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A New York Yankees blog by Chad Jennings and the staff of The Journal News


Winter league notes: Almonte putting up big numbers

Posted by: Chad Jennings - Posted in Misc on Dec 26, 2013 Print This Post Print This Post | Email This Post Email This Post

The regular season is coming to an end in winter ball. The Yankees haven’t had a ton of significant names playing this winter, but there are a few you’ll recognize.

Zoilo Almonte• The Dominican Winter League regular season has ended, and it’s been a strong winter for Zoilo Almonte. Not sure that means much in his bid for a big league roster spot, but it can’t hurt. He had multiple hits in three of his last four games — and six of his past 10 — raising his winter slash line up to .316/.343/.454 while regularly batting third or fourth in the order. He’s had some time in center and right, but the vast majority of his playing time has come in left field. In keeping with his minor league splits, he’s had an .874 OPS against righties with a .663 against lefties. Winter numbers rarely mean a ton, but at the very least it’s a sign that Almonte is healthy and hitting with spring training two months away.

• Pretty interesting what’s happened with Adonis Garcia down in Venezuela. He’s been almost exclusively an outfielder with the Yankees — and he was playing almost entirely outfield early this winter — but for the past month or so, Garcia’s been playing second base and third base without a single turn in the outfield. He’s made six errors in that time, but he’s also hitting .319/.344/.491 (with a 17-game hitting streak that came to an end just before Christmas). Going to be interesting to see how the Yankees use him. It’s not like they can’t find at-bats for a right-handed outfielder, but the Yankees have always liked maximizing the versatility of young players.

• Speaking of right-handed outfielders who can play the infielder, Ronnier Mustelier has started hitting a little bit in Mexico. He was hitting .229/.350/.297 in early December, but in the past three months he’s raised that season slash line up to .279/.391/.374. Still not the kind of power you expect from Mustelier in winter ball, but he’s getting on base quite a bit, and he has 21 hits in his past 13 games. He’s primarily playing right field, with some time in left field, center field and at third base. He’s coming off a underwhelming season shortened by injuries.

• Only five winter games for Eduardo Nunez so far. Too small of a sample size for his numbers to mean much, but it’s somewhat interesting that he’s played both shortstop and third base.

Jose Pirela continues to rake in Venezuela. Not entirely sure what to make of it — my gut is to make not much of it — but he’s hitting .335/.421/.506 with multiple hits in nine of his past 13 games. He’s homered in two of his past three games. He’s getting most of his time in left field now, not so much second base, but those offensive numbers are pretty overwhelming. Again, not sure they put him on the big league radar, but they might deserve another look in big league camp.

• Relatively new minor league addition Antoan Richardson played in Venezuela until late November, hitting .254/.353/.336 while playing center field and right field. That’s more or less the same kind of hitter he’s been in the minors, with an on-base percentage that far exceeds his batting average. Could see a decent amount of time in center field for Scranton/Wilkes-Barre this season if Slade Heathcott isn’t there. Another new addition, third baseman Zelous Wheeler, is hitting .268/.359/.429 in Mexico.

• Very little winter league pitching worth mentioning. Aside from the four guys sent to the Arizona Fall League, the Yankees just don’t have many notable guys pitching this winter. Pat Venditte is healthy and pitching in Mexico and Jose Campos pitched one game in Venezuela, but the sample sizes are pretty small even by winter standards.

Associated Press photo

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80 Responses to “Winter league notes: Almonte putting up big numbers”

  1. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 6:16 pm

    Almonte and Baker would make one heck of a platoon.

    Zoilo crushes righties and Baker crushes lefties.

  2. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 6:22 pm

    JF–

    Follow up….

    I am having some difficulty locating the exact sites I read a few years ago about young pitchers who throw too many innings early, as I had the site on my Favorites tabm but that was several computers ago.

