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Sunday morning notes: Jeter says he’s on Rivera’s schedule

Posted by: Chad Jennings - Posted in Misc on Feb 17, 2013 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

As position players wandered in and out of the Yankees clubhouse this morning, Derek Jeter found out that Kevin Youkilis had already landed himself on the tabloid back pages with his “always a Red Sock” comment.

“Pettitte just told me,” Jeter said. “He told me to say something controversial in this press conference so I can get (Youkilis) off the back pages. I’ll let him have it. Welcome to New York.”

As you might expect, Jeter didn’t say anything controversial this morning. He didn’t comment on his contract or Alex Rodriguez’s situation, and he said his only focus has been getting ready for Opening Day. He doesn’t expect to play in the early spring training games, but Jeter said there’s still plenty of time to get ready. So far, he has only run on a treadmill, but he’s expecting to run on the field tomorrow.

“I’m on Mo’s schedule,” Jeter said. “Five innings and I’ll be ready to go.”

But seriously.

“I’m not concerned with re-injuring the ankle,” he said. “… I know I won’t be playing when they start playing in a week. You can write that down. I’m not playing in that game. I don’t think you necessarily need all of spring training to get ready. There have been years when I’ve played inn the WBC and missed the majority of spring training and was still able to get ready. I don’t know exactly the date that I’m going to play, but it will probably be somewhere there after a couple weeks.”

At this point it’s all about doing the regular work on the field, and that process will resume tomorrow. For now, it’s one more day with only the pitchers and catchers working out. First full-squad workout is tomorrow.

• Travis Hafner said he literally does not go through any sort of defensive drills anymore. He technically owns a first baseman’s glove, but it sits in his locker unused. “I haven’t really thrown much over the last five years or so,” he said. “It’d be something that, I don’t know, maybe just try it out and see how it goes, but I’m not sure at this point.”

• David Adams is in big league camp. He said his back was a little sore this winter and the Yankees gave him an epidural last week. He’s roughly a week behind schedule but should be able to fully participate soon. The back hasn’t bothered him in a few days. “I feel pretty good,” he said.

• Among the highlights on arrival day: Ichiro Suzuki showing up wearing a cap with the letters NY — not the Yankees logo — in blue glitter. Photos aren’t allowed in the clubhouse, so I couldn’t take a picture. Just trust me, it was perfectly amazing and uniquely Ichiro.

• Random observation: Luke Murton is a huge dude. Looks like the kind of guy who hit 25 homers last year. We might get a chance to see quite a bit of him with Mark Teixeira going to play in the WBC.

• Asked Ronnier Mustelier how to pronounce his first name. It’s basically the way it looks — Ron-ee-ear — except he rolls the R at the beginning. So start doing that when you say his name, just because it’s kind of fun.

• Greg Bird. Nice guy. Had a random conversation only because of his locker placement at the end of a row. Feel free to make him a favorite. He just has the look of a guy who should hit. He said he played quite a bit of first base when he was younger, so the transition away from catcher has been fairly easy.

• A lot of guys throwing batting practice today.

Field 1
Facing Slade Heathcott, Luke Murton and Cito Culver
Ivan Nova (to Chris Stewart)
Joba Chamberlain (Stewart)
Matt Daley (Austin Romine)
Mark Montgomery (Romine)
Francisco Rondon (J.R. Murphy)
Jose Ramirez (Murphy)
Mike O’Brien (Francisco Arcia)
Corey Black (Arcia)

Field 2
Facing Greg Bird, Kyle Roller, Tyler Austin and Ronnier Mustelier
Cody Eppley (Francisco Cervelli)
Bryan Mitchell (Cervelli)
Chase Whitley (Bobby Wilson)
Preston Claiborne (Wilson)
Josh Spence (Gary Sanchez)
Branden Pinder (Sanchez)
Shane Green (Kyle Higashioka)
Kelvin Perez (Higashioka)

• Catchers batting practice groups (these changed around a little bit to match up with the BP sessions)

Group 1
Arcia, Stewart, Romine, Murphy

Group 2
Cervelli, Higashioka, Sanchez, Wilson

Cell phone photo

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39 Responses to “Sunday morning notes: Jeter says he’s on Rivera’s schedule”

  1. jacksquat February 17th, 2013 at 11:26 am

    Chip February 17th, 2013 at 8:44 am
    Jack…

    I might be wrong, but I think Robertson is up for arbitration not free agency after 2014.

