The LoHud Yankees Blog

A New York Yankees blog by Chad Jennings and the staff of The Journal News


State of the organization: Bullpen

Posted by: Chad Jennings - Posted in Misc on Nov 08, 2013 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

Chris Stewart, Mike Trout

We’ll finally wrap up this state of the organization series by looking at the Yankees bullpen, a source of consistency through most of the 2013 season, now facing a series of questions and challenges heading into 2014. Losing Mariano Rivera is is the biggest blow to the bullpen, but it’s not the only one.

KelleyClaiborneDave Robertson (third year of arbitration)
Shawn Kelley (third year of arbitration)
Preston Claiborne (not yet arbitration eligible)
Says a lot about the current state of the bullpen that these are the three most-experienced relievers coming back next year: A long-time setup man, a better-than-expected spring addition, and a mid-season call-up who’s hardly a lock to make the big league roster out of spring training. Of course, long-relievers like David Phelps and Adam Warren have bullpen experience, but as far as full-time, typical relief pitchers, these three are the only returning Yankees relievers who had at least 10 relief appearances last season. That means a significant bit of turnover heading into 2014. Given the lack of late-inning experience, the Yankees could certainly be in the market for a free agent closer/setup option, but there’s still no doubt Robertson will be counted on in some significant capacity. Whether it’s back to the eighth inning or into the ninth inning, Robertson has emerged as the best from a series of Yankees relief prospects (Mark Melancon, J.B. Cox, even Joba Chamberlain). He’s going to take on a new level of significance and attention now that Mariano Rivera is gone. Behind Robertson, Kelley emerged as a go-to strikeout pitcher last year, and he should get a chance to play a similar role going forward. Claiborne might have a bit of a leg up, but he’ll still have to prove himself in spring training to beat out a series of on-the-verge alternatives.

CabralBetances (2)READY REPLACEMENTS
This list is a long one, beginning with Dellin Betances (who’s out of options) and Cesar Cabral (who might be the top lefty specialist in the system). Both have big arms, and both took steps forward this year. Betances shined after a move to the Triple-A bullpen, and Cabral was effective in limited chances after a September call-up. Right now, those two have to be considered front runners (status that could change with a poor spring or a series of winter additions). But the Yankees young bullpen options certainly don’t end with Betances and Cabral. From 2009 to 2011, the Yankees drafted a series of college pitchers who have moved steadily — and in some cases, quickly — through the minor leagues. Claiborne got to the big leagues last year; Chase Whitley and Mark Montgomery spent the year in Triple-A; Danny Burawa and Tommy Kahnle had big strikeout totals in Double-A; Branden Pinder is a big guy with a big arm, and he was in big league camp last year. It’s often hard to predict which relievers will emerge and which will stall — Claiborne did not seem to be the on-the-verge option at this time last year — but the Yankees do have several to choose from. Most interesting of the bunch is probably Montgomery, who entered this season as the Yankees top relief prospect based on legitimately overwhelming numbers in Class-A and Double-A. He was generating Robertson comparisons, but he also struggled through shoulder and back issues (and disappointing numbers) in 2013. If he bounces back, he could emerge quickly.

MontgomeryRamirezTOP PROSPECT
In the past seven years — probably more than that, actually — no Yankees pitching prospect has made a bigger bullpen splash than Joba Chamberlain. Which is a reminder that it’s hard to pick out any team’s top bullpen prospect. Chamberlain was a starting pitcher in the minors, then he made his big league debut as a dominant bullpen arm. Phil Hughes had his first extended big league success as a reliever. Former Yankees rotation prospect Tyler Clippard has become a terrific setup man in Washington. It’s easy to look into the Yankees current minor league system and pick out a guy like Montgomery as a high-potential reliever — even after a bad season, there’s still significant hope for this guy — but guys like Jose Ramirez and Shane Greene can’t be overlooked here. Even low-level starters like Jose Campos and Rafael De Paula could, in theory, transition to the bullpen at some point and emerge as terrific relievers. Right now the Yankees have a handful of fringy relief prospects pitching in the Arizona Fall League, giving the Yankees a longer look, which matters in a role like this where surprises can emerge at any time.