    I did find one of the articles that influenced my thinking, and it is an interesting read.

    http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/…..id=4359938

    A specific quote includes:
    “I’d like to know the average age of the rotations in baseball before 2000,” said Cardinals manager Tony La Russa. “It seems to me, back then, we had one guy in his 30s, a couple of guys in their prime at 29 to 31, and only one of the five in his early 20s. And those guys could all throw more than 100 pitches in a game. But now, it seems, we have three of the five in the rotation who are in their young 20s. [Former manager] Paul Richards once explained this to me, and it makes a ton of sense: As a young pitcher, the arm is growing. It is developing strength. It doesn’t have the musculature that it’s going to have in a few years. That’s how you develop arm and elbow strains, even core injuries, because a young body isn’t like a mature body, and it is just not as strong as it’s going to be.”

    La Russa added, “Young guys today rely on stuff. They throw 100 pitches; they don’t pitch 100 pitches. They are max effort on every pitch. And in the minor leagues, they’re doing whatever they can to get from Double-A to Triple-A, so the stress level is higher. They’re getting to the big leagues younger, there is maximum pressure to perform, and because of that, they are letting it fly. That’s how young pitchers develop arm injuries and fatigue. In the old days, pitchers spent time in D ball, C ball; they threw 500-600 innings, sometimes 700-800, on lower levels. There was no carrot out there like there is now to move up. Today’s young pitchers are firing 85-90 pitches, fatigue sets in, and the next 15-20 they throw, they’re still firing. A veteran at 70 pitches might have all kinds of stuff left. Clubs that have a lot of young pitchers are leery of pushing them because they know it’s smart not to push them because they are throwing, not pitching.”

    ————-
    I’ll continue to find the other article(s) that had more analysis on the link between young pitchers throwing too many innings and their subsequent breakdowns….but it may take a while.

  3. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 6:22 pm

    JF–

    Further follow-up…

    Here is a second article related to the arm injuries of youing pitchers.

    http://firebrandal.com/2006/03.....-pitchers/

    The interesting quote IMO here is:

    Glenn Fleisig, a doctor at the American Sports Medicine Institute, based in Alabama, takes it one step further. At ASMI, whose mission is to improve the awareness and treatment of sports-related injuries, Fleisig explains that injuries suffered by pitchers are due to quality of mechanics, amount of pitches thrown, types of pitches, physical conditioning and genetic make-up. He continues, saying that a pitcher cannot just deal with one of the causes of injury and ignore the others. “There are interactions between these issues,” he says.”

    Will Carroll, considered by many to be the injury expert in baseball and a writer on Baseball Prospectus, says that “pitching arm injuries are cumulatives. Ligaments and tendons break down and fray, labrums tear, muscles break down when not allowed to recover. It’s like driving a car too hard with bad maintenance.” Fleisig agrees, saying that most serious injuries come from the cumulatives, which, when he reviews surgical findings, always look ‘worn’. As coaches and instructors become more aware of what causes injuries, especially to young pitchers, more pitchers are finding themselves treated with kid gloves as their pitch counts have become limited.

  4. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 6:27 pm

    While the two posts above don;t tell the complete story that I recall about research on arm injuries among young players, it does paint the picture of how many young pitchers throw too hard before their arm strength fully matures, and coupled with developing mechanics and lack of finese, lead many young pitchers to gradually break down.

    The exceptions to this do exist. Players like Felix and CC may have been stronger than average at a young age, or had better mechanics, or knew how to pitch as opposed to hurling, but the articles point out numerous examples of young pitchers who crashed too soon in their career.

  5. Jerkface December 26th, 2013 at 6:32 pm

    I don’t think those articles are backing up your assertion that a pitcher that throws a lot pre 25 is going to burn out at 27. And again I am not seeing dozens of cases of this happening in the majors. If anything these articles are backing up Tanaka as a safer bet. These anecdotal quotes by baseball people are all about younger players being babied and then no wonder they break down, but Tanaka has trained to throw, go deep if needed, etc.

