting admiration for Keon, but the first thing I thought of, to fasten “67″ to my memory, was ‘Oh, that’s easy…last time Leafs won the Cup” :D .

  86. 86w183 February 2nd, 2013 at 11:10 am

    I would change 3-thru-7 ———- Granderson, Cano, Tex, Youkilis, Hafner

  87. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 11:10 am

    No matter what happens, I think Youk will be a fun story. My third baseman will probably spend a good proportion of time running through camera bays.

  88. Yankee Trader February 2nd, 2013 at 11:11 am

    Have to go. As always, I enjoy the give and take on the blog.

    Predictions subject to change at any given time: :)

    Ray Lewis will go out a “loser” in tomorrow’s Super Bowl.
    ARod is in for an “offseason” of difficult rehab and a suspension.
    The two AL wildcards will come from the AL West, with those teams feasting on the Astros.

    Have a great day.

    Until later.

  89. 86w183 February 2nd, 2013 at 11:13 am

    A bigger concern is what they’ll look like versus LHP

    Ichiro 9
    Jeter 6
    Yuke 5
    Cano 4
    Tex 3
    Grand 8
    Nunie DH
    Romine 2
    Gardner 7

    Does that work ?? sometimes might mix Diaz in if healthy…. need for a RH more obvious when you put the lineup on paper.

  90. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 11:14 am

    Keon was a straight shooter when everybody was racing around on a curved bender. That Princeton tale has me stunned.

  91. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 11:15 am

    Youkilis’s and Hafner’s splits against righties are actually a bit better than Tex’s over the last three years.

  92. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 11:15 am

    Bye, YT.

  93. J. Alfred Prufrock February 2nd, 2013 at 11:16 am

    Ghostwriter,

    Anything’s possible – that’s why they play out a schedule. Things would have to break optimally, IMO, for that to happen.

    For my part, I can’t really get too jazzed up about one-year mercenaries who have no future with this team, only the other side of the hill to descend, whether they do it here or elsewhere.

    For example, failing to repeat in ’97 was hard to take, but with the kind of youthful core we had, you felt that group was just getting started.

    Now, it seems anyone with any youth and upside to look forward to will likely be gone: Hughes, Joba… Even Cano – the greatest 2B in Yankee history and in the mix for all-time – is only 30, but likely out the door. Nova and Phelps, I suppose. No position players.

    So, in a sense, anything short of winning it all is hollow; you can’t say “Wait until this group really matures….” No one there to send the baseball fan imagination soaring…

  94. Stoneburner - The Return of Wax February 2nd, 2013 at 11:18 am

    Become enraged lohud – - – - -

    Yankees GM Brian Cashman will be a featured speaker at a finance conference next month, and in advance of the conference he conducted an interview with Index Universe. There are a lot of analogies made between baseball and investing and other finance topics, but Cashman does talk about the team’s statistical analysis department, why they are conservative when it comes to Japanese pitchers, undervalued assets, his worst mistakes, all sorts of stuff. The interview gets RAB’s highest level of recommendation, so make sure you check it out.

    The irony is that Cashman uses the same spreadsheets type analysis as the lohud and its Kracken – - – -

  95. J. Alfred Prufrock February 2nd, 2013 at 11:18 am

    jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 11:14 am

    Keon was a straight shooter when everybody was racing around on a curved bender. That Princeton tale has me stunned.
    ///

    Keon could play all 3 zones. Very heady player, one for the ages.

  96. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 11:20 am

    Alfred, that’s why we ran him out of town.

  97. xsoldier56 February 2nd, 2013 at 11:22 am

    To say this scenario is overly optimistic would be an understatement. I like the young players as well and would love to see the Yankees develop a core group of home grown talent like they did in the 90′s. I think they have some possibilities up the middle with prospects. They also have some good young arms who, given the opportunity could be good ML players. I think you need to have this core group of homegrown talent and then build around that with trades and FA’s. Excited to see how this group of minor leaguers currently in the system develops. Should be fun to watch.

  98. Stoneburner - The Return of Wax February 2nd, 2013 at 11:23 am

    IndexUniverse: As you know, Inside ETFs is a financial conference. We’ll have a lot of hedge-fund types, institutional investors and a lot of discussion about hedging. How does a Major League Baseball general manager like yourself hedge risk when it comes to not just high-priced players, but players in general?