RobertsonSTATE OF THE ORGANIZATION
Bullpens are quite often a mystery. The Yankees have been in the unusual position of having a remarkable force of stability for the better part of two decades, but now Rivera has retired and things have to change. What the Yankees have in abundance is a series of possibilities. Most of them are unproven and inexperienced — and that obviously brings its own series of issues — but there are a lot of them, and that’s not a bad thing when it comes to something as typically unreliable as the bullpen. Let there be no doubt, not all of the young relief possibilities will be up to the task, but if one or two can emerge, and Robertson can transition to the ninth inning, and one of the young rotation options can settle into the long relief job, the Yankees bullpen could be just fine next season. It’s just going to be very different and difficult to predict. As we saw with Claiborne this year, a young pitcher can come up and have significant success for a while, only to see it disappear in a flash. There could be a lot of trial and error in this bullpen, but the Red Sox and Cardinals proved that’s not a deal breaker in building a championship-caliber team.

Associated Press photo; headshots of Claiborne, Kelley, Betances, Cabral, Ramirez, Montgomery and Robertson

 
 

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57 Responses to “State of the organization: Bullpen”

  1. blake November 8th, 2013 at 3:25 pm

    “blake – Personally, I think it’s as simple as taking the best player available. Drafting and developing players is such a crapshoot to begin with, to add further risk to the process simply increases the odds of a fail. I, for one, am a fan of drafting college players. The colleges as a whole, do a much better job of fine tuning mechanics and instilling expectations in their players.”

    I think you know a lot more what you have with a college guy…..but the top college guys (the really talented ones” all get gobbled up in the top 10 picks usually. So the Yanks have taken flyers on talented high school guys trying to get that level of talent where they pick…….and obviously there is a lot more risk in a 18 year old kid who has faced high schoolers than a 21 year old college guy who has faced A ball or better pitching for the last 3 years.

  2. blake November 8th, 2013 at 3:28 pm

    I agree that they should draft more college guys and I was happy last year when they used 2 of those top 3 picks on guys in college…..they are just lower risk.

    I understand the reasoning behind drafting high schoolers….they are younger and you have more time with them and often their talent falls to later in the draft……but there is also a ton more risk that they bust.

    It’s a much bigger jump from high school to pro ball than from Div 1 college ball to pro ball…..major college conferences have better competition than a lot of the lower level minor leagues do.

  3. DONNYBROOK November 8th, 2013 at 3:35 pm

    When it comes to SP’s, I would draft top notch High Schoolers. The College coaches abuse their Chuckers to no end. You draft a college pitcher and the odometer is already reading 100,000.

  4. yanks61 November 8th, 2013 at 3:38 pm

    mick November 8th, 2013 at 2:17 pm
    Just want to say that the recent influx of posters are a breath of fresh air.

    So much so, that the usual suspects seem to have taken a leave of absence as they reveled in their own negativity, disguised as reality.

    You know the saying, “Misery loves company.”

    It’s been a lot more pleasant and optimistic here lately and I thank the newbies for that.

    Stay the course, but be ready for the Doom Platoon, as I feel they are lurking and will challenge you as soon as they smell the blood of a “bad” move.

    Agreed Mick. But whatever the reasons are, I have to say that the last couple days of threads have been among the best I can remember in a very, very long time. The new guys have added tgreatly o the quality posters who’ve been here for years and have posted over those last few days and everyone concerned has really elevated the conversation: no acrimonious name calling, no pontificating know-it-alls, just good solid baseball talk without trying to intimidate or shout down others. And people actually willing to listen to reasonable proposals and exchange of ideas. Even willing, would you believe, to admit that they may be wrong in their estimâtes of how things may develop or décisions may be made!

    It’s getting late in my neck of the woods and I’m heading off now but I wanted to say Bravo to you all! It’s been incredibly good reading.