    And Tony La Russa’s take on rotations, I’m not sure he knew the make up of every rotation in the majors. Maybe he just remembered his own teams. Like just by way of fer instance, I went to 1990 and picked a random team, the Twins, and all their starters were 28 or younger. I do notice that La Russa’s team that year had no one under the age of 30 in the rotation, so me thinks its a little bias by Tony.

  6. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 6:33 pm

    Getting closer…

    From http://firebrandal.com/2006/03.....-pitchers/

    Prior to 1988, pitch counts were not kept as a statistic, so it took a while after 1988 to realize how important pitch counts were to maintaining the health of a pitcher. In 1989, Orel Hershiser, the defending Cy Young winner for the Los Angeles Dodgers, threw 170 pitches in one game. The next year, he blew his arm out. Also in 1989, 23-year old pitcher Al Leiter threw 174 pitches in a game and had arm injuries for the next three years, limiting him to only nine innings over eight games. This was two years after yet another heralded Yankees pitcher, Bob Tewsksbury, was throwing 97 mph and then blew his arm out. He topped out at 89 mph after the injury. Former director of baseball operations and interim general manager for the Cincinnati Reds’, Brad Kullman, says that there have been studies done which “found correlations between heavy workloads in years prior to turning 25 resulting in career-limiting or threatening injuries.” Leiter has since retired, bowing out after he participated in the inaugural World Baseball Classic. While he will be remembered as a solid pitcher, he could have been so much more, fans will always say.

  7. Jerkface December 26th, 2013 at 6:37 pm

    Sorry Bojo but I don’t really buy these articles. They cite the famous Mets busts and then say Atlanta must have been doing something right with Greg Maddux, but Maddux threw more innings than Tanaka did up to age 25. A lot of these things are luck of the draw.

  8. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 6:37 pm

    One thing that might help prevent injury is baseline strength testing for Pitchers.

    That way their relative arm strength can be scientifically monitored as the season progresses.

    I am also a believer in a thorough and well designed OS conditioning program like the ones at API.

  9. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 6:38 pm

    I don’t think those articles are backing up your assertion that a pitcher that throws a lot pre 25 is going to burn out at 27.
    ===
    27 is my rough recall estimate of the age…but can vary. The articles point to common causes that result in these injuries.

    Anyway, you are of course free to make your own conclusions. Mine is based on having seen too many cases like Bob Tewskbury, Gill Patterson, Al Leiter, Freddy Garcia and others have injuries that ruined extremely promising careers.

  10. Jerkface December 26th, 2013 at 6:39 pm

    Glavine and Maddux both threw more innings than Tanaka did before age 25. And they are cited as examples of handling pitchers responsibly. If you follow the pitcher abuse points thing, and the 30 inning jump thing, Tanaka passes all those tests.

  11. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 6:39 pm

    Jerkface December 26th, 2013 at 6:37 pm
    Sorry Bojo but I don’t really buy these articles.
    —-
    That;s fine. i respect your point of view and baseball knowledge, but I did want to follow up as promised and try to get the articles to you. If I do find the definitive study, I will post it. But that is all I can find for now.

  12. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 6:40 pm

    Tanaka’s mechanics are relatively clean and he is not a max. effort type of pitcher.

    His delivery is pretty classic drop and drive.

    He uses his whole body to deliver the baseball.

    That usually bodes well for durability.

  13. Pat M. December 26th, 2013 at 6:41 pm

    I tend to respect Hall of Fame Mgr. Tony LaRussa’s take of starting pitching, which by the way is shared by many of the old school guys still. I didn’t always care too much for Tony’s in game glorification by some in the media, but the guy knew the game and pitching. Afterall he had to have learned something after hanging out with his old catcher friend Dave Duncan. Jerkface or Tony L ????

  14. Jerkface December 26th, 2013 at 6:41 pm

    That’s pitching though, Bojo. All pitchers, no matter how they are handled, can be destroyed by injury. Thats why I believe theres no one way to develop or handle pitchers.