    Brian Cashman: The thought process incorporates communication and information as the most important aspects. The more accurate information that you can obtain and dissect, the better informed you’ll be to make safe bets, safe investments. My investments are into players. As an industry, we have seen a radical change. “Moneyball” is a term that people repeat too often—the movie and the book—but essentially we have gotten to the point with technology that we can measure everything that takes place on the field. We’ve hired some really smart people to educate us on what statistics are more meaningful than others. This allows you to make safer bets and manage the risk in a much smarter way than I think the old-school regimes used to do.

    Never mind that the old-school regimes won a WS every four years on average during the 20th Century and all that stuff – - – -

  99. J. Alfred Prufrock February 2nd, 2013 at 11:24 am

    jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 11:10 am

    No matter what happens, I think Youk will be a fun story. My third baseman will probably spend a good proportion of time running through camera bays.
    ///

    Um…wanna trade? :D I’ll take either Encarnacion or Lawrie.

  100. Stoneburner - The Return of Wax February 2nd, 2013 at 11:27 am

    IU: So you have essentially an analytic process, right?

    Cashman: Big time. I’ve been with the team here about 15 years now, and going on my 16th year, and I have changed over time as a department head. One of the changes I’ve made is to take the Yankees into the 21st century. When you see things in the industry improve and change, you’ve got to keep up with the challenges. We have created a quantitative analysis department and hired a director of quantitative analysis. That department has grown to some 14 people who manage a number of different information streams. Not only do they pool that information, but then it is dissected and produced in a meaningful way about what is truly taking place on the field in present performance and then future predictable performance. That has certainly allowed us to make safer, more informed decisions.

    You’ll never be perfect or right all the time, but I think I’m in a much better position to make decisions and be comfortable with those decisions if they are educated-based.

    ****

    So essentially the Yankees are following the Wall Street model of hiring a bunch of MIT shmoes who crunched numbers and made everything fancy with derivatives that helped bring about the 2008 fiasco for the U.S. and World economy – - – -

  101. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 11:27 am

    Xsoldier56, yes. A secret part of me is hoping Rasmus doesn’t do it and Anthony Gose gets to take over. Speed and an Ellis Valentine like arm.

  102. Stoneburner - The Return of Wax February 2nd, 2013 at 11:28 am

    IU: Let’s stick with the building of your team in the same light as people tend to build investment portfolios or even organizations. Where do you tend in terms of baseball to be more conservative, say, in pitching, and where do you tend to be more aggressive? Or is it really a case-by-case scenario?

    Cashman: It is at times case by case, but in a general setting, we’re very conservative. We have learned over time to be very conservative and cautious in acquiring pitching talent from Japan, for instance. It’s a different game there. The mounds are a different size. The pitching routines are different. They have two days off every week, where we don’t. And so the workload, and frankly everything, is completely different over there, even though you’re playing a very similar game of baseball. There are a lot of important differences and therefore the transition from Japan to the States is very volatile. So we have become very conservative in that market.

    We’re very aggressive in team building. You want to be strong up the middle [of the field]. From the amateur world, you’re constantly looking for catching, shortstops and center fielders. Those are the guys that you try to find in the amateur world. You can usually translate those guys to get bigger and stronger. A lot of the backbone of your amateur talent base is going to be gravitating to the guys like that in the front end, and then you move from there.

  103. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 11:29 am

    J. Alfred Prufrock February 2nd, 2013 at 11:16 am

    =============

    I think that you may have spent too much time on this blog, and it’s made you a bit of a pessimist about the near future. I’m not a fan of these 1-year deals either, but they are a means to an end. The club remains competitve, and they are working off the payroll overhang associated with some of these large contracts. I’m actually quite optimistic about 2014, considering the wealth of young pitching that we have waiting in the wings. Obviously, there are a lot of question marks, but there is cause for optimism. I would be a lot more concerned if the Yanks kept signing these big contracts with over the hill players, in order to hang on for another year.

    For my part, I’m not happy about letting Cano walk, but it’s probably the right thing to do. I would like to see Hughes return if he can put together another solid year like last year, and I think he will on both counts. I think that this will finally be Gardner’s year when he stays healthy, and puts it all together.

  104. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 11:32 am

    “Never mind that the old-school regimes won a WS every four years on average during the 20th Century and all that stuff – – – -”

    ———-

    How many years had it been since the Yanks won an AL pennant or a World Series before they won in 1996?

  105. Stoneburner - The Return of Wax February 2nd, 2013 at 11:32 am

    U: What is the key to identifying that new talent and then actually developing it?

