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A New York Yankees blog by Chad Jennings and the staff of The Journal News


Postgame notes: “Encouraging”

Posted by: Chad Jennings - Posted in Misc on Jul 04, 2013 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

Ichiro Suzuki

Granted, the Yankees always beat up on the Twins. And yes, they’re 11-3 all-time at Target Field. And it’s true, the Twins are not very good this season. But think back to Monday when the Yankees had lost five in a row, giving themselves a legitimate chance of falling below .500 and into last place in the division before getting back to Yankee Stadium.

Four days ago, the Yankees did not look like a team capable of beating the Twins. Now the Yankees have won four straight and are heading home with some momentum heading into the final 10 games before the All-Star break.

“Wins are wins,” Travis Hafner said. “Every night you’re playing somebody good in baseball. I think we can take a lot away from this series, getting the wins and swinging the bats well.”

Here’s the part that seemed most infuriating about the Orioles series: The Yankees had scoring opportunities in those games, and only one of them got truly out of reach. The Yankees were left shaking their heads, trying to answer for an offense that seemed incapable of taking advantage or battling back.

Then they came from behind on Monday night, taking the lead with a three-run eighth and burying the Twins with a four-run ninth. They scored in big bunches again on Tuesday, then came from behind again on Wednesday. Today they grabbed an early lead with a three-run first, then put the game away with a four-run sixth. And this time they did it with no significant help from hitless Robinson Cano.

“There’s a lot of momentum that’s involved when it comes to a lineup,” Vernon Wells said. “You get guys getting some key hits, and it’s different guys throughout the lineup. Obviously Robbie had a great series for us, but today we allowed him to take a day off and not have to carry us. That’s the important thing, just to have different guys doing it. If we’re able to do that like we did in April, we’ll win our share of games.”

Does a four-game sweep in Minnesota mean the offense woes are over? Of course not. But it’s obviously a good sign, and a good opportunity heading back to Yankee Stadium for a rematch against the Orioles. The Yankees looked completely lost four days ago, but this week they did exactly what a good team should do against a struggling team like the Twins.

“Baltimore was frustrating because we really had a chance to win a couple of games there and we weren’t able to do it,” Joe Girardi said. “We hadn’t won a series in a while so I think it was pretty important. … After some disappointing games in Baltimore, we win all kinds of different games here. It’s encouraging. We swung the bats well here and that’s encouraging.”

Travis Hafner, Zoilo Almonte• If you haven’t already, check out Bob Nightengale’s story on Alex Rodriguez’s rehab. “I know people think I’m nuts,” Rodriguez told USA Today. “I know most people wouldn’t want the confrontation. Most people would say, ‘Get me out of here. Trade me. Do anything.’ But I’m the (expletive) crazy man who goes, ‘I want to compete. I want to stay in New York. I refuse to quit.’ Maybe it’s stupidity, I don’t know, but I’m wired to compete and give my best. I have a responsibility to be ready to play as soon as I can.”

• Cano snapped his streak of six straight games with multiple hits — he went 0-for-4 with a sac fly — but Wells has now had multiple hits in his past two starts. That’s a bit of a step forward for a guy who was completely lost not so long ago. He had three RBI in the first three innings today. “I think the swings are better,” Wells said. “The things that K-Long and I are working on, we’ll keep working on them, keep taking several swings until it’s as comfortable as it can be. The biggest thing is, you get results, you’re happy. You want to make sure you continue doing what you’re working on. He’s critiquing each and every swing and so far it comes back with a thumbs-up.”

• Speaking of slumping guys who are hitting better, Hafner went 3-for-4, his first three hit game since April 30. “Probably my last six or seven at-bats is probably about as good as I’ve felt in a long time,” Hafner said. “So at this point, it’s just about consistency, and hopefully keep that going and keep swinging it well.”

• Ichiro Suzuki was a home run short of the cycle. Was he planning to go for it that last at-bat? “Look at my arms,” Ichiro said. “I don’t think I had a chance. Maybe an inside-the-park home run.”