    I mean geez most of these studies throw out minor league innings because they consider them ‘low stress’ and Tanaka’s entire career is essentially minor league innings then!

  15. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 6:41 pm

    MTU December 26th, 2013 at 6:37 pm
    One thing that might help prevent injury is baseline strength testing for Pitchers.

    That way their relative arm strength can be scientifically monitored as the season progresses.

    I am also a believer in a thorough and well designed OS conditioning program like the ones at API.

    Yes,,,as a result of the money invested in these young arms, the research has increased and the techniques are getting better. There is still a ways to go.

  16. Jerkface December 26th, 2013 at 6:42 pm

    Afterall he had to have learned something after hanging out with his old catcher friend Dave Duncan.

    Do you think Tony La Russa learned the average age, make up, and health status of every rotation in the major leagues for each season for the past 20 years through Dave Duncan osmosis?

  17. blake December 26th, 2013 at 6:44 pm

    I don’t really know but I’m assuming Tanaka is a ground ball type guy with that split…..Kuroda is, and nova and CC are gonna have to be to be successful.

    Having stated that…..the yanks are making a big mistake IMO if they don’t address their infield defense…..their current rotation even if they add Tanaka isn’t gonna be a crazy strikeout group like Detroit trotted out there last year which allowed them to get but with bad defense…..it’s gonna be a problem unless they address it.

    Drew is the easiest way to address it

  18. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 6:45 pm

    Jerkface December 26th, 2013 at 6:41 pm
    That’s pitching though, Bojo. All pitchers, no matter how they are handled, can be destroyed by injury. Thats why I believe theres no one way to develop or handle pitchers.
    ====
    That sort of is my real point. I think long term contracts for pitchers are insane. They rarely IMO work out due to rate of injuries among pitchers.

    That is why one part of me is leary about going too long with Tanaka. Of coursem the other part says the team needs an ace to make it through play-offs, and where else will that ace come from since talent is rarely allowed to go to free agency as much as in past.

    So, I come down ever so slightly on the side that says sign Tanake, but realize you will probably overpay and be left with a pitcher who will have injuries in a few years that will make the later years of his contract a waste.

  19. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 6:47 pm

    Blake-

    Ryan is every bit as good w a glove as Drew.

    He may not hit as well but his D is just fine.

    I think they’ll add one more guy after Tanaka and A-Rod are decided.

    I doubt it will be Drew.

  20. Jerkface December 26th, 2013 at 6:49 pm

    Mine is based on having seen too many cases like Bob Tewskbury, Gill Patterson, Al Leiter, Freddy Garcia and others have injuries that ruined extremely promising careers.

    But how are these guys related to Tanaka specifically? Patterson didn’t even pitch at all in the majors. Leiter was hurt way before age 25 and ended up having a long career anyways. Garcia was never really great outside of 1 season so what exactly does he have to do with Tanaka? Tewksbury didn’t make the majors until age 25.

    I think its a rare bird that would be age 25-27 as a free agent, with out a lot of innings pitched, and also so good that a team would love to pay a ton to acquire them. And I’m not really seeing these examples you’re putting out line up with this specific case.

    you gotta throw a lot of innings to throw a lot of innings in your career, may as well get the guys that throw lots of innings.

  21. RadioKev December 26th, 2013 at 6:50 pm

    blake December 26th, 2013 at 6:44 pm
    I don’t really know but I’m assuming Tanaka is a ground ball type guy with that split…..Kuroda is, and nova and CC are gonna have to be to be successful.
    ———–

    Well Kuroda throws a sinker, Tanaka not so much it seems. His splitter looks more like a whiff pitch.

  22. blake December 26th, 2013 at 6:50 pm

    MTU,
    The difference though is that Drew isn’t a total zero with the bat

  23. Jerkface December 26th, 2013 at 6:51 pm

    That sort of is my real point. I think long term contracts for pitchers are insane. They rarely IMO work out due to rate of injuries among pitchers.

