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Know your limits: Hafner, Nunez, Jeter and Johnson

Posted by: Chad Jennings - Posted in Misc on Feb 17, 2013 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

A few notes about lineup versatility…

• Because of lingering health concerns, Travis Hafner basically stopped going through any defensive drills while he was in Cleveland, and the Yankees have no plans of changing that. Joe Girardi said that Hafner is strictly a DH and won’t be tested in the field to be so much as a backup first baseman. “He’s a DH,” Girardi said.

• Eduardo Nunez will also be limited in the field. For now, the Yankees plan to stick with their idea of keeping Nunez at shortstop. Girardi said he does not expect Nunez to play any other positions this spring. “For right now,” Girardi said.

• There could still be a role for Nunez at the shortstop position. Girardi said it’s entirely possible that Derek Jeter will regularly DH against lefties this season (an easy way to give him regular rest). That could open a spot for Nunez to play regularly while only playing shortstop.

• Asked whether Nunez and Jayson Nix are the only players legitimately in the mix for a backup infield job, Girardi mentioned three other names. Corban Joseph, David Adams and Dan Johnson. Joseph and Adams are fairly obvious options, but Johnson has primarily been a first baseman and DH. “He’s played some third base,” Girardi said. Girardi compared the potential role to that of Eric Chavez.

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43 Responses to “Know your limits: Hafner, Nunez, Jeter and Johnson”

  1. Nilsson February 17th, 2013 at 1:45 pm

    randy l. February 17th, 2013 at 1:29 pm

    hunsicker was the experienced guy to work for the new guys. this fits my theory that these goldman sachs guys delegate well. they seem to know what they don’t know.

    ——————————————————————————————-

    These Goldman Sachs guys were big contributors to the housing market collapse and world economic meltdown. If only these assclowns delegated so well in real life like they did in baseball :-(

  2. jacksquat February 17th, 2013 at 1:51 pm

    Goldman Sachs did very well, for themselves.

  3. jacksquat February 17th, 2013 at 1:53 pm

    There could still be a role for Nunez at the shortstop position. Girardi said it’s entirely possible that Derek Jeter will regularly DH against lefties this season (an easy way to give him regular rest). That could open a spot for Nunez to play regularly while only playing shortstop.

    Wow, I’ve been saying they should do this all offseason and they may actually do it.

  4. tucker February 17th, 2013 at 1:53 pm

    Interesting comment about Jeter DHing against lefty starters. Assuming Jeter is ready to go at the start of the season, the Yanks need to find a wayntomget him regular rest. This would be one option. And Nunez would likely improve defensively if he had somewhat regular reps at a single position. He performed well when he subbed for an injured Jeter in 2011.

  5. DONNYBROOK February 17th, 2013 at 1:58 pm

    These Jokers should be homeless and pushing a shopping cart down a back alley. The damage they did to so Many is absolutely atrocious.
    So Girardi declares Hafner, “strictly a DH”. Wasting a 2013 roster spot on a strictly 1 Dimensional player, after setting Nunez back by jerking him all over the yard in 2012, is inexplainable.

  6. tucker February 17th, 2013 at 2:07 pm

    I don’t blame them for the Nunez experiment. Short is the toughest position on the field to play defensively. If you can play short, you should be able to play any other position on the field.

    Nunez just doesn’t have a great glove. It was worth a shot to see if he could adapt to the super-sub role. Granted, he should have received some outfield reps before they stuck him out there. It was worth a shot. It failed.

    With regular reps, he can be adequate shortstop. He’ll never be mistaken for Omar Vizquel, but he should deliver at least Bobby Meacham-level defense.

  7. Against All Odds February 17th, 2013 at 2:17 pm

    DONNYBROOK February 17th, 2013 at 1:46 pm
    Price, et al ? Either tell the Entire story, or do Not open the book.

    ———————

    Besides Price and Longoria who else was a high pick.

  8. Tar February 17th, 2013 at 2:20 pm

    Starting at age 23, and in three years Nunez has started a total of 10 games at 2B and 48 games at 3B.