• Another multi-hit game for rookie Zoilo Almonte who went 6-for-18 during this four-game series. He’s locking himself in as an everyday player at this point. He’s reached base in six of his past seven games.

David Phelps• David Phelps was far, far, far from excited after the game. That is to say, he was happy — “It’s a big league win, no matter how you look at it,” he said — but he was clearly disappointed by that seventh inning, which really forced a good start to end on a sour note. “It was frustrating,” Phelps said. “Go out for the seventh and give up three hits. Got to do better than that.”

• Through the first six innings, Phelps did do better than that. His only run allowed in those innings was the first of two Justin Morneau home runs. It was a significant improvement after his previous start in Baltimore.

• One specific thing that bothered Phelps is the same pitch that bothered him against the Orioles. “My curveball’s still got to be sharper,” he said. “The home run was on a curveball. I gave up an 0-2 pitch to, I think it was Hicks, on a curveball. Got to get back to trusting it and bouncing it when I need to.”

• Bottom line for Phelps, he was given an early lead, and he never gave it up. The Yankees scored three runs in the first, and Phelps didn’t allow a run until the fourth. “That’s when you really want to put up a zero,” he said. “You want to get us back and hitting as soon as possible. You’ve got a chance to really put your foot on their throat right there early. We did a good job of that today.”

• Final word goes to Wells. “I think our offense as group, we were glad to see June go away and July start. The important thing is scoring runs and adding runs on, taking advantage of mistakes. We’re getting pitches up in the zone and we’re not missing them. This is obviously a good thing heading back home, where we can obviously do some damage in our park.”

Associated Press photos

 
 

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88 Responses to “Postgame notes: “Encouraging””

  1. mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:10 pm

    Still looking smart. Let’s keep your prophecy going. If the Yankees were to run the table you would be authorized to remind us daily for a very long time.
    ===============
    Mac-Not to worry, not built that way. Just want what’s best for the team..

  2. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 8:10 pm

    chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 8:00 pm
    Pat M/Hans-

    When I think about the boss, I almost always think about him stepping in to “fix” the Yankees after they lost to the Dodgers in 81… if I remember correctly, it resulted in the Dave Collins/Steve Kemp Yanks… what a train wreck

    I remember the Yankees when they were run by hands off businessmen like Topping and Webb and a genius of a GM in Weiss. Gabe Paul was from the same school as Weiss and George couldn’t stand any applause directed at a subordinate.

  3. mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:14 pm

    Wasn’t that the team that would be built around speed?

  4. mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:16 pm

    • Another multi-hit game for rookie Zoilo Almonte who went 6-for-18 during this four-game series. He’s locking himself in as an everyday player at this point. He’s reached base in six of his past seven games.
    =================
    Again, I ask, what happens to Zoilo when Grandy gets back?
    Doubt they keep running him out there every day…

  5. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 8:20 pm

    mick says:

    July 4, 2013 at 8:14 pmWasn’t that the team that would be built around speed?
    —-
    Yep. George was infatuated with Collins (turns out Kemp came the next year in 83).

    As for Zolio,, it will be interesting… he almost has to become a bit player.

  6. comet July 4th, 2013 at 8:21 pm

    Mick if he is hitting over .300 it will be hard to sit him.

    Ideally they would deal Granderson when he was ready to come back but who would take him without seeing if he still has the power.

  7. Hankflorida July 4th, 2013 at 8:22 pm

    I go back to the Yankee team of the 1930′s that was built by Jacob Ruppert who was known to be a wheeler dealer, and I would rather have someone like George with the future is now philosophy then Michael Burke and his CBS crew that brought us the “The Horace Clarke Era.” With Hal’s fixation on the cap, he maybe following Burke and not his father.