    According to every reference, he is a free agent after 2014.

  2. jacksquat February 17th, 2013 at 11:27 am

    Randy, I thought you were going to stop talking to us dumbos?

    Please spare us your math that makes politicians look honest.

  3. trisha - true pinstriped blue February 17th, 2013 at 11:29 am

    Travis Haffner might not end up being a bad acquisition at all. One thing he can do is hit the long ball, something I’ve read is missing from the Yankee arsenal…

    :)

  4. J. Alfred Prufrock February 17th, 2013 at 11:33 am

    Way to build Nova’s confidence, having him pitch to Stewie :)

  5. Tar February 17th, 2013 at 11:35 am

    He technically owns a first baseman’s glove, but it sits in his locker unused. “I haven’t really thrown much over the last five years or so,”

    Have to admit I really don’t get this. How could you be a ball player and not want to play catch? Does he just sit there and watch everybody else? You can only hit so much, It would be incredibly boring to just sit on the bench and watch every day.

    If it was me I would be more like Mo, running around chasing fly balls or whatever.

  6. Ys Guy February 17th, 2013 at 11:35 am

    there’s a ton of really exciting things about this year’s team besides hughes.

    mo’s last year isn’t interesting?( how about pettitte’s?)

    developing a new catcher isn’t interesting?

    cano in a walk-year with a legitimate shot at an mvp isnt exciting enough?

  7. Against All Odds February 17th, 2013 at 11:37 am

    and for the Yankees’ 6th inning

    ———————————

    Need to lock down that tough and painful 6th inning. He’s the most important picther on the team in the 6th

  8. Against All Odds February 17th, 2013 at 11:38 am

    yankeefeminista February 17th, 2013 at 11:12 am
    Odds, you mean because Joba is a… stahtin’ pitchah?!!!

    ———————–

    That never gets old :D

  9. Tar February 17th, 2013 at 11:42 am

    Interesting the worst inning by far for Yankee pitchers is the 1st inning, followed by the 5th.

    Mo should start!!! :D

    http://www.baseball-reference......;year=2012

  10. Stoneburner - The Return of Wax February 17th, 2013 at 11:43 am

    Greg Bird. Nice guy. Had a random conversation only because of his locker placement at the end of a row. Feel free to make him a favorite. He just has the look of a guy who should hit. He said he played quite a bit of first base when he was younger, so the transition away from catcher has been fairly easy.

    *****

    Thanks for this, Chad. Bird, Corey Black, and Ramon Flores have been routinely neglected by the prospect snobs/elitists around here (see below for reference), so it is nice to hear about Bird – - – - -

    J. Alfred Prufrock January 14th, 2013 at 9:12 pm

    I only “hug” the really good ones . More prospect snob, than hugger.

    This is Stoneburner, reporting from Ceti Alpha V, with the wax poetic minute – - – -

  11. yankeefeminista February 17th, 2013 at 11:50 am

    Thanks for the info, Chad. I too am excited to see Bird hit live.

    Odds. It. Never. Gets. Old. I laughed out loud when I saw your post. :mrgreen:

  12. Tar February 17th, 2013 at 11:50 am

    ignore ignorant ignoramuses.

    I like it :D

  13. yankeefeminista February 17th, 2013 at 11:53 am

    I think Robertson is Arb3 in 2014, FA in 2015.

  14. Tar February 17th, 2013 at 11:57 am

    “I think Robertson is Arb3 in 2014, FA in 2015.”

    Hate to say it but….If they fall out of contention, I think he will be one of the first one’s dealt.

  15. UnKnown February 17th, 2013 at 11:57 am

    Jeter is the best. Love that guy.

  16. FiretheUMPIRE February 17th, 2013 at 11:58 am

    I never realized how bad Jeter’s fracture was. ESPN’s article says it has screws in it and a plate.

    Eduardo Nunez could end up with more playing time than expected.

  17. yankeefeminista February 17th, 2013 at 11:59 am

    Robertson has been pretty consistent for a RP, unlike your typical generally fungible RP. I would not like us to lose him, but realize he will be costly soon.

  18. Duh Innings II February 17th, 2013 at 12:09 pm

    Will Jeter ever grow in his hair and ace the sideburns? LOL.