    Maybe you can say he’s had enough of a chance at 3B. But no way was he given a fair shot at 2B.

    Just thinking out loud but I bet if Bowa was still a coach, Nunez would be that super sub we all had hoped for.

  9. randy l. February 17th, 2013 at 2:21 pm

    “While the Devil Rays’ payroll of $35 million puts the team at the bottom of the league, for example, Mr. Friedman uses the mark-to-market method — which allows a Wall Street trader to value a security in his portfolio at the current market price, not the price he paid for it — to gauge his team’s real worth.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04.....wanted=all

    “Applying that notion to baseball allows Mr. Friedman to attach a market value of perhaps $7 million to Scott Kazmir, the team’s star pitcher, who is actually on his payroll for $370,000 a year. Luckily for them, most of the players on the team are contract-bound to salaries lower than what they might command on the open market. The bottom line is this: Mr. Friedman reckons that the real value of the Devil Rays’ payroll is closer to $50 million.”

    so using mark to market accounting, what’s the yankees 2012 payroll really worth?

  10. comnsnse February 17th, 2013 at 2:38 pm

    randy L, were you an accountant for Arthur Anderson when they audited Enron? ;)

  11. Irreverent Discourse February 17th, 2013 at 2:44 pm

    I hate to suggest that you are looking at WAR dollars, but it’s just too funny.

  12. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 17th, 2013 at 2:45 pm

    Here’s a KISS way of looking at the same thing. Since we all know that math is my weak suit, I don’t bother looking at all of the numbers that randy put together to make his case.

    Playing for the New York Yankees in front of 50,000+ rabid and knowledgable fans is much more stressful than playing for the Rays in front of a lukewarm crowd of several thousand. The Rays players can be much looser and since for quite a few years they had the top draft picks, it’s easy to see why they excelled. They don’t have the “win the world series or you’re garbage” mantra read to them day and night. Just like when the Angels won their first WS, saying they just went out and had fun, they weren’t expected to win. When you play for the Yankees, you are “allowed” a very slim margin for error, you’re likely playing much tighter, and the fun aspect that Maddon brings to his team is pretty much nowhere to be found.

    There’s more to it? Fine. Just don’t be so myopic as to totally discount the above.

  13. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 17th, 2013 at 2:50 pm

    jacksquat, Girard has alway been high on Nunez and said in the past he was being groomed for Derek’s job. I think there’s a problem when fans are so tied into their own scenarios that they refuse to acknowledge that there might be different and creative ways that players will be used or that there might be plans afoot of which they have not thought.

  14. randy l. February 17th, 2013 at 3:06 pm

    “randy L, were you an accountant for Arthur Anderson when they audited Enron?”

    no, but i did catch terry gilmore at the white sox spring training facility one whole winter . terry was pissed he was being overlooked by the padres and he did get the win in the triple a all star game that following summer.

    the arthur anderson building was right behind the parking lot there and terry told me his dad was a big wheel in there and if the padres din’t call him up soon he was going to quit baseball and work for arthur anderson. i looked at him like had had said he was going to have a sex change and become a nun.

    that’s my only arthur anderson connection. i think with enron i got some of their electricity when markets were deregulated but i’m not sure. it’s so hard to tell with kilowatts :)

  15. jacksquat February 17th, 2013 at 3:17 pm

    trisha – true pinstriped blue February 17th, 2013 at 2:50 pm
    jacksquat, Girard has alway been high on Nunez and said in the past he was being groomed for Derek’s job. I think there’s a problem when fans are so tied into their own scenarios that they refuse to acknowledge that there might be different and creative ways that players will be used or that there might be plans afoot of which they have not thought.

    There are words and actions. Words aren’t worth much. I tend to not trust what the Yankees say in public because it seems to be designed for public consumption.

    Their actions have not indicated they have much patience with him and are willing to take some lumps to see what they have.