  8. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 8:22 pm

    Again, I ask, what happens to Zoilo when Grandy gets back?
    Doubt they keep running him out there every day…

    I hope he stays in he lineup. Don’t know why he can’t spell the corner OF’s and the DH? Or why Granderson couldn’t DH. I hate to see a guy that has proved himself get sent back. Romine, Adams, sure. They need to get more AAA at bats. Almonte though? Seems like going back down just retards his development.

  9. mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:23 pm

    As for Zolio,, it will be interesting… he almost has to become a bit player.
    =======================
    Unless there is a trade(s) or they DL/dfa Hafner for Zoilo to DH.
    His bat seems electric..

  10. mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:25 pm

    Hank-Did you see Ruth and Gehrig?

  11. mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:26 pm

    Exactly. Glorify is correct. He wasn’t that knowledgeable a baseball man to begin with and really didn’t improve. He fired anyone that got any credit from the press, Watson, Showalter, Gabe Paul etc. He was a megalomaniac.. I couldn’t care less this was his birthday. There were much better men born today. Good riddance to the whole family I say.
    =================
    I was there the day he was suspended and to this day don’t remember any day that had that kind of euphoria spreading thru the Stadium.

  12. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 8:26 pm

    I go back to the Yankee team of the 1930?s that was built by Jacob Ruppert who was known to be a wheeler dealer, and I would rather have someone like George with the future is now philosophy then Michael Burke and his CBS crew that brought us the “The Horace Clarke Era.” With Hal’s fixation on the cap, he maybe following Burke and not his father.

    George continued the devastation of the farm system Burke had begun. When Gage Paul left the picture it was all George and quick fixes. George would not make a pimple on Ruppert’s hindquarters.

    BTW “Hank” how old are you that you recall Jake Ruppert in the 1930′s?

  13. fantasygame101 July 4th, 2013 at 8:26 pm

    I can not worry or be excited about the offense bec. they are what they are. But the relievers are a different story, for at least 2 nights now, they can not finish the game without drob or mo with a big lead to protect.

  14. mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:29 pm

    Girardi has benefitted all year on the new arrivals sparking the team.
    Even these 2 new IF’s Gonzalez and Cruz , esp Gonzalez with men on, have given the team a jolt.
    Maybe Nix is overrated, they might have burnt him out.
    Would be careful with Stewart..

  15. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 8:29 pm

    mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:25 pm
    Hank-Did you see Ruth and Gehrig?

    If he did he is close to 90 or better. I cannot see anyone comparing Ruppert to Steinbrenner. Jake Ruppert let Ed Barrow, a baseball man run those teams. Hank is just making a case for George and his quick fix method.

  16. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 8:31 pm

    mick says:

    July 4, 2013 at 8:23 pmAs for Zolio,, it will be interesting… he almost has to become a bit player
    =======================
    Unless there is a trade(s) or they DL/dfa Hafner for Zoilo to DH.His bat seems electric..

    You’re right – a trade or a dl stint could change everything. Otherwise, based on past practice, I just don’t see Joe dfa’ing Hafner. I think a rotation is probably likely. I agree though, that he seems to belong at the mlb level… cool as a cucumber

  17. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 8:31 pm

    I was there the day he was suspended and to this day don’t remember any day that had that kind of euphoria spreading thru the Stadium,

    I have heard that so many times. I have to believe it. He was a bane on this franchise. He had the resources to be a good owner but he floundered them.

  18. mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:31 pm

    I wonder more about what Ruth would do in today’s game than Gehrig who appeared to be more of a line drive type hitter.

  19. mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:34 pm

    He was a bane on this franchise. He had the resources to be a good owner but he floundered them.
    ============================
    The thing about George was his flair for the dramatic and the ability to get the “star” of stars each year.
    From Reggie to Goose to Catfish to Winfield etc…alway around xmas or the New Year.

  20. mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:36 pm

    I was there the day he was suspended and to this day don’t remember any day that had that kind of euphoria spreading thru the Stadium,

    I have heard that so many times. I have to believe it.
    ============================
    The closest was the day Chambliss hit the HR in 76 after that 12 year layoff.