    How funny would it be if Jeter showed up to spring training camp one day with hair as long as Johnny Damon when he was with Boston, hit .600 in spring training then .450 in April, and the Yanks made an exception to their “no long hair” appearance code with Jeter for fear that Jeter would lose his hitting prowess?

  19. Tar February 17th, 2013 at 12:11 pm

    “I would not like us to lose him, but realize he will be costly soon.”

    Me neither, I like him a lot. But not only will he be costly, but he could probably bring back a kings ransom. Dangerous combination heading into uncharted waters.

  20. joeman February 17th, 2013 at 12:21 pm

    FiretheUMPIRE February 17th, 2013 at 11:58 am
    I never realized how bad Jeter’s fracture was. ESPN’s article says it has screws in it and a plate.

    Eduardo Nunez could end up with more playing time than expected.

    ———————————
    been saying this whole off-season here that this was a huge injury Jeter had, tough to come back from at 100%..we’ll see if he ready for reg season start…I say I doubt it

  21. randy l. February 17th, 2013 at 12:24 pm

    “Please spare us your math that makes politicians look honest.”

    jacksquat-

    let’s just say that some of us have more intellectual curiosity than others.

    it’s interesting to me how some wall street guys from goldman sachs can go into major league baseball with ZERO baseball management experience and be within 3 games of the yankees in wins on average the last three years , and do this while spending 130 million less each year in salaries.

    i don’t love investment banker types, but are these guys really that much smarter than the guys the yankees have in the ownership, president, and gm position because they really are kicking their ass as far as bang for their buck.

    the rays gm was 28 i think when he went into the gm position with no pro baseball experience at all.
    seriously how do these guys do it?

    i don’t really think the yankees can compete on an austerity budget if cashman isn’t as good as friedman.

    is there anyone here who thinks he is?

  22. DONNYBROOK February 17th, 2013 at 12:26 pm

    So Hafner NO longer takes fielding practice and has NOT thrown much for 5 yrs? This is Exactly the kind of SLUGGO the Yankees have NO need for. Strictly 1 Dimensional and Non-athletic. Basically, the baseball equivalent of an Ice Hockey Goon.

  23. Against All Odds February 17th, 2013 at 12:28 pm

    yankeefeminista February 17th, 2013 at 11:50 am
    Thanks for the info, Chad. I too am excited to see Bird hit live.

    Odds. It. Never. Gets. Old. I laughed out loud when I saw your post.

    ———————-

    *bows* Thank you

  24. RMS February 17th, 2013 at 12:29 pm

    randy l.

    When are you starting your job in Yankee Management?

  25. Rich in NJ February 17th, 2013 at 12:44 pm

    As I mentioned last night, Robertson could be one of their best trade chips, and unlike some of their others, they may have more quality depth there.

  26. randy l. February 17th, 2013 at 12:45 pm

    “there’s a ton of really exciting things about this year’s team besides hughes.

    mo’s last year isn’t interesting?( how about pettitte’s?)

    developing a new catcher isn’t interesting?

    cano in a walk-year with a legitimate shot at an mvp isnt exciting enough?”

    ys guy-

    watching the titantic hit the iceberg was pretty exciting too i’ll bet
    lots of heroic acts of courage i’m sure were very interesting to watch :)

  27. Rich in NJ February 17th, 2013 at 12:47 pm

    “it’s interesting to me how some wall street guys from goldman sachs can go into major league baseball with ZERO baseball management experience and be within 3 games of the yankees in wins on average the last three years , and do this while spending 130 million less each year in salaries.”

    This is about hiring really smart guys who are purely data-driven.

    Plus, they aren’t afraid to take a step back by losing.

    That is what hurts the Yankees more than anything. They are too willing to overpay to remain afloat.

  28. tucker February 17th, 2013 at 1:19 pm

    If the number of comments are any type of indicator, then I would say fan interest in the team is down sharply from prior spring trainings.

    Granted, there is not much news so far, but I think the general anticipation of this year is not what it was in 09 or 2010. Don’t be surprised to see a corresponding ratings and attendance dip. I can only imagine what it will be like next year if the team sticks to 189 or bust. We may see bust.