  16. randy l. February 17th, 2013 at 3:20 pm

    “The Rays players can be much looser and since for quite a few years they had the top draft picks, it’s easy to see why they excelled”

    trisha,

    so being loose and getting few number one draft picks explains a 130 million a year discrepancy between the teams ?

    i guess you’re disagreeing with rich in nj data driven theory which i did think was quite good.

    i’m guessing that the data driven smarts that the rays ownership and management possesses has something to do with their success.

    what i’m interested in is that most of the coaching staff is very old school and they seem to mesh nicely with the new school ownership and management.

    your theory is disproved by all the other teams who play under no pressure to win and also have number one draft picks. they don’t win like the rays do.

  17. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 17th, 2013 at 3:31 pm

    The thing is that the Rays had them enough years in a row to make a difference.

    Also, the Nats said hi.

  18. Rich in NJ February 17th, 2013 at 3:40 pm

    “Maybe you can say he’s had enough of a chance at 3B. But no way was he given a fair shot at 2B.”

    He hasn’t been given a fair chance anywhere. He always has to look over his shoulder.

    “Just thinking out loud but I bet if Bowa was still a coach, Nunez would be that super sub we all had hoped for.”

    I don’t know if Bowa would have had that much power, but that should be his role, but it had to start in the mL.

  19. Against All Odds February 17th, 2013 at 3:41 pm

    But outside of Price and Longoria how many of their players were top picks.

  20. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 17th, 2013 at 3:42 pm

    Actually, jacksquat, I believe that Girardi has been extremely high on Nunez. I don’t believe he’s a public consumption guy. I feel bad for Nunez because when your primary position is one that is owned by a top Yankee, you really don’t have much of a chance unless you’re traded off to another team. That the guy doesn’t get enough playing time in the majors is certainly not his fault. He’s paraded to different positions of necessity. And when he makes errors in the field, the Yankees are between a rock and a hard place because fans don’t like errors…

    I do believe they expect that he will someday be a regular for the Yankees.

    *************

    randy – I tend to look over your posts, not so much rich in nj’s. There are only so many hours in a day and I don’t seem to have the luxury others do who are here much more often. So I have to pick and choose who I will read and who I will not.

  21. Rich in NJ February 17th, 2013 at 3:42 pm

    “But outside of Price and Longoria how many of their players were top picks.”

    That’s just a diversion. It’s inarguable that they are run superbly given their payroll.

  22. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 17th, 2013 at 3:43 pm

    “so being loose and getting few number one draft picks explains a 130 million a year discrepancy between the teams ?”

    Read my post again. I didn’t say it totally explains it. I just said don’t discount it.

  23. Irreverent Discourse February 17th, 2013 at 3:56 pm

    AAO – It has a lot more to do with not trading prospects for multiple years than where their prospects were drafted, because they don’t care about trying to guarantee a postseason birth on paper every season through FA acquisition.

  24. randy l. February 17th, 2013 at 3:59 pm

    “Also, the Nats said hi.”

    trisha-

    “Theodore N. “Ted” Lerner (born October 15, 1925 in Washington, DC) is an American real estate developer and managing principal owner of the Washington Nationals baseball team. As of September 2012, Ted Lerner is number 100 on the Forbes 400 list, and number 344 on Forbes “The World’s Billionaires List” with an estimated net worth of US$3.9 Billion”
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Lerner

    i think the jason werth 126 million dollar contract shows something a little different going on with the nationals than the rays.

    the owner is 80 of the nats. the nationals salaries are going to go way up with their free agent signings. no doubt getting a strasburg and a harper help by having the high draft picks but i don’t see a lot of similarity in how the nationals and the rays do things.

    if the nats can keep their team salaries down and still be up near the top then they’d be like the rays.
    i don’t see them being a similar type organization.

  25. Irreverent Discourse February 17th, 2013 at 3:59 pm

    Who’s doing it best right now?

    On Fangraphs, WAR Dollars are WAR adjusted to a monetary scale. It is supposed to show what a players production would cost a team on the FA market.