  21. mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:37 pm

    BTW “Hank” how old are you that you recall Jake Ruppert in the 1930?s?
    ==================
    He might be napping…

  22. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 8:39 pm

    Don’t know about you guys but I hate day games… I seldom get to see them and then I have nothing to follow in the evening.

  23. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 8:41 pm

    He might be napping…

    :)

  24. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 8:41 pm

    The closest was the day Chambliss hit the HR in 76 after that 12 year layoff.

    —-

    I was watching at 8 years old when it happened (first game i had watched on tv)… its the day I became a yankee fan

  25. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 8:44 pm

    mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:31 pm
    I wonder more about what Ruth would do in today’s game than Gehrig who appeared to be more of a line drive type hitter.

    Ruth’s OPS plus was somewhere around 206 which in general would mean he was twice as good as the average hitter of his day. He would have done well I presume. Maybe when Hank’s nap is over he will let us know.

  26. mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:47 pm

    Gehrig seemed more athletic than Ruth.
    I have heard from elders that Ruth would still be great today but he seemed out of shape and in a dead ball era where he was much stronger than most of the white players.
    His pitching expertise was astounding tho and not sure if he was a power or finesse pitcher.

  27. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 8:47 pm

    I was watching at 8 years old when it happened (first game i had watched on tv)… its the day I became a yankee fan

    That’s awesome! I was on a ship, anchored off of Puerto Cabello Venezuela. We were listening on AFR. I couldn’t believe it after all those years.

  28. mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:48 pm

    I was watching at 8 years old when it happened (first game i had watched on tv)… its the day I became a yankee fan
    =================
    Cosell roped you in.

  29. mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:50 pm

    I was at that game and it was bedlam.
    Fans jumped onto the field and grabbed clumps of grass and dirt.

  30. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 8:51 pm

    His pitching expertise was astounding tho and not sure if he was a power or finesse pitcher.

    Read in a book by Roger Creamer that he was often compared in the papers to a LH Walter Johnson.

    He was strapping prior to his later Yankee years. Don’t know when the out of shape stage started but early on he had a great arm from the OF.

  31. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 8:52 pm

    Gehrig would be more athletic. Played football at Columbia. Running back.

  32. mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:52 pm

    It was the moment that made that Chambliss HR.
    Reggie’s 3 HR’s were 3 different moments, none of them spontaneously ending the game.
    Boone’s HR was close…

  33. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 8:53 pm

    The most mind boggling Ruth stat (to me) was in 1920 he hit more home runs (54) than every team but one (can’t remember who) that had 64. Just can’t get my mind around that

  34. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 8:55 pm

    Cosell roped you in.

    —-

    Lol! Both infuriating and entertaining (even for a kid).

  35. mick July 4th, 2013 at 8:55 pm

    The most mind boggling Ruth stat (to me) was in 1920 he hit more home runs (54) than every team but one (can’t remember who) that had 64. Just can’t get my mind around that
    ====================
    For their time there were some great ballplayers but if you transported them to now I doubt they would hold up due to advances in society, they would have to adapt.

  36. mick July 4th, 2013 at 9:01 pm

    Sudden death extra inning 7th games are hard to beat in any sport.
    Every play is crucial…

  37. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 9:02 pm

    Yep. George was infatuated with Collins (turns out Kemp came the next year in 83).

    Didn’t Griffey senior come along with Collins? Another example of Steinbrenner’s limited baseball knowledge. He thought that two groundball hitters from an NL turf background would translate to big numbers at Yankee Stadium. He didn’t have a clue as usual.

  38. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 9:02 pm

    mick says:
    July 4, 2013 at 8:55 pmThe most mind boggling Ruth stat (to me) was in 1920 he hit more home runs (54) than every team but one (can’t remember who) that had 64. Just can’t get my mind around that
    ===================
    For their time there were some great ballplayers but if you transported them to now I doubt they would hold up due to advances in society, they would have to adapt.