  29. Stoneburner - The Return of Wax February 17th, 2013 at 1:20 pm

    it’s interesting to me how some wall street guys from goldman sachs can go into major league baseball with ZERO baseball management experience and be within 3 games of the yankees in wins on average the last three years , and do this while spending 130 million less each year in salaries

    *****

    Naaah – they had help – it was not ZERO experience:

    Hunsicker previously served as the Tampa Bay Ray’s Senior Vice President, Baseball Operations, a position he held since November 2005. Hunsicker was part of principal owner Stuart Sternberg’s new management group and was a key figure in reshaping their baseball operations into the successful department it is today. With the Rays, Hunsicker was instrumental in helping to create significant presence in Venezuela, the Dominican Republic, Colombia and Brazil. In 2009, he also oversaw the Rays expanded efforts in Asia and Europe.

    The rest of the resume is impressive as well, but I especially like the fact that he was the Senior Vice President of Baseball Operations for the Rays, basically brought on to help out Andrew Friedman.

    http://www.chadmoriyama.com/20.....perations/

  30. randy l. February 17th, 2013 at 1:21 pm

    rich in nj-

    i’m really curious about how the rays have done what they are doing.

    some quick googling really shows sternberg the owner, silverman the president, and friedman the gm as total outsiders to major league baseball.

    outsiders should not be able to come into an industry that’s been around over a hundred years and in 2-3 years compete with the best team in the history of the game.

    these guys are goldman sachs guys. my feel on goldman sachs is that they are dishonest in the sense that they stack the table in their favor. and that they are really smart. besides just using statistical analysis from the investment world, perhaps sternberg is clever on creating rules that stack the deck in his favor too, and then being smart enough to know how to bend those rules.

    if it’s just as simple as guys who are purely data driven i’m not sure that the rays ownership and management would have gotten the results it has. they really have done an amazing job.

    it’s possible to be data driven and then have little respect for the coaches and players in the game. i spent a day in rays minor league camp a few years ago when price was a rookie. the rays have a lot of really dedicated hard working blue collar type coaches who seem to be really all on the same page.
    i don’t get the feeling that this is a team run by a bunch of nerds.

    i know nothing about what goldman sachs really does. maybe there is some really good judgement in knowing how to delegate to go along with number crunching ability, but there is something going on there i don’t see with the yankees.

    there really is an intelligence mixed with old school baseball going on.
    i don’t think it’s just being data driven. i think it’s also the goldman sachs guys know that they don’t know baseball the way maddon does or even dick bosman the minor league pitching coordinator say does.

    there seems to be an intelligence and communication on issues like what to do with shields as he approached his last expensive two years with the team. i get the feeling that flipping shields for wil myers the best minor league player in 2012 was an agreement between the data driven ownership and management and the old school coaches and manager.

    i guess i’m saying i don’t thing there is a moneyball situation going on where the manager and coaches are fighting the data driven ownership and management. there is no old school/ new school fight going on.

    i’m not sure what’s going on actually, but the rays really seem to be doing some really good things the yankees aren’t.

  31. randy l. February 17th, 2013 at 1:29 pm

    “Naaah – they had help – it was not ZERO experience:”

    the three top guys had ZERO MLB baseball experience.

    hunsicker was the experienced guy to work for the new guys. this fits my theory that these goldman sachs guys delegate well. they seem to know what they don’t know.

  32. DONNYBROOK February 17th, 2013 at 1:37 pm

    Just how wrong can you go with the draft picks TB had? Gimme a break. These guys ain’t figuring things out with Only spread sheets and a calculator.

  33. Rich in NJ February 17th, 2013 at 1:38 pm

    randy

    GS really gets their questionable rep from being on both sides of a bet. They would say that these moves are justified because they are done in separate, walled-off departments of the firm, but those conflicts need to be disclosed to any prospective client, and even if that is done, it still leaves a huge appearance of impropriety issue.

    That aside, they have some of the best people making objective forecasts. They don’t let politics cloud their econ/financial judgment.

    I don’t know the specifics about how Friedman and his group make decisions, but I think you are probably overlooking something. Coaches, managers, and scouts (iow, baseball people), are sources of data. The key is to use their inputs just as you would statistical metrics, and finding a way to assign some weighted value to their reports.

    Also, Maddon is good at using data; so is Girardi to a degree, but Girardi seems too willing to let his biases affect his judgment. For example, he may prefer a defensive catcher, but if you only have one that can’t hit water in a boat, you are going to get more value from a hack who can rake. I don’t know enough about Maddon to know if he has similar biases.

    The bottom line is that, as you point out, TB gets a tremendous amount of value added from their resources.

    If Hal cares about achieving cost-efficiency, it is a model he should copy, administered by people who have demonstrated an ability to implement it.

