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A New York Yankees blog by Chad Jennings and the staff of The Journal News


Pinch hitting: Aryeh Gibber

Posted by: Chad Jennings - Posted in Misc on Feb 09, 2013 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

We’re getting close to the end of our Pinch Hitters series, but we still have a few to go, and up next is Aryeh Gibber. He’s another displaced Yankees fan, a 35-year-old who went to school in Rhode Island and worked in Virginia before settling in Michigan with his wife and four kids. He’s been there since 2008 and wrote that he’s “shivered through several unfortunate nights at Comerica Park during the last two Octobers.”

For his post, Aryeh got sentimental. That was kind of the point. He calls his post: The All-Sentimental Team.

Don Mattingly. Derek Jeter. Dave Winfield. Rickey Henderson. Mariano Rivera. Robinson Cano. And the list goes on. Headline-grabbing stars and Cooperstown-bound immortals, the transcendent figures that have thrilled and captivated the Yankees fan base over the last quarter-century, and their household names roll off the tongues of even the most casual fan.

And yet isn’t it true that the roots of visceral fandom so often originate with far lesser lights of the baseball world? The bond between a baseball fan and the game he/she loves is forged by uniquely personal experiences and perspectives. Each of us has those individual players who have captured our imagination, caught our fancy and become — for one quirky reason or another — infinitely more significant to us as fans than they will ever be to the rest of the baseball establishment.

It might be a shared birthday or name, or a great catch made at the first game you ever attended. Everybody has his or her own story — a chance meeting at the airport, a signed ball tossed cheerfully to a youngster hanging precariously over a bullpen fence – and whatever the history, these often unremarkable players illustrate, and sometimes even define, our formative experiences as fans learning to love the grand old game.

With another baseball season almost upon us, I took a whimsical stroll down Memory Lane and created the (first ever?) All-Sentimental Team. No one in this lineup will find his way to Cooperstown without a map, but in two and a half decades of embracing the Yankees through the proverbial thick (The Core Four years) and thin (Wayne Tolleson, Rafael Santana and Alvaro Espinoza in the middle of the infield), these are the players who have has helped make baseball not just the national pastime, but my personal pastime as well.

C Sal Fasano – When my oldest son was 3 years old, I took him to Harbor Park in Norfolk, VA to see the Columbus Clippers (the Yankees AAA farm team at the time) do battle with the Norfolk Tides. It was his first “Yankees” game, and he looked quite the part, decked out smartly in a No. 2 jersey and fitted cap. As the game ended and we lingered near the railing, the Clippers’ veteran catcher spied my son and walked over to us. “Hey buddy, is this your first game?” As my son nodded in awe, Sal reached into the dugout for a baseball, tossed it to us and called over his shoulder, “Great to meet you little guy!” Sal Fasano’s big-league Yankees career may have consisted of only 28 games in 2006, but he’s a surefire, first-ballot All Sentimental Team Hall of Famer for me.

1B Bill Skowron – “Moose” played his last game for the Yankees 15 years before I was born, but on a warm spring night in Chicago in 1988, my father secured Golden Box tickets ($10.50!) for us to watch the visiting Yankees play the Chicago White Sox at Comiskey Park. A dignified older gentleman sat down next to us, and within an inning or two, suspicions in our row were confirmed — it was former stalwart, all-star first baseman for the Yankees of the 50′s and 60′s. Pleasantries were exchanged, memories shared, scorecards signed, and the crew-cut framed face I knew so well from pictures sprang vividly to life.

2B Mariano Duncan – There was Red Smith and Roger Angell, David Halberstam and George Will, Roger Kahn and Thomas Boswell, Bill James and Michael Lewis. For more than a century, great writers have tried to capture the essence of baseball in flowery prose. And then along came Mariano Duncan in 1996 to distill generations of baseball wisdom into one profound, iconic axiom while managing to crystallize the ethos of the mid-late nineties Yankees at the very same time: “We play today. We win today. Das’ it.” Mariano Duncan has spoken.

3B Mike Pagliarulo – At the age of 8, I hand-wrote a heartfelt missive expressing my avid support of the Yankees and mailed it to “Yankee Stadium, Bronx, NY 10451.” A few weeks later the mailman delivered a treasure in return: an impressive-looking letter on team stationary thanking me for my support and a black and white, autographed photo of Mike Pagliarulo. That the signature was clearly a facsimile never dawned on me. I had my first autograph! Pags ripped off consecutive seasons of 19, 28, 32 and 15 home runs (cumulative batting average of .232, but we took what we got in the moribund eighties…), and the esteem in which I held my keepsake skyrocketed. A wonderful epilogue: While a college student in Providence, RI, I met the legendary Mike Pagliarulo in person at the New England Sports and Business Expo. He turned out to be as friendly and personable as I had always imagined… and the signature I got the second time around was real!