    Because I love you guys… I went to Fangraphs and did this… Batting $ + Pitching $ – Final Payroll in excel…

    Values are in millions of dollars…

    Team Pitching Batting WAR $ Totals Final Payroll Excess Value?
    Diamondbacks $94.30 $119.70 $214.00 $77.16 $136.84
    Rays $104.60 $100.40 $205.00 $70.43 $134.57
    Athletics $81.30 $106.80 $188.10 $59.49 $128.61
    Nationals $96.20 $129.00 $225.20 $96.70 $128.50
    Brewers $75.00 $151.20 $226.20 $99.93 $126.27
    Reds $94.50 $116.40 $210.90 $88.11 $122.79
    Cardinals $84.80 $150.10 $234.90 $115.45 $119.45
    Braves $83.20 $130.70 $213.90 $97.25 $116.65
    Rangers $107.70 $119.40 $227.10 $134.28 $92.82
    Pirates $54.90 $92.10 $147.00 $61.30 $85.70
    Padres $25.80 $115.10 $140.90 $62.88 $78.02
    Royals $67.50 $77.70 $145.20 $68.61 $76.59
    Tigers $111.60 $94.80 $206.40 $140.70 $65.70
    White Sox $81.70 $85.00 $166.70 $101.76 $64.94
    Giants $66.10 $134.40 $200.50 $138.15 $62.35
    Orioles $74.70 $68.70 $143.40 $89.06 $54.34
    Angels $44.90 $168.20 $213.10 $160.15 $52.95
    Rockies $54.50 $80.40 $134.90 $84.19 $50.71
    Marlins $71.00 $66.50 $137.50 $89.88 $47.62
    Mets $56.10 $87.10 $143.20 $103.71 $39.49
    Dodgers $75.60 $91.20 $166.80 $129.08 $37.72
    Mariners $60.60 $60.50 $121.10 $84.45 $36.65
    Twins $25.00 $101.00 $126.00 $101.17 $24.83
    Phillies $86.80 $105.20 $192.00 $169.73 $22.27
    Indians $35.00 $53.40 $88.40 $69.17 $19.23
    Astros $36.20 $43.10 $79.30 $63.94 $15.36
    Blue Jays $34.20 $70.90 $105.10 $92.13 $12.97
    Yankees $91.20 $138.80 $230.00 $223.30 $6.70
    Cubs $34.70 $60.90 $95.60 $107.71 ($12.11)
    Red Sox $61.70 $93.40 $155.10 $168.61 ($13.51)

    I would put it in a spreadsheet for you guys, but I don’t trust the trolls.

    The discussion that really needs to take place is… would you prefer the consistent trips to the post-season that the Yankees have been making, or would you prefer the streaky last-to-first-to-last craziness that you get from being a fan of the teams at the top of this list.

    The Cardinals seem to be the best mix of consistancy, payroll value over the last half decade.

  26. comnsnse February 17th, 2013 at 4:04 pm

    At the risk of digressing from the spring training non news.

    Check out the Sec.’s Of the Treasury and other financial advisors to our government leadership (oxymoron) for the last 35 years and all will be revealed as to the correct interpretation of the “Golden Rule”!

  27. comnsnse February 17th, 2013 at 4:07 pm

    Irreverent Discourse, were you at A.Anderson too?

    Also doesn’t everyone want to win or be competitive every year?

    Anyone can spend money, spending it wisely is more difficult,no?

  28. randy l. February 17th, 2013 at 4:07 pm

    “randy – I tend to look over your posts, not so much rich in nj’s. There are only so many hours in a day and I don’t seem to have the luxury others do who are here much more often. So I have to pick and choose who I will read and who I will not.”

    trisha that’s ok, but i read your posts when i see them, and i think of you often. i do know you’re busy :

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3btVEGC00Ns

    :)

  29. Irreverent Discourse February 17th, 2013 at 4:09 pm

    “Also doesn’t everyone want to win or be competitive every year?”

    Debatable. The Marlins say hello.

    I would say a lot of teams want to be just competitive enough to make sure they don’t break the ML loss record. Outside of that it’s hard to say that more than half the teams int he league can reasonably expect to make the playoffs at the start of each season.