    Agree totally. I’m not trying to compare different generations – just Ruth vs his generation. But the fact that there was such a huge seperation between Ruth and the rest of the league… can you imagine how in awe fans must have been?

  39. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 9:06 pm

    For their time there were some great ballplayers but if you transported them to now I doubt they would hold up due to advances in society, they would have to adapt.

    For one they would have to take PEDS.

    They adapted well to their time. Ruth made a huge position change. They changed how baseball was played. I’m sure given the situation great players adapt.

  40. mick July 4th, 2013 at 9:06 pm

    can you imagine how in awe fans must have been?
    ===================
    have met one who was a youth when Babe came around and in his 90′s still marveled.

  41. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 9:07 pm

    Hans Davenport says:
    July 4, 2013 at 9:02 pmYep. George was infatuated with Collins (turns out Kemp came the next year in 83)

    .Didn’t Griffey senior come along with Collins? Another example of Steinbrenner’s limited baseball knowledge. He thought that two groundball hitters from an NL turf background would translate to big numbers at Yankee Stadium. He didn’t have a clue as usual.

    Had to look it up but you’re right… Griffey came that year also

  42. tomingeorgia July 4th, 2013 at 9:07 pm

    Mister mick,
    Imagine Babe Ruth on steroids. He hit sixty when the baseballs were next to bean bags.

  43. mick July 4th, 2013 at 9:09 pm

    The Boone HR rivaled the Chambliss HR in that they both ended the game and put them in the WS.
    Boone being against the Sox made it sweeter but Chambliss was more sudden.
    Both teams lost in the WS , in 76 they were overmatched. In 03 they were beaten by a great pitching staff and some bad breaks injury wise.

  44. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 9:09 pm

    Agree totally. I’m not trying to compare different generations – just Ruth vs his generation.

    Which is the purpose of the OPS plus stat. Compares a player to his era. Impossible to do otherwise. Can’t compare a dead ball era player to even the 1930′s. With OPS plus however you can see that Mantle dominated offensively during his er, more so then DiMaggio during his.

  45. mick July 4th, 2013 at 9:11 pm

    Both teams lost in the WS , in 76 they were overmatched. In 03 they were beaten by a great pitching staff and some bad breaks injury wise.
    ===============
    Some might think it made the WS anticlimactic , winning like that, but there were other reasons they lost.

  46. tbone1570 July 4th, 2013 at 9:12 pm

    mick July 4th, 2013 at 9:01 pm

    Sudden death extra inning 7th games are hard to beat in any sport.
    Every play is crucial…

    ——————————————–
    I agree, but I think a game 7 OT in hockey beats it out, but not by alot. Baseball, by the nature of the game is only sudden death for the visiting team, as the home team gets a chance to tie/beat the visitors score.

    Hockey can change from defense to offense in the blink of an eye. Football can have this same change from defense to offense also, but how many OT playoff games do we usually see?

  47. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 9:13 pm

    Tom – still getting soaked? We’re under a flood warning here in sw VA but haven’t gotten anywhere near 6 inches

  48. mick July 4th, 2013 at 9:13 pm

    Imagine Babe Ruth on steroids. He hit sixty when the baseballs were next to bean bags.
    ============
    He was prolly on alchohol or hot dogs. Ruth on steroids able to catch up to a 95 mph FB would be scary.
    Josh Hamilton HR Derby at the Stadium scary.

  49. Hankflorida July 4th, 2013 at 9:14 pm

    I never saw Ruth play but was fortunate as a five year old to watch Gehrig play his last year and still remember listening to his “luckiest man alive” speech on the radio. My father was an avid Yankee fan and made me part of the bleacher crowd. I guess at my age, I do not have time to wait for the diamond in the rough players to mature and love the quick fix philosophy of tomorrow is now. I spend the summer in N.Y. hoping that when I go back to Florida, i can still enjoy the Yankees playing in October. Barrow and Weiss built farm systems with strategic trades similar to what the Tigers are doing today. I feel that if the Yankees do not make trades now, this season will be over before any of the injured players return, and if the Yanks are going to be competitive next year, they will have to make trades and sign free agents.