SS Bobby Meacham – Is there another feeling quite like peeling open a brand new package of Topps? Not for a young baseball fan in the eighties, there isn’t. Who would be lurking just beneath the wax paper wrapping? Would Donnie Baseball’s determined visage and generous eye black peer back at me? Did I even dare to dream of a crouching Rickey Henderson? Nope. It was Bobby Meacham. It was always Bobby Meacham. Seemingly in every pack I bought. In fact — an early lesson in the law of diminishing returns — from 1984-1988 I am confident that I bought at least two Bobby Meacham cards for every home run he struck.

OF Mel Hall – I agonized over including Mel Hall on this team now that he has proven himself rather unsavory and indefensible as a human being. But, what can I do? I was there on Memorial Day, 1991. Perhaps one of the best things about Memory Lane is how much simpler and more pleasant everything still appears. Ensconced in the upper deck of Yankee Stadium as the Yanks and Red Sox did battle below, I watched Jeff Reardon jog to the mound with a 5-3 lead to close out what appeared to be another desultory New York loss. But Hensley Meulens singled, and so did Kevin Maas. And when Mel Hall unfurled his trademark lefty swing and drilled a 3-run, game-winning home run into the right field stands, the Stadium denizens found their collective voice and bedlam ensued.

OF Roberto Kelly – Disclaimer: I was obsessed with Rickey Henderson as a youth, possibly to an unhealthy degree. I once waited two and a half hours to have Rickey sign my copy of his autobiography (a less than stellar piece of literature which I recently re-read; remarkable how passages that once read as gallant heroism now read as stunning narcissism, but I digress…), and my binder of 250+ Rickey Henderson cards (no doubles!) remains among my most treasured, if absurd, possessions. When I heard that Rickey Henderson was moving over to left field and the hallowed grounds of center field at Yankee Stadium would be patrolled by a talented youngster Roberto Kelly… well! If Rickey was yielding to a mortal human, I could only assume this Roberto Kelly was a rare blend of Mays, Mantle and Williams. I barely made it through winter anticipating the inevitable heroics of one Roberto Kelly. Turned out he was… Roberto Kelly. A nice player on some bad teams, but ultimately most noteworthy for his role as trade bait for Paul O’Neill a few years later.

OF Jesse Barfield – Never the feared slugger with the Yankees that he briefly was with the Blue Jays, Jesse Barfield was beset by injuries and a .231 batting average in four seasons in Pinstripes. But oh, how I loved to watch Jesse Barfield throw a baseball. Even after a routine fly ball, his rifle arm would smoothly uncoil, and he would uncork a strike toward the infield the likes of which most Yankee pitchers at the time could only dream of.

DH Kevin Maas – Who can forget the summer of 1990 when rookie Kevin began belting home runs into the right field stands at a record pace and all things seemed possible? Ten homers in 72 AB’s, and for a while it was simply a matter of determining where in Monument Park the Kevin Maas plaque would ultimately reside. Oh well.

SP Tommy John – Long before the surgery that bears his name became de rigeur in baseball circles, I simply could never escape Tommy John. If I went to a Yankee game in the ’80′s, Tommy John would pitch. Every time. I hoped for Rick Rhoden, wished for Andy Hawkins, and would have settled for Chuck Cary. But no. Tommy John was to starting pitchers what Bobby Meacham was to baseball cards.

SP Melido Perez – At every game I attend, I take my seat convinced today is the day I will witness a no-hitter. It’s never happened, never even close. But the longest I ever got to wait in suspense before watching a ball land safely and having to mutter the dreaded, “There goes the no-hitter,” was when Melido Perez blanked the opposition for five innings at Yankee Stadium. I can’t remember who they played, I don’t recall anyone else being caught up in the drama, and I’m pretty sure the Yankees lost. But when I think of narrow misses, I think of Melido Perez throwing up zeroes for one glorious night in the Bronx. Well, for five innings anyway.

SP Dennis Rasmussen – With Rickey Henderson firmly entrenched as my favorite player and Don Mattingly close behind, the pint-sized purist in me was bothered by not having a favorite pitcher. I pored over my Yankee yearbook, and after a gravely serious consultation with my older sister, I settled on Dennis Rasmussen for no other reason than his impressive-sounding name. Shockingly, he rewarded my support with an 18-6, 3.88 season that came out of nowhere before returning to more routine Dennis Rasmussen-ness.

SP David Phelps – In my time following the team, there has only been one active Yankee with whom I’ve shared my birthday, October 9. It’s David Phelps. So ask all the questions you’d like: Does he have a future with the team? Rotation or long relief? Should he be dangled as trade bait? But David Phelps will always have a spot on this All-Sentimental Team’s roster.