  5. JobaTipsHisCap November 8th, 2013 at 3:43 pm

    Cashman has been awesome.

    http://www.faniq.com/blog/Yank.....Blog-72276

  6. DONNYBROOK November 8th, 2013 at 3:46 pm

    Getting back to the draft picks, an organization either has people with an “eye” for talent or they do not. You can sight timing, injuries, high picks, whatever, but like a stick that consistently K’s, it’s simply BS excuses for not cuttin’ it.

  7. wanzies222 November 8th, 2013 at 3:46 pm

    DONNY –

    Yes, and no. There is a school of thought that says if they can’t stand the workload in college, they will flame out in the pros. However, you, as a drafting organization, have to know which coaches are abusive regarding workload. Believe me when I say, they know. All of the other college coaches know, as well.

    That said, I think there is a fine balance that can be reached if you can get a guy from the right program, who has developed physically in concert with that increased workload and has a bit of an edge. Dumb luck doesn’t hurt either.

  8. wanzies222 November 8th, 2013 at 3:48 pm

    DONNY –

    The yes and no was to the abusive college coaches… agree, some teams get it, some don’t. Some also have a bad plan. Yankees fall somewhere in that Bermuda Triangle.

  9. blake November 8th, 2013 at 3:54 pm

    “The new guys have added tgreatly o the quality posters who’ve been here for years and have posted over those last few days and everyone concerned has really elevated the conversation: no acrimonious name calling, no pontificating know-it-alls, just good solid baseball talk without trying to intimidate or shout down others. And people actually willing to listen to reasonable proposals and exchange of ideas. Even willing, would you believe, to admit that they may be wrong in their estimâtes of how things may develop or décisions may be made!”

    agree.

  10. bigdan22 November 8th, 2013 at 4:09 pm

    blake November 8th, 2013 at 3:09 pm

    “I’m pretty certain Cano is coming back. Probably at 8/200 or something close to that like Blake said. Don’t like that deal but who knows. Maybe he’ll age like Jeter. We’d all sign up for that.”

    “lets hope….if they could actually build a cheaper and more efficient team around him then his contract wouldn’t be a huge deal even if he did decline in the 2nd half of it because Arod and Tex would be gone”

    This touches on a thought that’s been in my head for a little while now. The reason why the Yanks’ payroll exploded early last decade was not so much about them signing the big free agents. There was some of that, e.g. Giambi, Mussina. It was more about keeping their home grown talent. The Yanks went from a top 2 or 3 payroll team in the late 90s to No. 1 by $45MM early last decade because the core four and Bernie all had to get paid around the same time.

    Now lets reach out 5-6 years in the future. Who, among the among the players in their organization now, will the Yanks be paying large? Pineda?? Cano seems like an outlier. And when you consider that there are less and less attractive impact free agents hitting the market, maybe we won’t be paying any new Giambis or Mussinas either.

    This is a pretty highly speculative exercise, but it’s possible, after Arod, Tex and CC, there may not be a lot of heavy contracts on the books. Other than Cano of course.

  11. blake November 8th, 2013 at 4:16 pm

    Yes the Yankees have paid up big time to keep their own over the years…..they have paid and overpaid for them and that’s certainly helped keep their annual payroll high. Those 1 year deals for Mo and Andy are big money per year…..they have had to sign and re-sign Jeter 3 times now…..and not only that they have paid to keep other players they have acquired like Arod and CC.

    The Sox on the other hand have tended to let players go rather than get in bidding wars against other teams and themselves to keep them……I think it’s directly led to them getting better deals on players like Pedroia…..these players know if they want to stay then they have to play by Boston’s rules. Players with the Yankees think they call the shots because that’s the way it’s always been.

  12. bigdan22 November 8th, 2013 at 4:21 pm

    JobaTipsHisCap November 8th, 2013 at 3:43 pm
    Cashman has been awesome.

    http://www.faniq.com/blog/Yank…..Blog-72276

    Interesting. This actually dovetails nicely into a theory I proposed a few times on this blog. It started with, “always trade your prospect who’s most likely to be over-rated.” I expanded to mean, the Yanks should always trade their number one prospect. I’ve been thinking about modifying that to mean the Yanks should always trade their top three prospects.