    Teams like the 2012 Orioles are just complete flukes, compilations of an excessive amount of luck.

  30. Rich in NJ February 17th, 2013 at 4:11 pm

    “because they don’t care about trying to guarantee a postseason birth on paper every season through FA acquisition.”

    It is the most counterproductive thing the Yankees do, and if they keep it up while shrinking payroll, it won’t be long before they aren’t fooling anyone (or almost anyone; some people will believe anything they say).

  31. randy l. February 17th, 2013 at 4:13 pm

    “Teams like the 2012 Orioles are just complete flukes”

    i don’t think the 2012 orioles were just luck.

    we’ll see in 2013 though if they were. they did make some radical management and coaching moves in adding duquette and rick peterson.

  32. Irreverent Discourse February 17th, 2013 at 4:15 pm

    Rich – I wouldn’t exactly call it counter-productive… they still get positive value from their large payroll almost every season. It has to actually fail first before you can say the “shrinking payroll” will make a difference.

    You could just as easily say that the teams that don’t spend the money aren’t fooling anyone… and if they don’t increase their payroll to keep their star prospects in house, they will never be able to compete for more than a few years at a time.

  33. Irreverent Discourse February 17th, 2013 at 4:17 pm

    randy l – The Orioles were 21st in the league in Total WAR$. Their crazy streak of winning 1-run games with a ground ball closer is basically what put them in the postseason (along with the largely unforeseen but complete collapses of the angels/red sox).

  34. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 17th, 2013 at 4:24 pm

    randy, that wasn’t very nice. I still have hope for you. Maybe that’s my optimism out of control?

  35. Irreverent Discourse February 17th, 2013 at 4:25 pm

    Of course by WAR $… the Giants shouldn’t have even made the playoffs.

    NL Central Cardinals
    AL East Yankees
    AL West Rangers
    NL WC1 Brewers
    NL East Nationals
    NL West Diamondbacks
    NL WC2 Braves
    AL WC1 Angels
    out Reds
    AL Central Tigers
    AL WC2 Rays
    out Giants
    The Orioles are another 8 teams down the list.

    I guess that’s what they play the games. /cliche

    And also why things like WAR are merely tools, not reasons. :)

  36. randy l. February 17th, 2013 at 4:27 pm

    “The Orioles were 21st in the league in Total WAR$. ”

    i’m well aware of how the orioles also won so many games with a run differential that says they should have been about 2 games over .500.

    maybe there is something different going on there that isn’t measured by pyth won loss.

  37. randy l. February 17th, 2013 at 4:29 pm

    “randy, that wasn’t very nice. I still have hope for you. ”

    oops sorry, i didn’t think you read my posts :)

  38. Irreverent Discourse February 17th, 2013 at 4:29 pm

    “maybe there is something different going on there that isn’t measured by pyth won loss.”

    Yeah, luck. :)

    Sometimes the ball just bounces your way.

    In Jim Johnson’s case, it did quite often. :)

  39. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 17th, 2013 at 4:30 pm

    I think I just told you that I did.

    “randy – I tend to look over your posts, not so much rich in nj’s”

    I said look over, meaning read, not overlook.

  40. Irreverent Discourse February 17th, 2013 at 4:30 pm

    Luck and the random distribution of events makes anything possible, just not any more probable.

  41. randy l. February 17th, 2013 at 4:36 pm

    “randy – I tend to look over your posts, not so much rich in nj’s”

    “I said look over, meaning read, not overlook.”

    oh, now i get it. i though you were insulting me :)

    sorry about that. whoopsie :)

    but rich in nj has some good stuff. why wouldn’t you read his posts ?

  42. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 17th, 2013 at 4:39 pm

    Because he hasn’t been around for a long time and my time on the forum is usually limited, so I have gotten into a rhythm in terms of posters I tend to read.

  43. jmills February 27th, 2013 at 5:01 pm

    I have hope for myself! Did the Jays do it, who won the race? :D

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