    Yea but unless you can consistently develop pitching its going to be very hard to build a strong rotation without giving some long term deals out. And the game is just moving towards long term deals. Luckily we root for a team with the cash money to absorb bad contracts.

    It’d be great if the Yankees could develop a pitcher worth anything, so they would not necessarily have to hand out long term deals to pitchers, but we’re not the cards or A’s.

  24. blake December 26th, 2013 at 6:52 pm

    Kuroda has a good 2 seamer but he throws a split too….

  25. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 6:52 pm

    Blake-

    You talked about infield defense.

    In that regard Ryan is every bit Drew’s equal or better.

    ;)

  26. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 6:53 pm

    erkface December 26th, 2013 at 6:49 pm

    But how are these guys related to Tanaka specifically?
    ====
    As always, an excellent question. You must be an analyst in some field.

    The answer is “I don’t know, as I didn’t see Tanaka pitch in Japan to have any idea if he has any red flags.” But it was more of a general worry based on the risk involved with the contract that will probably be required to acquire him.

  27. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 6:53 pm

    Mr. Splitty is well regarded in Japan.

  28. RadioKev December 26th, 2013 at 6:53 pm

    Eh, the whole innings thing is of mild concern, but far from a deal breaker. Who knows? I mean, 160 pitch outings that are scary, but if a pitcher shows no immediate affect from an intense outing, why worry long after?

  29. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 6:54 pm

    Bojo-

    Tanaka has a relatively clean injury history.

    nothing major at all.

  30. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 6:55 pm

    Japanese pitchers only go once per week.

  31. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 6:56 pm

    You want the sure thing.

    Trade for Bailey if he is available.

  32. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 6:58 pm

    JF–

    You know, it is interesting to see the way money has changed the game. I recall back in the late 90s, I would be in debates on the NYT Yankee blog saying that team budgets would soon blow past $100M, and many thought that was impossible. But now, it is not impossible for budgets to soon hit $300M in larger markets…so even giving out a large contract to Tanaka will probably have a good ROI even if based on only 2-3 years of top performance. He will help ratings here and in a probable joint marketing deal in Japan, he may help win a championship, and he will sell tons of marketable items.

    The game has changed and the financial end of it is totally different than even a few years ago.

  33. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 7:00 pm

    MTU December 26th, 2013 at 6:54 pm
    Bojo-

    Tanaka has a relatively clean injury history.

    nothing major at all.

    that;s the past….and as wear and tear is cumulative, it may not be indicative of future performance.

    I would rather sign Bailey next year…I think his agent takes him to market.

  34. blake December 26th, 2013 at 7:01 pm

    MTU,
    True but you don’t want Ryan playing every day cause he can’t hit a lick

  35. Jerkface December 26th, 2013 at 7:01 pm

    Baseball, and especially the way MLB has embraced the internet and advanced media, will continue to grow. They had record revenues the past 3 years. Lots more growth in this sport, and you’re right, its different even from 5 years or 10 years ago. If you think around 1995 there was relative parity under 100 million for most payrolls with BALTIMORE of all places equaling the Yankees. From then on revenues have increased, the Yankees revenues have quadrupled or more, while their payroll has only risen by around 1.5. The revenues in baseball have gone from 1 billion to 8 billion.

    And back to the pitching angle, we can look at Joba and Hughes as 2 examples of pitchers that fizzled due to injury ,but I wouldn’t let those bums stop me from signing Tanaka :x

  36. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 7:02 pm

    Bojo-

    It may not be but that is about all you have to go on.

    His mechanics are sound.

    You give him a thorough physical.

    Get some insurance and let him have at it.

  37. blake December 26th, 2013 at 7:02 pm

    Drew might hit 20 homers in YS…..

  38. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 7:05 pm

    BTW MTU–the same worries would apply to bailey. You spend a ton to get him, and he might break down at any time.