    Historically, the Yanks top prospects have been almost uniformly over-rated, and if traded at the appropriate time, would have yielded some huge hauls. I’m not sure that’s an accident. It seems like, the last 20 years or so, their best home grown talent has been further down the list.

    Now this all assumes that your top prospects have real value like Nick Johnson or Ruben Rivera or Phil Hughes. That’s not the case now. But maybe next year at this time.

  13. joeman November 8th, 2013 at 4:23 pm

    just taking a wild guess here that a 34..35 year old Cano won’t be half the player he is now

  14. mick November 8th, 2013 at 4:36 pm

    call the cano contract a front end loaded deal …hopefully not too big a rear end.

  15. mick November 8th, 2013 at 4:40 pm

    The new guys have added tgreatly o the quality posters who’ve been here for years and have posted over those last few days and everyone concerned has really elevated the conversation: no acrimonious name calling, no pontificating know-it-alls, just good solid baseball talk without trying to intimidate or shout down others. And people actually willing to listen to reasonable proposals and exchange of ideas. Even willing, would you believe, to admit that they may be wrong in their estimâtes of how things may develop or décisions may be made!
    =================
    Very well said Yanks61.

    Less ego, more intercourse.

  16. MTU November 8th, 2013 at 4:49 pm

    “Less ego, more intercourse.”

    And more “coitusey” too.

    :)

  17. blake November 8th, 2013 at 4:52 pm

    mick says:
    November 8, 2013 at 4:36 pm
    call the cano contract a front end loaded deal …hopefully not too big a rear end.

    Luxury tax is done off the AAV and that’s what the yanks seem to care most about so front loading the deal wouldn’t help that

  18. mick November 8th, 2013 at 4:56 pm

    Luxury tax is done off the AAV and that’s what the yanks seem to care most about so front loading the deal wouldn’t help that
    =======================
    What I meant was that if he got say 8/200, hopefully the 1st 6-7 years take in the likely decline in years 7-8.

  19. bigdan22 November 8th, 2013 at 4:57 pm

    Let’s for a moment test the new found civility on this blog.

    I think folks on here are way too hard on Nunie. Now, objectively he is a pretty awful baseball player so that may have something to do with it. But subjectively, I really don’t have a bad feeling about this guy. Has his glove ever really cost us a big game? Now take Swisher for example. Or post season (most of) Arod, or Soriano or that whole lineup in 2004. Now that’s some serious post season fail. I actually have a good feeling about Nunie and Detroit.

    I think the Yanks should just let him play his SS heart out when Jeter goes on the DL. And if that really worries you, sign that Ryan guy. He’ll be cheap. But trade for Castro or Andrus? They don’t have the pieces but if they did count me out. Lets be objective about Castro a minute. Sure he’s young and seems to have great potential, but statistically he can’t field or hit. Most folks would have a problem with that. And Andrus may have one of the scariest contracts on the planet.

    So lets all just get along and let Nunie play. I’m willing to bet he will not be the tipping point for the 2014 New York Yankees.

  20. mick November 8th, 2013 at 4:57 pm

    take in meaning make up for

  21. mick November 8th, 2013 at 4:59 pm

    Coitusey…..nice play on words, did you just make that up?

  22. blake November 8th, 2013 at 5:00 pm

    “I think folks on here are way too hard on Nunie. Now, objectively he is a pretty awful baseball player so that may have something to do with it. But subjectively, I really don’t have a bad feeling about this guy. ”

    I hyperbolic some of the stuff I say about him because it’s fun…..not mean spirited but fun…..he’s not very good though and he shouldn’t be a starter for the Yankees .