  50. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 9:17 pm

    Hank -

     was fortunate as a five year old to watch Gehrig play his last year and still remember listening to his “luckiest man alive” speech

    —-

    That is absolutely awesome!!!!

  51. mick July 4th, 2013 at 9:18 pm

    Todays game with multiple relief specialists throwing an inning or less would be tough to adjust to.
    Look at the amount of complete games back then.
    The game has evolved and is more specialized , you rarely see a complete game unless its a no hitter or perfect game.

  52. Pat M. July 4th, 2013 at 9:22 pm

    Many baseball people say that The Babe would have adapted quite well to todays game. His biggest challenge would be getting adjusted to playing under the lights.

  53. Pat M. July 4th, 2013 at 9:24 pm

    Oh and the bi-coastal trips via jet travel

  54. mick July 4th, 2013 at 9:24 pm

    Some of the old Yankees never struck out. Gehrig, Berra , Joe D…
    Were the pitchers just overmatched or not that good?
    Was this common on every team, have to check..

  55. tomingeorgia July 4th, 2013 at 9:26 pm

    chicken
    Cell after cell, none of them too big or violent, just one after another. Three more inches since noon. Batten the hatches, it’s all coming your way. I’m grateful I live on the highest hill in town. All the creeks are over their banks, and the bigger rivers are above flood stage.

    mick, hotdogs and beer can do great things.

  56. mick July 4th, 2013 at 9:26 pm

    even ruth never had a season where he struck out 100x

  57. mick July 4th, 2013 at 9:29 pm

    just noticed Ruth was never intentionally walked.
    when did that begin?

  58. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 9:31 pm

    Barrow and Weiss built farm systems with strategic trades similar to what the Tigers are doing today.

    I agree. In that case though, no one connected with this team, in any management position has the expertise to make a trade or trades that would have any impact. The Steinbrenner family, Levine, Cashman, do not have a clue to the worth of the players they would be trading or the value of anyone they would be getting back.

    Outside of superstar players swimming in awards or accolades they have no clue to any player’s talent level outside of numbers on the back of their baseball cards.
    It would likely do more damage if they made a move then it would do any good.

  59. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 9:35 pm

    Some of the old Yankees never struck out. Gehrig, Berra , Joe D…
    Were the pitchers just overmatched or not that good?
    Was this common on every team, have to check..

    Not certain about Gehrig, but DiMaggio and Yogi did not walk much either, when compared to say Mantle. It appears they swung early in the count and didn’t work deep into the count where they had two strikes as often.

  60. mick July 4th, 2013 at 9:39 pm

    Not certain about Gehrig, but DiMaggio and Yogi did not walk much either,
    ===================
    gehrig walked 100x per year but yogi and joe d not….they were contact hitters prolly early in the count…gehrig was prolly the best of them and more patient

  61. mick July 4th, 2013 at 9:42 pm

    seems like they started keeping records of IBB in 55 for mantle…so might just be a record keeping phenomenom.

  62. tomingeorgia July 4th, 2013 at 9:45 pm

    Who the hell thought Usher was the right guy to produce the music for the Macy’s fireworks show?

  63. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 9:56 pm

    Who the hell thought Usher was the right guy to produce the music for the Macy’s fireworks show?

    Yeah there’s an awful lot of that going around.

  64. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 9:58 pm

    Sorry guys… been out of socket for a while – my dad called and even lohud has to take a backseat when that happens!

    Tom – hang in there!