    The only real answer is to develop tons of young pitchers and just burn out their arms while under your team’s control, and then let them go. You won’t have as many superstars, but you will be ready to always compete…while maintaining the financial flexibility to invest in acquiring an occasional superstar. You go into those contracts knowing you will overpay,

    As it is, the Yankees have not done well enough developing pitching depth, so they have to rely on a staff of imports who may have their best days behind them.

  39. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 7:06 pm

    MTU December 26th, 2013 at 7:02 pm
    Bojo-

    It may not be but that is about all you have to go on.

    His mechanics are sound.

    You give him a thorough physical.

    Get some insurance and let him have at it.
    —–
    Agreed. They really have no other choice sonce their own system can’t seem to develop the pipeline they need.

  40. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 7:09 pm

    Bojo-

    The statute of limitations hasn’t run out.

    We have many, many arms in the pipeline.

    there’s no telling when one of them will live up to expectations, i.e. a Banuelos or a J-Ram, or any of the others behind them.

  41. Jerkface December 26th, 2013 at 7:11 pm

    there’s no telling when one of them will live up to expectations

    At this point I think the burden is on the Yankees to develop someone up to expectations rather than on the prospect to live up to it :)

  42. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 7:12 pm

    MTU December 26th, 2013 at 7:09 pm
    Bojo-

    The statute of limitations hasn’t run out.
    ==========
    Time will tell. I am not as optimistic about prospects as many here are. I don’t really take them seriously until after their first season.

    I do however like Nova a lot and was arguing to keep him last off-season when so many wanted to dump him.

  43. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 7:13 pm

    JF-

    Banuelos had TJS. J-ram has had arm issues.

    Hensley had hip surgery.

    Etc.

    We have a new MILB guy in Patterson.

    Let see what happens from here on out.

    There is a lot of talent to work w. They also have to stay healthy.

  44. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 7:13 pm

    Jerkface December 26th, 2013 at 7:11 pm
    there’s no telling when one of them will live up to expectations

    At this point I think the burden is on the Yankees to develop someone up to expectations rather than on the prospect to live up to it :)
    —-
    EXACTLY!

  45. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 7:15 pm

    “We have a new MILB guy in Patterson.”
    —–
    I remember Gil when he first came up….threw like 94-95–which was really impressive back then. Blew his arm out too and tried to come back as a lefty.

  46. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 7:15 pm

    The only reason the Yankees have Nova is because he was returned.

    They definitely did not see what he might become or he would have been protected.

  47. BoJo December 26th, 2013 at 7:16 pm

    See you later folks….been very enjoyable chatting with you all.

  48. chicken_stanley December 26th, 2013 at 7:16 pm

    True but you don’t want Ryan playing every day cause he can’t hit a lick

    ———

    The problem is you might not want Drew playing everyday either – against lefties there’s not a ton of difference between Drew and Ryan.

    I like Drew and think he’s the best option currently available but not sure he’s a slam dunk answer to all the Yankee infield questions

  49. blake December 26th, 2013 at 7:17 pm

    “The problem is you might not want Drew playing everyday either – against lefties there’s not a ton of difference between Drew and Ryan.”

    No but there is a lot of difference against righties and they pitch over 2/3 of the time.

  50. Pat M. December 26th, 2013 at 7:18 pm

    Face, I was agreeing with LaRussa’s perception on cultivating pitchers in the minors and building arm strength and enhanced durability. Tampa Bay incorporates that mentality to a great degree. As for Tanaka, he has good stuff and that can translate in the Bigs, but once again I see many here looking at him for being more than what he really is. His upside is that he’s young, he was suppose to be on the less expensive side and could be a real good # 3 starter. But if he starts to talk about 7 years at 20 million then much of that value declines in my mind

  51. blake December 26th, 2013 at 7:23 pm

    My guess is the yanks will look at tanaka as another investment in the Japanese market in addition to what he will do on the field…..if he’s as big over there as everyone says that’s a huge factor both for tanaka and the Yankees as each stands to make a lot of money off one another

  52. chicken_stanley December 26th, 2013 at 7:35 pm

    No but there is a lot of difference against righties and they pitch over 2/3 of the time.