RP Cecilio Guante – True story: In Ninth Grade my history teacher turned to me during a lesson review and said, “Mr. Gibber, the assassination of which Archduke of the Austro-Hungarian Empire was the immediate cause of the outbreak of World War I?” And without hesitation I responded, “Cecilio Guante.” I can’t even really explain it, but this happened.

RP Rick Cerone – I know, I know. Rick Cerone was a workmanlike catcher who hit .249 in 7 mostly nondescript seasons with the Yankees and has no place on any team’s mound. But while on a family trip to Detroit in 1987 my father scalped outrageously overpriced tickets for the two of us to spend the afternoon obstructed by a mammoth light transformer at the old Tigers Stadium. The Yankees were mauled 15-4, and in the ninth inning ,out came Rick Cerone to give the battered Yankee bullpen a rest. 1 IP, 0 H, 1 BB, 0 R. Maybe they should have had him start.

…But enough about me, what about you? With the dawn of another Baseball New Year, why not indulge in a moment’s break from WAR calculations, injury updates, luxury tax thresholds and PED inquiries and instead share some of the moments, players and experiences that have made the fan you are today?

Associated Press photo

 
 

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90 Responses to “Pinch hitting: Aryeh Gibber”

  1. austinmac February 9th, 2013 at 9:14 am

    That was one of my favorite guest posts. It reminded me when I chatted with Clete Boyer. Good memories. Thanks.

  2. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 9:18 am

    “Hopefully Trisha and others were among those who heeded them and prepared.”

    mtu-

    “Blizzard struck transmission lines; R.I. power failures may last days”

    http://news.providencejournal......-days.html

  3. MaineYankee February 9th, 2013 at 9:18 am

    The reason Portland is getting so much snow is because randy is there.

    If they were smart they would send him back to the Cape where he belongs.

  4. MTU February 9th, 2013 at 9:21 am

    Maine-

    Glad you’re OK.

    Thanks for checking in.

  5. MTU February 9th, 2013 at 9:24 am

    Off to walk the mopheads.

    Catch you all later.

  6. MaineYankee February 9th, 2013 at 9:24 am

    MTU

    OK?

    Just a snow storm.

    Life in Maine in the winter.

    So far we’ve got 9″.

    Drifting is more of a problem than the amount.

    Plows on and ready to work.

  7. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 9:25 am

    “And without hesitation I responded, “Cecilio Guante.” I can’t even really explain it, but this happened.”

    with your sense of humor, you’re gonna love the hal yankees this summer and next :)

  8. PacoDooley February 9th, 2013 at 9:27 am

    Great ride down recent memory lane. I saw most of these guys play in person as a teen – most memorable was seeing Perez crank out an occasional eephus pitch – usually successfully. Of course, that season by Maas will forever be legendary in terms of the hopes the brought and later dashed.

  9. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 9:31 am

    “The reason Portland is getting so much snow is because randy is there.”

    mtu-

    maine yankee is just jealous because i know how to make it snow more than he does :)

  10. Cashmoney February 9th, 2013 at 9:37 am

    I would put Maas in CF or SS, the guy was multi-talented and an immense threat on the base path, for those who are NE, be safe and you can always dig your car out of 3 feet snow next week.

    Cashmoney reporting from NYC, no moar snow.

  11. Doreen February 9th, 2013 at 9:38 am

    I really enjoyed this guest post. Thanks!

  12. blake February 9th, 2013 at 9:39 am

    Really nice post.

  13. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 9:40 am

    doreen -

    how’s the tiguan in snow?

  14. MaineYankee February 9th, 2013 at 9:40 am

    randy

    The last thing I’m jealous of is you. :lol:

  15. Cashmoney February 9th, 2013 at 9:41 am

    I believe that was around memorial day weekend… Hall hit the mezzanine section in RF porch to bring us probably 10 game behind the Sox. one of the shining moments of a dark Yankee Childhood.

  16. MaineYankee February 9th, 2013 at 9:42 am

    Doreen

    I hope the snowblower is in good running order.

    No more shoveling is a good thing.

  17. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 9:57 am

    “The last thing I’m jealous of is you”

    maine yankee-

    are you still mad at me because i told you it was a bad idea to dress up as a moose in maine for halloween during hunting season.

  18. Tar February 9th, 2013 at 9:57 am

    Good post Aryeh, thanks.

    Cash

    I think it was you who reminisced about Strawberry yesterday. I completely agree. I went to many games at Shea back in the day, and he is by far the most impressive HR hitter I have ever seen.