    Cashman: In the amateur pool, you have the domestic and international scouting departments, and like any business, you have to have a process, you have to teach that process, and then you have to hire people to execute the process. We do have profiles that we gravitate to. It’s a tool-based assessment on the amateur world. Then once you sign these players, eventually that’s where the quantitative analysis department comes in to conduct performance-based analysis. After a period of time of development, players can have all the tools they want, but they have to translate those tools into consistent success. And that’s what starts to separate the players as they move up the ladder. From AA [minor league ball] on up, performance scouting becomes more vital than the tool scouting for the situation.

  106. Stoneburner - The Return of Wax February 2nd, 2013 at 11:35 am

    How many years had it been since the Yanks won an AL pennant or a World Series before they won in 1996?

    *****

    Let’s try this again – - – -

    every four years on average

    Average means – 25 championships in 100 years under the old regime way – 100 divided by 25 = 4 – so ON AVERAGE once every four years – - – - eeshhh- – - — now back to the original broadcast – - – -

  107. J. Alfred Prufrock February 2nd, 2013 at 11:35 am

    xsoldier56 February 2nd, 2013 at 11:22 am

    To say this scenario is overly optimistic would be an understatement. I like the young players as well and would love to see the Yankees develop a core group of home grown talent like they did in the 90?s. I think they have some possibilities up the middle with prospects. They also have some good young arms who, given the opportunity could be good ML players. I think you need to have this core group of homegrown talent and then build around that with trades and FA’s. Excited to see how this group of minor leaguers currently in the system develops. Should be fun to watch.
    ///

    We do have some good looking arms and position players. Mostly, the cream of the AA group, and of High A, are the ones who could rescue the more proximate future.

    But we lack the isthmus Montero, AJax and Melky could have provided. And the problem with that – other than the obvious one of being that team that was so painlessly ejected by postseason pitching the last two years, instead of one that could have used 2009 as a springboard to a series of great runs – is that they make knee-jerk moves to try and compensate, and imperil that future core.

  108. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 11:35 am

    So essentially the Yankees are following the Wall Street model of hiring a bunch of MIT shmoes who crunched numbers and made everything fancy with derivatives that helped bring about the 2008 fiasco for the U.S. and World economy – – – -

    ===========

    Soooo, the crash of 2008 repudiated quantitative analysis and math? Good to know.

  109. Stoneburner - The Return of Wax February 2nd, 2013 at 11:37 am

    IU: One of the things that we’ll hear a lot about in the financial world is value investing. Everybody wants to find that beaten-down investment that is going to pop for them. Similarly, you’ve had some success in the free-agent market finding that low-cost, high-return player, such as Eric Chavez last year. Anybody out there that you see that has that potential? I know the trading is hot and heavy right now, but can you identify anybody out there that you’re looking at?

    Cashman: I can’t, because it’s slim pickings. This is a very low free agent market. However, I can identify players that have been signed that have great upside. They’re cheap players coming off of whether it’s a subpar year or injuries or what have you. The Chicago Cubs have signed a number of players that fit that idea. I think Nate Schierholtz, the right fielder they signed from the Phillies, is one example. I thought that was a nice coup for them. I thought their signing of free agent Scott Feldman from Texas is another. Texas didn’t pick up his option and Chicago scooped him up. These two players are good low-risk, low-financial investments with higher upside.

    But in terms of what is available to us as we move forward, it’s been slim pickings. Sometimes you have some difficulty, especially if it’s a marketplace that is thin, like this winter. We were a 95-win team, and a lot of times, those players—if it’s a very slim market—want to gravitate to rosters that are a lot thinner than ours, and so we have difficulties at times securing those.

  110. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 11:37 am

    Stoneburner – The Return of Wax February 2nd, 2013 at 11:35 am

    How many years had it been since the Yanks won an AL pennant or a World Series before they won in 1996?

    *****

    Let’s try this again – – – -

    every four years on average

    Average means – 25 championships in 100 years under the old regime way – 100 divided by 25 = 4 – so ON AVERAGE once every four years – – – – eeshhh- – – — now back to the original broadcast – – – -
    ===================

    Thanks. I’m aware of what an average is. Now, can you answer my actual question?

  111. austinmac February 2nd, 2013 at 11:38 am

    Ghostwriter,

    Wealth of young arms? Pineda and his shoulder, Banuelos and his elbow, Betances and his control, Marshall and his low projection are all iffy. Hensley and Depaula are a million miles away. Phelps and Nova are hopefuls but have questions marks either for stuff or command.