    ——–

    Agreed. But in those roughly 50 games against lefties, you have Drew, Johnson, Roberts, and Ryan to pick from to fill 2 infield slots… none can hit lefties well – that’s a lot of games to have 2 dead spots in the lineup.

    i don’t know why I’m even arguing – I like Drew I just think acquiring him doesn’t answer all the infield needs – there would still be issues to be addressed.

  53. blake December 26th, 2013 at 7:39 pm

    Agreed. But in those roughly 50 games against lefties, you have Drew, Johnson, Roberts, and Ryan to pick from to fill 2 infield slots… none can hit lefties well – that’s a lot of games to have 2 dead spots in the lineup.”

    If sign Baker too….then you could play Jeter, Baker , Roberts, and Tex vs LHP

  54. pkyankfan69 December 26th, 2013 at 7:47 pm

    Buster Olney ranked his top offenses today.

    (1) Rangers
    (2) Red Sox (of couse)
    (3) Tigers
    (4) Cards
    (5) Angels
    (6) A’s
    (7) Indians
    (8) Rockies
    (9) Royals
    (10) Yanks

    Surprised we were lucky enough to grace his top 10

  55. blake December 26th, 2013 at 7:52 pm

    There aren’t 9 offenses better than the Yanks now IMO…..if they got Drew and Baker I’m not sure it’s not the best one in baseball top to bottom.

    Boston will miss Ellsbury ….I know they think Jackie Bradley mays will just step right in there but there was a lot of lightning in a bottle to the 2013 sox…..A LOT broke their way……and the Tigers offense is very much one guy these days as well

  56. blake December 26th, 2013 at 7:53 pm

    So moral of the story…..nothing new….Buster is an idiot

  57. DaSaint007 December 26th, 2013 at 7:59 pm

    Buster Olney’s ranking leaves lots to be desired, but top offenses don’t always win regardless. At least not on its own.

  58. blake December 26th, 2013 at 8:04 pm

    I don’t see the rangers as the best offense either….

  59. Triple Short of a Cycle December 26th, 2013 at 8:05 pm

    Wasn’t the Royals offense pretty bad last year?

  60. chicken_stanley December 26th, 2013 at 8:11 pm

    The batting stance guy does impersonationd of several baseball personalities, including Olney. Pretty amusing (Kurkjian especially)

    http://ftrsports.com/introduci.....-and-more/

  61. pkyankfan69 December 26th, 2013 at 8:11 pm

    Wasn’t the Royals offense pretty bad last year?
    —————-
    The Yanks’ pathetic offense scored 2 more runs than the Royals last year.

    A’s? Indians? Rockies? Royals?

    No Dodgers?

  62. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 8:13 pm

    Boston Red Sox AL 162 5651 853 1566 363 29 178 819 581 1308 123 19 .277 .349 .446 .795
    2 Detroit Tigers AL 162 5735 796 1625 292 23 176 767 531 1073 35 20 .283 .346 .434 .780
    3 Oakland Athletics AL 162 5521 767 1403 301 25 186 725 573 1178 74 28 .254 .327 .419 .745
    4 Baltimore Orioles AL 162 5620 745 1460 298 14 212 719 416 1125 79 29 .260 .313 .431 .744
    5 Los Angeles Angels AL 162 5588 733 1476 270 39 164 696 523 1221 82 34 .264 .329 .414 .743
    6 Colorado Rockies NL 162 5599 706 1511 283 36 159 673 427 1204 112 32 .270 .323 .418 .741
    7 Tampa Bay Rays AL 163 5538 700 1421 296 23 165 670 589 1171 73 38 .257 .329 .408 .737
    8 Cleveland Indians AL 162 5465 745 1391 290 23 171 711 562 1283 117 36 .255 .327 .410 .737
    9 Texas Rangers AL 163 5585 730 1465 262 23 176 691 462 1067 149 46 .262 .323 .412 .735
    10 St. Louis Cardinals

    Last year’s top 10

  63. pete2 December 26th, 2013 at 8:22 pm

    “There aren’t 9 offenses better than the Yanks now IMO…..if they got Drew and Baker I’m not sure it’s not the best one in baseball top to bottom.”