  19. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 9:59 am

    doreen-

    my honda fit is real good in the snow.

    it sits there real nice:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/1.....hotostream

  20. J. Alfred Prufrock February 9th, 2013 at 10:01 am

    RP Cecilio Guante – True story: In Ninth Grade my history teacher turned to me during a lesson review and said, “Mr. Gibber, the assassination of which Archduke of the Austro-Hungarian Empire was the immediate cause of the outbreak of World War I?” And without hesitation I responded, “Cecilio Guante.” I can’t even really explain it, but this happened.

    ///

    This is a beaut. Enjoyed the whole post, well done.

  21. Cashmoney February 9th, 2013 at 10:07 am

    lol what car?

    Tar, on most summer nights in those days, if both teams are on, I would switch the station from WPIX to I think 9 to see Strawberry’s AB then promptly switch back where the Yanks are invariably down by 4 or 5 runs behind the elite arms of Witt, Perez, Lapointe, Hawkins, J.Johnson, Wade Taylor etc, etc… He consistently hit majestic line drives over 400 feet. numbers simply can not quantify the fear he brought to any given pitchers… he was one of the few that was truly gifted.

  22. Rich in NJ February 9th, 2013 at 10:09 am

    I believe that was around memorial day weekend… Hall hit the mezzanine section in RF porch to bring us probably 10 game behind the Sox. one of the shining moments of a dark Yankee Childhood.
    -
    Yes, I was completing my last law school final (a take-home employment law final) at the kitchen table of my old condo (where John Sterling also lived), and had a102 fever and strep throat, listening to the game on the radio during breaks.

  23. Doreen February 9th, 2013 at 10:11 am

    Randy that picture is hysterical. FortunAtely I haven’t had to drive the Tiguan in huge amounts of snow, but I love driving it on the highway. However, there have been a couple of times when I was driving a lot and filling up my tank that I’d see a Fit on the road and think to myself, randy had the right idea! But overall, the Tiguan really does suit me.

    Maine Yankee, unfortunately the snow blower chose to be recalcitrant this morning. The snow shoveler (my husband) is none too happy. Because this has happened to us before, we bought a new snow blower two winters ago and took every precaution to “summerize” it. No luck. So off to the repairman he will go.

  24. Cashmoney February 9th, 2013 at 10:15 am

    Rich, was John Miller partner to Sterling at that time or Kay had already kicked in, I can’t remember.

  25. MaineYankee February 9th, 2013 at 10:17 am

    Doreen

    Maine Yankee, unfortunately the snow blower chose to be recalcitrant this morning. The snow shoveler (my husband) is none too happy. Because this has happened to us before, we bought a new snow blower two winters ago and took every precaution to “summerize” it. No luck. So off to the repairman he will go.

    ——————————————————–

    I remember you bought a new snowblower after shoveling over your head.

    I would be none to happy either if I went back to shoveling.

    Maybe it’s time to find a new repairman or invite him over for the next storm.

    When he arrives give him a shovel. :D :

  26. Rich in NJ February 9th, 2013 at 10:32 am

    Cash

    I don’t recall. Jay Johnstone?

  27. Chip February 9th, 2013 at 10:32 am

    None of Hal’s comments yesterday were particularly heartening for me as a Yankee fan:

    1. He wants Cano to be a Yankee for life. Great – because long term contracts for big money have worked out so well for this team.

    2. He bristles at the notion that the Yankees didn’t spend money; saying that Andy, Youk and Kuroda weren’t cheap signings. Technically he’s right, but he spent to maintain the status quo, not to improve the team.

    The only comment I found funny was where he said he’s “concerned” regarding the Alex stuff but it’s ok because he’s a big fan of Youk and went on to essentially say that as a human being Kevin is everything Alex isn’t.

  28. Doreen February 9th, 2013 at 10:35 am

    Maine Yankee

    I just hope he can tell us what we are doing wrong. Clearly we are snowblower-challenged people! LOL

  29. Doreen February 9th, 2013 at 10:40 am

    Chip, my newspaper didn’t include anything about Youkilis beyond his being one of the players getting a one year deal rather than signing multi-year deals for Swisher, Martin, etc. No talk about Youk as an individual.

  30. Chip February 9th, 2013 at 10:45 am

    Doreen,

    See the included link:

    http://espn.go.com/boston/mlb/.....-situation

  31. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 10:50 am

    “Randy that picture is hysterical. FortunAtely I haven’t had to drive the Tiguan in huge amounts of snow, but I love driving it on the highway”

    doreen-

    if you want to see a mad 12 year old , you should see him helping me shovel after i changed the netflix password and told him he could have it as soon as we finish the driveway :)

    it doesn’t help when i tell him that when i was eight , my friends and i used to knock on doors and shovel driveways for a quarter.

    he said that must have been before snow blowers were invented :)

  32. Ys Guy February 9th, 2013 at 10:55 am

    ok the house is shoveled the car is clean the entire wrap-around sidewalk at my buisness is shoveled, i cleared out the fireplug and even shoveled into the street so people can use the crosswalk.

    now a cup of coffee and 3 asperin for my back and im done!