  34. Stoneburner - The Return of Wax February 17th, 2013 at 1:40 pm

    “Naaah – they had help – it was not ZERO experience:”

    the three top guys had ZERO MLB baseball experience.

    hunsicker was the experienced guy to work for the new guys. this fits my theory that these goldman sachs guys delegate well. they seem to know what they don’t know.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dq8smKtru6w

    BTW – for the most part – every owner delegates – unless you are Stienbrenner or Jerry Jones types – - – -

    BTW BTW – Friedman was in another position before assuming the GM position

    From 2004 to 2005, Friedman served as the Director of Baseball Development for the Rays.
    Friedman was promoted to his current position after the 2005 season, at the age of 28, replacing the club’s first General Manager, Chuck LaMar, who was fired following the club’s 8th losing season in its 8 years in existence.

    BTW BTW – from 2004-2007 – the Rays were awful – just terrible – - – -

    BTW BTW BTW – Friedman whiffed terribly on Buster Posey – - – -

    It was not until 2006 season did these goldman sachs guys finally realize – hey maybe we should “delegate” to Hunsicker – - – -please – - – - -

  35. Rich in NJ February 17th, 2013 at 1:42 pm

    “Just how wrong can you go with the draft picks TB had? Gimme a break. These guys ain’t figuring things out with Only spread sheets and a calculator.”

    I posted this before, but before I go:

    Shields: 16th round
    Moore: 8th round
    Hellickson: 4th round
    Jennings: 10th round
    Davis: 3rrd round

    So you’re wrong.

  36. DONNYBROOK February 17th, 2013 at 1:46 pm

    Price, et al ? Either tell the Entire story, or do Not open the book.

  37. randy l. February 17th, 2013 at 2:00 pm

    “Coaches, managers, and scouts (iow, baseball people), are sources of data.”

    rich in nj-

    thanks for the quick overview on why goldman sachs has such a bad rep. like i said i know i don’t like them, but don’t really know why :)

    ok so how are baseball people, coaches etc sources of data. lets take the shields situation because i have some inside knowledge there. how does the data driven managemnt get data from the coaches coaching shields and coaching archer the guy that the rays decided to replace shields with.

    clearly the data driven guys don’t give advice on how to make archer better. or do they?

    i can see that the data driven guys could weigh shields against archer/ wil myers plus having shields salary to use elsewhere, but i don’t see how the data driven guys make the guy who coaches archer better at coaching.

    i do see how maybe they could see that the particular coach does make guys like archer better. maybe the rays are measuring the results of it’s coaches in a stat way like they with players.

    my take is more that the rays baseball operations on the field is very sharp and crisp. the nerds do seem to let some really professional coaches do their thing.

    but maybe what you’re saying is that maybe the data driven guys are somehow getting the old school coaches to put what’s happening with archer into data these guys can understand. that would make sense because if the shields trade depended on archer coming and being ready to start in 2012 , they’d have to be measuring that.

    i guess the question is how do the rays connect their data driven philosophy with old school coaches.
    there must be a whole lot going on there that’s behind the scenes.

  38. randy l. February 17th, 2013 at 2:08 pm

    BTW, the rays for the last three years spent about 390 million less than the yankees and only finished 9 games back.

    surely you have some intellectual curiosity how they did this.

    if not, well, continue being the blog jester/ fool :)

    and i’ll be the first to say it’s good to poke fun at those in power.

    but the yankees are the ones in power.

    maybe you should set your sights on them.

  39. rl1856 February 17th, 2013 at 6:49 pm

    Investments and baseball are more similar than you think. Both rely on reams of data but also require an intelligent human to convert the data into an actionable decision. The real strength of GS is in talent evaluation. They have consistently attracted, and retained the best, most incisive and most intelligent people around. They are a meritocracy in the sense that they provide the tools for the most capable to rise up through the ranks. What have they done with the D’Rays ? They have applied the GS model to baseball. They have attracted very capable coaches, scouts and development people. They have made astute evaluations of talent and future projections of performance. The investment if you will is baseball players instead of stocks and bonds. As for the rest of what they do…they don’t care which side of an investment they are on, as long as it is the profitable side. The have knowingly positioned themselves to profit from the decline of investments that they knew would fail. If you are familiar with Plato, recall that to fully know a subject is to know all sides, the good and bad. Taken to an extreme, the best teacher is also the best corrupter.

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