    Depends on how well you project Jeter, Kelly, Roberts and Tex to hit. If Tex and Jeter are close to 2012 form, you are right, if not, they are not even a top 10 offense.

    They should hit a few more HR’s if all goes well

    Ellsbury- 10-20
    Jeter-10
    Beltran -20-25
    Tex -30-35
    Soriano-25-30
    McCann-20-25
    Johnson-15-20
    Roberts-10
    Gardner-10

    Bench- 10??
    Projected 160-195
    Last year 144

    The big problem with this team offensively is the lack of depth. The bench as presently constructed is made up with guys who can’t hit much (Ichiro, Ryan, Cervelli, Nunez) and you would not want them playing for an extended stretch.

    It’s also rather susceptible to being shut down by LHP’ing.

  64. dan l December 26th, 2013 at 8:42 pm

    I don’t get why anyone wants Drew on the Yankees? He’s just not worth the cost for what he brings. Why not talk about signing Diaz come February 19th instead?

    As a Yankees fan sign Tanaka to a 5 year deal for around 110 million including the posting fee, sign Diaz the young Cuban SS and trade for either Brandon Kintzler or Steve Cishek for the pen and call it an off season.

  65. pkyankfan69 December 26th, 2013 at 8:45 pm

    5 years – $90M might be an OK opening bid for Tanaka but it will not get the job done, not even close.

  66. dan l December 26th, 2013 at 8:58 pm

    Tanaka is going to want to better the total Darvish got…5 years allows him to be a free agent again at 30, if teams go for 7 years there will be an opt out so what’s the point. Sign him to a fair deal.

  67. tomingeorgia December 26th, 2013 at 9:30 pm

    Yule fatigue has set in, Wanted to go to bed a hour ago, sitting up waiting for guests who were supposed to be here at 3 in the afternoon. C’mon, folks, amuse me!

  68. joeman December 26th, 2013 at 9:35 pm

    Cervelli was bad when he was jacked up on PEDS

  69. joeman December 26th, 2013 at 9:37 pm

    just got home from my last house visit…the pressure is off

  70. joeman December 26th, 2013 at 9:41 pm

    you can hit your way to a division but that’s as far as you’ll get without good pitching

  71. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 9:42 pm

    Keep your eyes on the prize Joeman.

    ;)

  72. joeman December 26th, 2013 at 9:48 pm

    MTU December 26th, 2013 at 9:42 pm
    Keep your eyes on the prize Joeman.

    ;)
    ——————————-
    I’m trying

  73. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 9:55 pm

    Close the circle Hal.

    Your almost there.

    :)

  74. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 9:57 pm

    sp: you’re. sorry.

  75. MTU December 26th, 2013 at 10:09 pm

    There’s a new one ———->

    I’m hitting the sack.

    See you all in the AM.

  76. Yankeeclipper December 27th, 2013 at 8:39 am

    Tanaka will go for more than $100M not counting the $20 M posting fee. He is truly a free agent vs. Darvish. Rangers had exclusive negotiating rights to Darvish after bidding $51.7 M as a posting fee so his 6/$56 M salary is not a true barometer of value.

    With Dodgers, Angels, Mariners, Cubs, Rangers, Red Sox and Yanks believed to be interested in Tanaka, I think Yanks will need to go 8/$160M to win. Mariners will go crazy on trying to land Tanaka and there is a more compelling reason – geographically and culturally – why he would sign with Mariners than there was for Cano to opt out of the Bronx for Starbucks country.

    Tanaka will get more than he is worth but that is the nature of this market. Tanaka will also drive up the value of Garza, Santana, & Jimenez who are next up after Tanaka sets the market. Tanaka will also drive up trade value for Smardija, and Bailey.

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