  33. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 10:58 am

    “No talk about Youk as an individual.”

    i’m pretty sure he’s on the endangered species list.

    he might be the last one left.

  34. TopChuckie February 9th, 2013 at 10:58 am

    Along the same lines as Mel Hall, and with the same disclaimer, Jim Leyritz will always be one of my sentimental favorites, obviously the clutch heroics, but I also always liked his attitude and style, with the bat spin after each pitch.

  35. Doreen February 9th, 2013 at 11:00 am

    Thanks, Chip. My article did not have all the direct quotes yours did.

    I did not read his pro Youk comments as anti Alex, though. The juxtaposition of the Alex info right before the quote about Youk allows the reader to put their own spin, perhaps. Or perhaps the spin of the writer. Because aside from he PED stuff, Alex is all those things he said of Youkilis.

    The Alex situation has to be causing fits, though, to say the least. I figure the Yankees thought that was something they’d already dealt with.

    I am reserving judgment on the latest because it just seems utterly unfathomable for Alex, or anyone, to be so stupid as to get himself mixed up to the degree that has been reported. And considering that the info on all the others is a lot less detailed, you have to wonder.

  36. DONNYBROOK February 9th, 2013 at 11:01 am

    Everytime Hal opens his yap, the silver spoon bumps the microphone. He has No feeling for the fans, and No feeling for The Game. The guy is also an absolute Zero on the personality scale to boot.

  37. Ys Guy February 9th, 2013 at 11:01 am

    the sun is shining brightly on the snow out there now, it’s really a beautiful morning out.

    (probably not quite as beautiful until after you finish the shoveling.)

    :)

  38. comnsnse February 9th, 2013 at 11:05 am

    1949 Red Sox come into stadium 1 game ahead with two to play.

    First game I believe facing Ellis Kinder who had won 23 to date. Yanks win and while the memory is a little hazy I believe it was Johnny Lindell hitting a HR that helped them win.

    It was also Joe DiMaggio day! We’re tied with one to play for the pennant!

    Sunday, again I believe Mel Parnell a great lefty starts,he’s 25-7 to date,Yanks win in large part with a flare to right center by Jerry Coleman!

    We win the pennant!

    One other great one of many, I was in attendance when Allie Reynolds pitched his no hitter against the Sox. That was the game where on the final out Berra dropped a high pop near the dugout.

    On the next play,same popup Berra catches it preserving the no hitter.

    The batter I believe was Ted Williams!

    Final note, we got the tickets in 49 because my Dad’s company was on strike,it certainly brightened the day!

  39. Chip February 9th, 2013 at 11:06 am

    Doreen February 9th, 2013 at 11:00 am

    Thanks, Chip. My article did not have all the direct quotes yours did.

    I did not read his pro Youk comments as anti Alex, though. The juxtaposition of the Alex info right before the quote about Youk allows the reader to put their own spin, perhaps. Or perhaps the spin of the writer. Because aside from he PED stuff, Alex is all those things he said of Youkilis.
    ———————-

    Oh, I wasn’t saying Hal meant it to be a shot at Alex – I just found it interesting that in describing Youk it was everything that Alex isn’t.

  40. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 11:06 am

    ys guy-

    how much would you’d pay to watch hal and hank shovel a driveway ?

  41. pat February 9th, 2013 at 11:06 am

    21″ just a few miles north of Yankee Stadium.

    Since my son is shoveling our neighbors driveways before doing ours “because they pay me”, is it wrong if I charge him for lunch today?

  42. Ys Guy February 9th, 2013 at 11:08 am

    so it looks like the New Times is seriously considering handing the clinics notes over the MLB’s investigators

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02......html?_r=0

  43. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 11:11 am

    “Since my son is shoveling our neighbors driveways before doing ours “because they pay me”, is it wrong if I charge him for lunch today?”

    no, and changing all passwords on streaming video is perfectly ok too :)

  44. Ys Guy February 9th, 2013 at 11:11 am

    randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 11:06 am

    ys guy-

    how much would you’d pay to watch hal and hank shovel a driveway ?
    =======================================
    that would be funny.

    they should just pay carl pavano to do it for them!

    :)

  45. jacksquat February 9th, 2013 at 11:13 am

    pat February 9th, 2013 at 11:06 am
    21? just a few miles north of Yankee Stadium.

    Since my son is shoveling our neighbors driveways before doing ours “because they pay me”, is it wrong if I charge him for lunch today?

    I’d charge him rent before reentry. :D

  46. MaineYankee February 9th, 2013 at 11:13 am

    Doreen

    If randy was any kind of friend he would come down and help you shovel.