  23. joeman November 8th, 2013 at 5:02 pm

    how about a 5/150 for Cano

  24. bigdan22 November 8th, 2013 at 5:04 pm

    Blake, he shouldn’t be a starter for anybody. That’s a given. But sarcasm aside, he’s really not the problem right now. There’s just so much other stuff to worry about.

  25. mick November 8th, 2013 at 5:05 pm

    Let’s for a moment test the new found civility on this blog.
    ==============================
    Nuney was never a big bone of contention at LoHud.
    It was more personality conflicts than anything else.
    Yanks61 said it best when he wrote:

    “no pontificating know-it-alls, just good solid baseball talk without trying to intimidate or shout down others.”

  26. MTU November 8th, 2013 at 5:08 pm

    Yes Mick.

    I did.

  27. mick November 8th, 2013 at 5:09 pm

    how about a 5/150 for Cano
    =====================

    Cano is aiming for at least 200m.
    8/200 is like giving him an extension now of 3/50 instead of waiting to age 35.
    So in this sense it is frontloaded.

    30m is too much the AAV hit anyway.

  28. blake November 8th, 2013 at 5:10 pm

    “So lets all just get along and let Nunie play. I’m willing to bet he will not be the tipping point for the 2014 New York Yankees.”

    He might tip a few people over in the stands with his throws

  29. mick November 8th, 2013 at 5:11 pm

    Coitusey sounds like an old jewish brooklyn mans version of courtesy.

    Either that or Groucho Marx dangling that big cigar.

    Or George Burns.

  30. joeman November 8th, 2013 at 5:11 pm

    mick November 8th, 2013 at 5:09 pm
    how about a 5/150 for Cano
    =====================

    Cano is aiming for at least 200m.
    8/200 is like giving him an extension now of 3/50 instead of waiting to age 35.
    So in this sense it is frontloaded.

    30m is too much the AAV hit anyway.
    ——————————————————
    just cutting in half of what he reported to have asked for…this way at 36 if he’s still got he can go get another deal

  31. bigdan22 November 8th, 2013 at 5:14 pm

    “He might tip a few people over in the stands with his throws.”

    Tell them to bring a glove lol. Reminds me. I was at an AFL game a few years ago sitting just behind the dugout. Almost got hit by a slicing foul ball. Scariest moment of my life.

  32. blake November 8th, 2013 at 5:14 pm

    bigdan22 says:
    November 8, 2013 at 5:04 pm
    Blake, he shouldn’t be a starter for anybody. That’s a given. But sarcasm aside, he’s really not the problem right now. There’s just so much other stuff to worry about.

    Well he personally isn’t a problem but not having a 3B or SS is a big problem and he’s not an answer to either of those which is a problem

  33. mick November 8th, 2013 at 5:16 pm

    just cutting in half of what he reported to have asked for…this way at 36 if he’s still got he can go get another deal
    =====================
    If he’s asking 10/300 then we offer 5/150 he will search elsewhere for what he really expects to get.

    8/200.

    Then he can ask for 8/250 and we can offer 8/225, which still sounds high.

  34. joeman November 8th, 2013 at 5:16 pm

    lets calm down he’s not a Steve Sax

  35. bigdan22 November 8th, 2013 at 5:16 pm

    “how about a 5/150 for Cano”

    Players in his position never seem to go for the less years, less money, higher avg thing. This is their payday. They look at it as a once in a lifetime opportunity.

  36. ron November 8th, 2013 at 5:17 pm

    Problem with nunez is,he is a career .679 ops hitter,and he is better against lefties,bad obp,and no power.10 hr in 752 ab.
    Combine that with not the gratest defense,and i’ll pass,easily.Nunez is not the answer.
    If he played great defense,and crushed righties,i’d have no issues,especially from a ss,and players stats are crashing back down to earth.
    Except for the few elite players,30 hr is a task nowadays.
    It makes jeters accomplishments that much more special.
    Jeter for a ss put up insane numbers,smack in the middle of the steroid era.