  65. Hans Davenport July 4th, 2013 at 9:59 pm

    Likely old news but Nunez moving on to Trenton.

    http://www.rotoworld.com/player/mlb/4433

  66. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 10:00 pm

    Not certain about Gehrig, but DiMaggio and Yogi did not walk much either,

    —-

    Before my time but from what I’ve read, Yogi was a notorious bad ball hitter… you really had to work to walk him

  67. bruceb July 4th, 2013 at 10:09 pm

    Raul’s still cool as he smacks another one out of the yard in Texas.

  68. tomingeorgia July 4th, 2013 at 10:11 pm

    Does anyone know why every team is wearing gray hats today?

  69. CompassRosy July 4th, 2013 at 10:13 pm

    Larry Stone ?@StoneLarry
    That’s Ibanez’s seventh homer off a lefty this year

    Todd Dybas ?@Todd_Dybas
    Ibanez. Homer. His first came when the Declaration of Independence was signed, and he continues today. Happy fourth.

    :)

  70. CompassRosy July 4th, 2013 at 10:16 pm

    tomingeorgia July 4th, 2013 at 10:11 pm
    Does anyone know why every team is wearing gray hats today?

    ~ ~ ~ ~

    they’re not all gray (white home, gray road) but they’re the 4th of July hats . . .

    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151412517411927.1073741839.7157811926&type=3

  71. bruceb July 4th, 2013 at 10:17 pm

    Just for you, Tom.

    For the sixth consecutive year, MLB Clubs will wear specially designed “Stars & Stripes” caps from New Era on Independence Day as part of Major League Baseball’s ongoing fundraising and awareness initiatives for Welcome Back Veterans, which addresses the needs of returning veterans and their families.

    Major League Baseball has committed $23 million to Welcome Back Veterans (welcomebackveterans.org) since its inception in 2008, and will once again donate 100% of its net proceeds from sales of the caps to Welcome Back Veterans as part of its contribution to the program. The caps will have the American flag etched into the team’s logo, with white or gray crowns and blue or red brims and buttons (the Toronto Blue Jays hat will once again incorporate a Maple Leaf design instead of the “Stars & Stripes”).

  72. tomingeorgia July 4th, 2013 at 10:24 pm

    Thank you folks, but I still don’t understand why they are gray or white. What’s that got to do with Independence Day? Like the cause, but I still don’t understand the marketing principle behind it.

  73. CompassRosy July 4th, 2013 at 10:24 pm

    Not stats we have seen in recent (and even not-so-recent) years . . .

    ~ ~ ~
    Shannon Drayer ?@shannondrayer
    Mariners have homered in 12 consecutive games and out homered the Rangers 6-3 in this series.
    ~ ~ ~

    Now, if they could just hit more singles and doubles, we might have something ;-)

  74. tomingeorgia July 4th, 2013 at 10:27 pm

    Did anyone see the jets on Puig just now?

  75. tomingeorgia July 4th, 2013 at 10:36 pm

    Night, folks.

  76. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 10:38 pm

    Night Tom… keep to the high ground :) I’m prepared for whatever weather GA can throw at me

  77. Doreen July 4th, 2013 at 10:39 pm

    Nunie had a bad night on Trenton. 0 for 5 with 2ks and an inning ending rally ending DP.

  78. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 10:41 pm

    Doreen says:

    July 4, 2013 at 10:39 pm
    Nunie had a bad night on Trenton. 0 for 5 with 2ks and an inning ending rally ending DP.

    —-

    Even so, I can’t wait for him to come back!!

  79. Rich in NJ July 4th, 2013 at 10:42 pm

    “Many baseball people say that The Babe would have adapted quite well to todays game. His biggest challenge would be getting adjusted to playing under the lights.”

    Except that as long as we are putting him in the late 20th/early 21st century (rather than dropping him off of a time machine on to the field with a parachute), we can reasonably assume that he would have been playing under the lights since high school, or at least the mLs. So it would probably be as easy for him as any other player.