  47. Rich in NJ February 9th, 2013 at 11:14 am

    Since my son is shoveling our neighbors driveways before doing ours “because they pay me”, is it wrong if I charge him for lunch today?
    -

    Make him buy you lunch with the money.

  48. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 11:15 am

    “they should just pay carl pavano to do it for them!”

    the problem with that is when pavano hurt himself shoveling, hank might go out and shoot him like one of his horses.

    then hal would be ticked off because funerals are so expensive.

  49. Frankg February 9th, 2013 at 11:15 am

    Must have been in the 1950s. I lived in a Detroit suburb and didn’t go to many Tiger games because we were Yankee fans and didn’t have much money. Went to see the St. Louis Browns, an AL team at the time, play the Tigers. In to pitch in relief came the ledgendary Satchel Paige. What a thrill! This tall back player with a windmill windup and the famous “slip pitch.” I converted to pitcher a short time later, I’m sure in part because I was inspired by him.

    Other big thrill: Mickey Mantle hitting a mamouth HR off of Paul Foytack of the Tigers that bounced off of the light towers on the rightfield roof and then fell to the street behind the stadium. The arc of that ball was hard to follow because it was so high it blended with the sky. Never forgot the moment.

    Thanks for letting us share memories. Wish we got to see more of Edwar Ramirez.

  50. MaineYankee February 9th, 2013 at 11:17 am

    randy

    it doesn’t help when i tell him that when i was eight , my friends and i used to knock on doors and shovel driveways for a quarter.

    ——————————————————————————-

    I thought back then they just used a big roller on the snow.

  51. Doreen February 9th, 2013 at 11:18 am

    Randy those 12 year olds have all the answers. But you sure know how to hit a kid where it hurts most.

    All I will say about the Yankees for the last year or so they are certainly challenging the fan base, or a portion thereof, anyway. I’m taking the easy way out and choosing to be skeptically optimistic

  52. comnsnse February 9th, 2013 at 11:19 am

    Donnybrook, very apt description of Hal,whereas Hank the “imbiber” he of the Aroid extension and older is also a disinterested fellow.

    Perhaps the one sister’s husband who married the ex landscaper should assume control.Now a vice president of something or other.

    At the very lease we’ll know the field is in tip top shape! ;)

  53. Doreen February 9th, 2013 at 11:22 am

    Chip I disagree. Alex loves to pay baseball, has taken a leadership role with some of the younger players and works very hard at his craft. The problem is the PED stuff. And what proof does anyone have that Youk hasn’t indulged?

    It is very sad, the entire Arod sutuation.

  54. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 11:23 am

    “I thought back then they just used a big roller on the snow.”

    wow,i see it’s 10 degrees up in your neck of the woods.

    i’m surprised you can get your frozen fingers in that rotary phone to do internet dial up :)

  55. Chip February 9th, 2013 at 11:25 am

    Doreen February 9th, 2013 at 11:22 am

    Chip I disagree. Alex loves to pay baseball, has taken a leadership role with some of the younger players and works very hard at his craft. The problem is the PED stuff. And what proof does anyone have that Youk hasn’t indulged?

    It is very sad, the entire Arod sutuation.
    ————————

    Unfortunately several of the players that he’s taken under his wing (Melky, Cervelli) have wound up being linked to this clinic as well – I’m terrified that Cano is on that list too.

  56. MaineYankee February 9th, 2013 at 11:27 am

    randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 11:23 am
    “I thought back then they just used a big roller on the snow.”

    wow,i see it’s 10 degrees up in your neck of the woods.

    i’m surprised you can get your frozen fingers in that rotary phone to do internet dial up

    —————————————————————-

    Not a problem.

    I just pick up the receiver and let the operator in Bryant Pond do the dialing.

  57. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 11:28 am

    “I just pick up the receiver and let the operator in Bryant Pond do the dialing.”

    does everyone get the same web site or is there a special app for a party line?

  58. comnsnse February 9th, 2013 at 11:30 am

    FrankG., Mantle’s mammoth HR that hit the upper deck façade off Pedro ramos almost went out of the stadium.

    Or his titanic dinger off the then Washington Senators where the ball was measured at 565 ft. clipping the top of the scoreboard might have been off Chuck Stobbs but not sure!

    The only MAD Mantle ever took was alcohol,not necessarily performance enhancing!

    Mantle was a bigger version of a truly great Dodger CF named Pete Reiser whose career was cut short by injuries suffered playing all out and crashing into outfield walls. I believe he would have been a HOF’er if his time was not cut short. Same tools a Mickey.

    Is there anyone here who is old enough to know what I’m talking about? ;)

  59. Doreen February 9th, 2013 at 11:33 am

    Chip, I hope not about Cano.