  37. joeman November 8th, 2013 at 5:17 pm

    mick November 8th, 2013 at 5:16 pm
    just cutting in half of what he reported to have asked for…this way at 36 if he’s still got he can go get another deal
    =====================
    If he’s asking 10/300 then we offer 5/150 he will search elsewhere for what he really expects to get.

    8/200.

    Then he can ask for 8/250 and we can offer 8/225, which still sounds high.
    ———————————————————–
    they give him 8/200-225 they are nuts

  38. blake November 8th, 2013 at 5:19 pm

    joeman says:
    November 8, 2013 at 5:16 pm
    lets calm down he’s not a Steve Sax

    Yea…Sax was a better hitter probably

  39. blake November 8th, 2013 at 5:20 pm

    Cano is gonna cost 200 million if they keep him

  40. joeman November 8th, 2013 at 5:20 pm

    blake November 8th, 2013 at 5:19 pm
    joeman says:
    November 8, 2013 at 5:16 pm
    lets calm down he’s not a Steve Sax

    Yea…Sax was a better hitter probably

    —————————–
    LOL

  41. bigdan22 November 8th, 2013 at 5:20 pm

    “Well he personally isn’t a problem but not having a 3B or SS is a big problem and he’s not an answer to either of those which is a problem”

    This team is short two front end starters and a third baseman. They are not sure who will catch for them or DH and in RF you have replacement at best. The Yanks view Nunie as their backup SS and right now that’s a minor concern compared to the above.

  42. joeman November 8th, 2013 at 5:22 pm

    blake November 8th, 2013 at 5:20 pm
    Cano is gonna cost 200 million if they keep him

    ——————————————-
    for me it’s all about the years..don’t care about the money, I’ll pay for a good product that still young

  43. joeman November 8th, 2013 at 5:26 pm

    do I want Cano here ..Yes
    do I want to give him 8 years ..No
    would I give him 25-30 mil per..yes

  44. chicken_stanley November 8th, 2013 at 5:30 pm

    This may surprise everyone because I typically seem to be down on a lot of players… I haven’t given up on Nunie yet. I liked how he looked offensively and defensively in the 2nd half of the season. He’ll likely never be a quality starter but he could still be valuable as a SS 3B backup. My biggest concern is how fragile he seems.

  45. bigdan22 November 8th, 2013 at 5:33 pm

    http://www.cbssports.com/mlb/w.....ks-meeting

    Can somebody tell me what to make of this? On one hand, it sounds like the days of the Old Man. “Clear out everybody. We’re here to win and buy.” But then there’s the 189 statement. How can you be aggressive in the FA market and still stay under budget? Are they betting Arod will be out all year?

  46. sammiejohnson November 8th, 2013 at 5:34 pm

    I do not think there is any real chance that Cano & his agents will leave $50M+ on the table now and then have to go back out in the market in 5 years. At age 36 Cano would probably be lucky to ever get that $50M. It’s all about the money and the years he can get now while at the top of his game. I am sure Cano probably views this as his last MLB contract.

  47. joeman November 8th, 2013 at 5:40 pm

    sammiejohnson November 8th, 2013 at 5:34 pm
    I do not think there is any real chance that Cano & his agents will leave $50M+ on the table now and then have to go back out in the market in 5 years. At age 36 Cano would probably be lucky to ever get that $50M. It’s all about the money and the years he can get now while at the top of his game. I am sure Cano probably views this as his last MLB contract.

    —————————————————————
    well then I hope it’s lesson learned by the NYY

  48. joeman November 8th, 2013 at 5:45 pm

    C&P

    Yahoo! Sports’ Jeff Passan reports that the Yankees are “going to be bold” in the bidding for Japanese right-hander Masahiro Tanaka.

    Passan goes even further, adding that the Yanks “are “willing to spend more money than any team ever has bidding on a Japanese player.” A big reason why Tanaka appeals to the club is because the posting fee they’d have to pay would not count against the luxury tax. Executives told Passan they believe Tanaka’s posting fee will top $75 million. The right-hander will likely require an additional $50 million to sign to a contract.