    I think his biggest adjustment would have been his ability to handle the numerous additional off the field distractions that weren’t around when he was playing.

  80. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 10:51 pm

    I think his biggest adjustment would have been his ability to handle the numerous additional off the field distractions that weren’t around when he was playing.

    ——-

    Agree. Also wonder if he had the tangibles to make it to mlb… I don’t know if he was a power pitcher, did he have the velo to be signed? What was his time in the 60? Would he have qualified for consideration? Just wondering

  81. Pat M. July 4th, 2013 at 11:03 pm

    H ehas a very strong arm and hit baseballs 500 feet from the left side of the plate…..He would have caught some scouts eye, no ??? Besides he had insanely fast hands and eye blinking bat speed

  82. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 11:08 pm

    Pat M – lol. Probably so… just saying I think baseball today is wrapped up in particular numbers that may/may not translate to success

  83. chicken_stanley July 4th, 2013 at 11:17 pm

    Goodnight all

  84. Rich in NJ July 5th, 2013 at 12:51 am

    I just noticed that Carlos Gomez is having a sick year.

    145 wRC+. His prior career high was 105.

  85. UnKnown July 5th, 2013 at 1:00 am

    “However, being that we have to play at home vs. Baltimore tomorrow, I am taking a collection so that we can fly Unknown into the Bronx for the homestand.”

    YF – :grin: I would be all for it. In all seriousness though, I’m just glad that the Yankees always seem to handle the Twins so easily. Lots of fun the past four days, but unfortunately it’s back to watching on the tube now.

    I always say in order to get a good read/temperature of a team I think it’s huge if you can watch them play live. You pick up on so many things that just doesn’t come across on T.V.

    This team has the ability to stay competitive all year long and be fighting for a playoff spot the last couple of weeks in the season. Margin for error is razor thin though. Have to come up with clutch hits and play all around fundamentally sound ball and they will be successful. Definitely a different club than what I am used to seeing, but man did they take care of business this week. WooHoo!!

    That’s my take. Go Yanks!!

  86. yankeepankee July 5th, 2013 at 2:00 am

    Jose Quintana, K’s 11 Orioles for White Sox today.
    A young lefty that Cashman gave away for nothing.
    A disgrace. Cashman’s made too many mistakes and his farm system kills young arms or lets the wrong ones go to other teams.
    And other teams get Puig, Cespedes, Darvish, Sano.
    We get fringy Musty and Garcia etc.
    Cashman must go.

  87. JimK July 5th, 2013 at 7:59 am

    I see the blog has been silent since 2:00 AM, and while I did watch part’s of the Twins series I was mostly out and about. However, I must say, even though it was the Twins the Yankees did what they were supposed to do against a weaker opponent and what they failed to do against the Mets and the Astros. With the exception of the Tigers the Yankees own the AL Central, but for the Yankees to contend they must start winning in the AL East, where they are only two games over .500 and I believe the majority of those wins were in the early part of the season; they are even worse against the AL West where they are under .500 and in interleague play they are also below .500.
    As far as the Yankees apparent reluctance to pursue the “name” international free agents, I still believe this goes back to the infamous Kei Igawa and Jose Contreras signings, and as successful as Matsui was as a Yankee I believe he under-performed their expectations; he was a solid player in the O’Neill tradition, but was outshined by Ichiro who will make the HOF.
    On Almonte, I hope to see him stay in lineup even after the return of Granderson; I like Granderson, but I still believe the trade for Jackson was a mistake based entirely on the age difference.
    Finally, having been born in 1952 my initial exposure to the famous Gehrig speech was in the “Pride of the Yankees,” and I also watched Babe Ruth but unfortunately the Babe I watched was actually William Bendix and it was not a particularly good film.

  88. Hassey July 5th, 2013 at 8:57 am

    I just literally bumped into Larry Rothschild in Rock Center…I couldn;t think of anythign brilliantly insightful to ask him, so I let him pass in anonimity


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