  60. MaineYankee February 9th, 2013 at 11:35 am

    randy

    Web site? app?

    Start speaking english.

    We don’t speak Massglish.

  61. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 11:36 am

    doreen-

    i have a bad feeling about cano. it’s not just alex, he trained with a guy in the DR who was banned from baseball for PEDS.

  62. Bronx Jeers February 9th, 2013 at 11:37 am

    Very entertaining post today. Probably my favorite so far.

  63. jacksquat February 9th, 2013 at 11:38 am

    Chip February 9th, 2013 at 11:25 am

    Unfortunately several of the players that he’s taken under his wing (Melky, Cervelli) have wound up being linked to this clinic as well – I’m terrified that Cano is on that list too.

    Cano doesn’t train with Arod afaik, he runs his own camp in the DR.

  64. MaineYankee February 9th, 2013 at 11:43 am

    Until they make the penalty really hurt the players will still use PED’s.

    The reward is too great versus the penalty.

  65. MaineYankee February 9th, 2013 at 11:49 am

    Got to go hitch up the horses and use the roller to pack the snow so we can use the sleigh to get out to town.

  66. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 11:49 am

    “Start speaking english.

    We don’t speak Massglish.”

    maine yankee-

    apps are pissah!

    they have any iphone stores up there yet?

  67. Doreen February 9th, 2013 at 11:49 am

    Well, the cynical part of me hopes that if Cano did in fact partake, that it at least come out before he is signed.

    Wouldn’t it be just hunky dory if he Yankees break their long-standing policy on extending players for Cano, only to be stuck again?

    I did not know he trained with anyone besides his father in the DR. however, it is apparent that PEDs are pretty commonly used in the DR.

    There’s no shock to the system anymore when players are alleged to have used PEDs.

  68. Tar February 9th, 2013 at 11:50 am

    “Is there anyone here who is old enough to know what I’m talking about?”

    I’m not quite that ancient ( :D ) But I really do appreciate you talking about it.

  69. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 11:51 am

    “Is there anyone here who is old enough to know what I’m talking about”

    the problem is if there’s anyone that old, they have trouble remembering the question :)

  70. randy l. February 9th, 2013 at 11:54 am

    doreen-

    cano ex trainer with PED problems
    http://riveraveblues.com/2009/.....inal-8317/

  71. jmills February 9th, 2013 at 11:56 am

    Its fantasy land out there. Hope the storm was benign for one and all. Going back out there – I’m a closet shoveling freak.

  72. pat February 9th, 2013 at 12:01 pm

    If a player had the numbers but admitted they used “androstenedione as part of a supplement pack until the outcry over Mark McGwire’s use” and “briefly experimented with amphetamines until they were banned in 2006.” is that enough to keep them from the Hall of Fame?

  73. tomingeorgia February 9th, 2013 at 12:06 pm

    Read where Pete Reiser once fracture his skull in a collision with a concrete wall, picked himself up and threw the runner out at third before missing the rest of the season. He was just before my time of baseball awareness, but his fame lingered on. Leo Durocher likened him in his pre-injury years, to Willie Mays. Helluva ballplayer.

  74. jmills February 9th, 2013 at 12:09 pm

    Hey, Tom, had to look up your word, ” side-winder. ” Nothing like being sent to Oxford, thanks.

  75. Frankg February 9th, 2013 at 12:14 pm

    I’ve read about Pete Rieser and that some consider him one of the best players ever, but would love to see some footage to see how he compares to Mantle and others. We tend to think that the best players are the current ones, but that may not be completely true. Sorry I did not live in NYC when they had three, often times, great teams.

  76. Doreen February 9th, 2013 at 12:15 pm

    Randy,

    Got my fingers crossed.

  77. J. Alfred Prufrock February 9th, 2013 at 12:21 pm

    “Presinal worked with Rodriguez and approximately 20 other Dominican stars, including Albert Pujols, Adrian Beltre, Ortiz, Perez and Alou, in early February in Boca Chica, a small town about 30 minutes from Santo Domingo. He ran the players through numerous drills and administered massages to several of them before and after the workouts.”

    -ESPN article

  78. J. Alfred Prufrock February 9th, 2013 at 12:23 pm

    Sorry, here’s link to that story that includes Pujols as having worked with Presinal (a name which sounds unnervingly like a pharmaceutical)

    http://sports.espn.go.com/espn.....id=3942011

  79. Chip February 9th, 2013 at 12:23 pm

    If I was handing out a contract to a player, let’s use Cano as an example, I would put in there a proviso that says if he’s busted for PEDs then the following year becomes a team option year, with a buyout of 1/10th the AAV of the contract. If the team picks up the option, then all future years are locked in.