    What am I missing? Most analysts say the Yankees are short on minor league pitching.

  112. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 11:39 am

    Alfred, the way you put it, your team is sounding similiar to my hockey contingent. Stone, I hope for your sake Cashman got 95 in stats and isn’t just candy coating all that standard deviation stuff.

  113. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 11:43 am

    Austin, I just was able to put the Nordmende radio on and got, ” I want to kiss you all over, ” by a band called Excel I think.

  114. J. Alfred Prufrock February 2nd, 2013 at 11:44 am

    Ghost,

    Spending time on the blog has nothing to do with my view of this team.

    The mainstream blog perspective, in fact, has tended to run counter to mine. I don’t take my cues from the blog.

    I was one of the people here out in front of the view that Cashman’s self scouting was/is clueless, that his model is naive and extremely limited, and that the Yankees have been making a mess since they made that fatal decision to stash Joba in the bullpen, rather than commit to his development as a starter.

    As for 2014, I’m among the biggest advocates for our more elite system guys; I’ve just seen what they did with Chamberlain and Montero to know not to trust their judgment when it comes to their own young talent.

  115. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 11:45 am

    austinmac February 2nd, 2013 at 11:38 am

    Ghostwriter,

    Wealth of young arms? Pineda and his shoulder, Banuelos and his elbow, Betances and his control, Marshall and his low projection are all iffy. Hensley and Depaula are a million miles away. Phelps and Nova are hopefuls but have questions marks either for stuff or command.

    What am I missing? Most analysts say the Yankees are short on minor league pitching.
    ===================

    I see three young guys that have demonstrated that they can compete in the big leagues (Pineda, Phelps, and Nova). This doesn’t include Hughes. All young players have question marks, even established players have question marks. If you want to discount everybody that we have in the system because there are uncertainties associated with them, then I guess that you have a point.

  116. jmills February 2nd, 2013 at 11:49 am

    Now I’ve got America playing, ” our house, is a very fine house.” – I think it was written with Joni Mitchell in mind.

    Now its Norman Greenbaum, ” Spirit in the sky. “

  117. Ghostwriter February 2nd, 2013 at 11:59 am

    J. Alfred Prufrock February 2nd, 2013 at 11:44 am

    Ghost,

    Spending time on the blog has nothing to do with my view of this team.

    The mainstream blog perspective, in fact, has tended to run counter to mine. I don’t take my cues from the blog.

    I was one of the people here out in front of the view that Cashman’s self scouting was/is clueless, that his model is naive and extremely limited, and that the Yankees have been making a mess since they made that fatal decision to stash Joba in the bullpen, rather than commit to his development as a starter.

    As for 2014, I’m among the biggest advocates for our more elite system guys; I’ve just seen what they did with Chamberlain and Montero to know not to trust their judgment when it comes to their own young talent.
    ===

    Well.. I was kidding a bit about hanging out at this blog too much. Nevertheless, I think that there is a tendency on this blog to miss the forest for the trees. I think that you are a bit overly harsh on some of Cashman’s decisions. I agree with you about Chamberlain (and Montero), but I think tat it’s a mistake to view every single decision as being some major inflection point for the organization. Some of these decisions wind up being fairly minor in the grand scheme of things. More than any particular move, the question is whether the broader strategy is sound, and it seems to me that it is. Cashman has been trying to restock the farm system with pitching and catching prospects, while trimming the payroll, and bringing in veterans to fill the gaps until the kids are ready. It seems to me that he is retoooling the team for the future, while competing them competitive in the present, which is no mean feat.

    And it does seem to me that we do have some pretty exciting prospects that could form a core for the future in Sanchez, Nunez, Williams, Heathcott, etc. Will they be another “Core Four”? Who knows? Maybe they won’t measure up but matching the previous core is a really tall order.

  118. mick February 2nd, 2013 at 11:59 am

    teixeira simply has no incentive to dig down and work at reacquiring his ability to hit to the opposite gap. he’s got the contract . he’s rich. he doesn’t care. seriously.
    to not even try means he doesn’t care. really a waste of talent. he kissed a hall of fame career goodbye with his stubbornness.
    ============================================
    if it wasn’t for his HOF glove, Tex would have been giambied out of here by now.
    i swear all of these guys on twitter are insecure.
    joba, aardsma, granderson now tex always trying to sell something or be liked.
    why doesn’t jeter do it?


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