  49. Vince November 8th, 2013 at 5:48 pm

    I maintain throughout the offseason, Tanaka has to be their one major goal. If nothing else works out, they HAVE to sign this guy. He impacts this offseason the most and the next few years the most. If him and Pineda pan out? The Yankees are in a whole different position.

  50. pkyankfan69 November 8th, 2013 at 5:50 pm

    Good news on Tanaka… I could care less what the posting fee is, it’s only money… Getting a 25 year old who projects as a #2 for a 5-6 year deal for $10M (ish) per year with no draft pick compensation makes it well worth it… Should help us both short and long term… Even if he ends up being an average pitcher $10M per year isn’t bad value.

  51. joeman November 8th, 2013 at 5:52 pm

    right now Tanaka should be their main focus…

  52. Against All Odds November 8th, 2013 at 5:59 pm

    I’m in favor of Tanaka but it once again shows how bad they have been developing pitchers from within. I how he turns out to be a good pitcher. It will give the kids some more time.

  53. wanzies222 November 8th, 2013 at 6:00 pm

    MTU & mick –

    I think the Curly Howard Estate would take umbrage at the use of “coitusey”; the mispronunciation of “certainly” to “soitenly” may have been copyrighted…. just kidding, but that is certainly a Stooges malaprop.

    FWIW, Nunez, for whatever reason, hasn’t been able to channel his athleticism, particularly in the infield. His throwing mechanics are, to be kind, awful. His plate discipline is improving, but he falls into that trap each year – he either gets injured or buried on the big club so he does not get consistent at bats.

    He might be one of those guys that would be a fit in a big park, where line drives play well and he can use his speed. I could see him an OF in SD, SF or even Seattle. Maybe even the Mets… but my eyes tell me he’s an OF in a big NL park.

  54. wanzies222 November 8th, 2013 at 6:06 pm

    New one >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

  55. MTU November 8th, 2013 at 6:09 pm

    Steve-

    I thought it fit well w Mick’s statement on intercourse on the blog.

    As far as the increased coitusey goes. I hope it goes on w/o interruption.

    ;)

  56. UpState November 8th, 2013 at 6:09 pm

    Trade him, trade him anywhere….probably doesn’t his weight with RISP.
    Cannot think of a worse fielding SS or 3B in the ML.
    If everybody loves him – he should be tradeable.
    Please.
    Please trade Nunez.

    (but really – how would you ‘sell’ his value ???)

  57. Duh Innings II November 8th, 2013 at 6:14 pm

    JobaTipsHisCap November 8th, 2013 at 3:43 pm
    Cashman has been awesome.

    ————

    Really? He has won exactly ONE World Series in the last thirteen seasons only because he splurged on Sabathia, Teixiera, and Burnett and he had The Core Four Gene Micheal two general managers removed from him signed and developed for Watson who gave them all a chance. Watson made Rivera a closer, kept Pettitte in the rotation, and replaced Tony Fernandez with Jeter at SS in 1996. Take away Sabathia, Teixiera, and Burnett and the Yankees have no World Series championships after 2000, just two bad World Series losses to inferior teams with far lower payrolls. Bob Brenly and Jack McKeon – really? And let’s talk about the 1996, 1998-2000 winners. Cashman wasn’t the GM for 1996. Syd Thrift could’ve been the 1998 Yankees GM and the Yanks still would’ve won it all 1998-2000. The 2000 Yankees had better won the World Series over their crosstown rivals the Mets or Cashman AND Torre would’ve been F-I-R-E-D fired. Big deal about 1999 as if they lost it Atlanta gets revenge for 1996 and they were a pretty damn good team 1991-99 (five World Series appearances.) So the Yanks win three out of four World Series 1996, 1998-2000. Lose the 2000 World Series and still keep your job, ok, well, you’d lose it if you lost the 2001 and 2003 WS, too (three straight World Series losses.) Oh yeah, Cashman would’ve never got a job in the Yankee organization if his father wasn’t a pal at the horse farm George Steinbrenner kept thoroughbred horses at.