    You put the time limit in there so that you don’t have a situation where he’s suspended this year and then 3 years down the road when his game slips you can void the contract saying “we were contemplating this from the day he was suspended.”

    This doesn’t have to be collectively bargained, teams put in different options with different provisions all the time, this would be similar to that.

    The only player who doesn’t sign such a provision is one who is afraid of being busted for steroids anyway – so if Cano were to say “hell no” then Hal and Cash and Levine would know that there’s a strong likelihood of Cano being on steroids.

  80. J. Alfred Prufrock February 9th, 2013 at 12:26 pm

    Meanwhile, King Richard III’s actual remains reportedly were found in an English parking lot, giving new resonance to NYC’s own “Shakespeare in the Parking Lot,” (having seen them, sadly, their work does not).

  81. jmills February 9th, 2013 at 12:32 pm

    Hey, Alfred, sent u an e-mail. Some Canadian had the DNA to confirm Richard. Was just lost in Mr. Gibber’s fine post. I remember Barfield throwing out Murcer at home on the dime to Whitt in the first inning. Kubek was gushing.

  82. J. Alfred Prufrock February 9th, 2013 at 12:38 pm

    mills,

    The greatest stage actor in the world was/is doing Richard III in London. Not sure if that show concluded, but if it has not, they’re gonna love the timing. :D

    I’m outta here to watch Sid & Co play an afternoon game. (on television, that is). I’ll check email before settling in front of the set :D

  83. jmills February 9th, 2013 at 12:38 pm

    Christopher Plumber has long since cleaned himself up from his John Barrymore fixation and is still doing fine work. I’m lucky to live between Stratford and Shaw country at Niagara. But today is the day for the physical. Snow, here I come!

  84. Nick in SF February 9th, 2013 at 12:40 pm

    Very nice guest post, thank you!

  85. J. Alfred Prufrock February 9th, 2013 at 12:46 pm

    mills,

    I saw Plumber do probably the finest Lear I’ve seen, and I’ve also seen Jacoby and Ian McKellen (it’s a close three-way tie, actually, but Plumber, I just sat in my seat after it ended and couldn’t really move for about 5 minutes).

    The best stage actor in the world, though, is of course, the peerless Mark Rylance.

  86. J. Alfred Prufrock February 9th, 2013 at 1:01 pm

    *Plummer, lol

  87. comnsnse February 9th, 2013 at 1:34 pm

    Guys, I believe it’s “Plummer” and he doesn’t fix toilets! ;)

    Aside to Frank and Tommy, thank goodness there are some here who do not necessarily have to have seen a player play to remember.

    The “Youts” here seem more interested in snow,hopefully only the stuff blanketing the east coast.

    Prufrock, you seriously believe that Plummer is a greater stage performer than Olivier. When Kenneth Branagh was acting and not directing he was terrific as well.

  88. Jorge Mexico February 9th, 2013 at 2:26 pm

    A great post, Aryeh. I can’t make a full sentimental-team, but there is one former Yankees pitcher that I’ll always remember: Eduardo Figueroa.
    After the 1975 season, Ed and Mickey Rivers were traded to the Yankees for Bobby Bonds, and he had 3 very good season in pinstripes. Then, injuries came.
    By mid 80′s, Ed came to pitch for my home team, Leones de Yucatán, AAA Mexican Summer League. As a die-hard Yankees fan, I went to the park each time Figueroa went to the mound. And some of those nights I even had the pleasure to talk to him after the game. He was a gentleman with the fans.
    He liked his days in México. In fact, as far as I know, he owns 2 mexican restaurants in San Juan

  89. ajw February 9th, 2013 at 6:35 pm

    Mine were the the following:

    C: Thurman Munson
    1B: Don Mattingly
    2B: Willie Randolph
    SS: Gene Michael
    3B: Craig Nettles
    LF: Roy White
    CF: Mickey Rivers
    RF: Reggie Jackson/Lou Piniella
    SP: Ron Guidry
    SP: Don Gullett
    SP: Ed Figueroa
    SP: Catfish Hunter
    Bullpen: Goose Gossage
    Bullpen: Dick Tidrow
    Bullpen: Sparky Lyle

  90. ryneduren February 10th, 2013 at 5:27 pm

    Here’s my team, spanning my own many decades:

    C: Thurman Munson
    1B: Steve Balboni
    2B: Bobby Richardson
    SS: Andre Robertson
    3B: Clete Boyer
    LF: Roy White
    CF: Mickey Mantle
    RF: Hank Bauer
    SP: Ron Guidry
    SP: Eli Grba
    SP: Mel Stottlemyre
    SP: Catfish Hunter
    Bullpen: Goose Gossage
    Bullpen: Ryne Duren
    Bullpen: Joba Chamberlin


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