    Cashman looks like a younger version of the creep John Candy and Jim Belushi had in the back of their paddywagon in the movie “Only The Lonely”.

    He gave old hasbeens Wells and Suzuki $26.9M for 2013-14 over giving age 28-29 Melky Cabrera and 30-31 Russell Martin $33M for 2013-14. Who would be the better combination for the Yankees right now? Cabrera and Martin who would be 30 and 32, respectively, going into 2015!!! No (possibly) overpaying for McCann. Trading for Ryan Hanigan would be gravy, a bonus, not an absolute necessity or something to even think about as the Yanks still would’ve have Stewart, Cervelli, Romine, and Murphy. If they had kept Martin they could’ve traded any one or even two of their other catchers and no big deal with Gary Sanchez down the road. Re-sign Stewart and trade him and either Cervelli, Romine, and Murphy and that’s more pitching, a young outfielder, or a young thirdbaseman.

    He signs Hafner over trading for Soriano in the offseason and spare me Soriano would’ve cost more than Corey Black then when he wouldn’t have. The Cubs wanted to get rid of Soriano’s contract before the season began. One could argue the Yanks could’ve given up less than Black before the season because there was no desperation like there was when they traded for Soriano since the season didn’t even begin and the Yanks didn’t get Wells yet. The Yanks would’ve still signed Hafner Soriano on the team or not. Wells would’ve never been traded for.

    Let’s look at this team now, today. No C, 3B, RF, or DH, possibly no 2B. Granderson is probably a goner and good as he looked old (7 HR in 245 PA in 2013.) An old, near broken down, bad defensive SS who can’t play another position because he’s too egocentric and selfish to learn one and doesn’t have enough power to be a full-time or even primary DH making $12M after playing only 17 games in 2013 in which his best work was the homerun he hit on the very first pitch he saw. Soriano had another solid year but he’s 37 – was 2013 his last hurrah? A mid-30s 1B coming off a season lost by injuries. ONE guy you could say has little or no question marks about him in Gardner. Martin and Cabrera would’ve been nice on this team – too bad Cashman was blinded by Japanese tv ratings advertising dollars over the RIDICULOUS idea that re-signing Suzuki equalled him collecting his 3000th hit as a Yankee in late 2014 then panicked and took on $13.9M of Wells. BTW Suzuki needed 384 hits to reach 3,000 hits before 2015/contract – who the !@#$ thought he’d average 192 hits a year 2013-14 to get to 3,000 besides Cashman? Don’t tell me Cashman/the Yankees re-signed Suzuki for two years because he was still Suzuki through 2010. They wanted the chase for 3,000 hits dollars which are now gone and all they have left is an overpaid super fourth outfielder with no power afraid to go to the wall and steal a base. His 2012 with the Yanks was a mirage and should’ve been looked at as that, his last hurrah. You could say Soriano’s 2013 with the Yanks could be his last hurrah but Soriano was still an offensive force as late as 2012 (32 HR 108 RBI) and is costing only $5M, a bargain relative to Suzuki who is making $1.5M for if we’re lucky 5 HR vs. 25-33 HR Soriano should smack if healthy and typical.

    It’s scary when Gardner and Soriano are the only Yankees under contract you could honestly say are the only locks or near-locks in the starting nine to be productive. Again how nice it would’ve been to have Martin and Cabrera. Ya sign Carlos Beltran for DH and say Juan Uribe for 3B and that’s a nice starting nine of C-Martin, 1B-Teixiera, 2B-Cano or Infante, 3B-Uribe, SS-Jeter, LF-Soriano, CF-Gardner, RF-Cabrera, DH-Beltran. No need for Granderson or McCann. No need to trade for Hanigan.

    I will have to grin and bear Cashman for one more season. Cashman should be fired if the Yanks get off to a bad start after a third of a season. Anything less than .500 should be fireable. Let someone new with creativity make the deals to get them to 45-36 at the halfway point (provided Cashman doesn’t drive them too far below .500 after a third of a season.)


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