The LoHud Yankees Blog

A New York Yankees blog by Chad Jennings and the staff of The Journal News


Postgame notes: “I didn’t realize how nasty he was”07.29.15

Nick Goody

After scoring 21 runs for an improbable blowout victory, it seemed the onle thing all the Yankees wanted to talk about was the relatively unknown guy on the mound.

“It was amazing,” Chris Young said. “Diego is the guy tonight, though. To be able to come into the situation he came into, I don’t know how long he was in the game, but whatever it was, it was shutout pitching. I didn’t realize how nasty he was, so it’s nice to see that we have that in our arsenal as well.”

Diego MorenoDiego Moreno. Venezuelan right-handers. Twenty-eight years old. Nine years in professional baseball. Zero big league innings before this season. Five career minor league starts since 2009. Acquired in the A.J. Burnett salary dump three years ago.

Called up this morning, Moreno pitched 5.1 hitless innings of game-saving relief. He allowed one base runner, kept the Rangers from rediscovering their momentum, and saved the Yankees bullpen from what could have been a crushing situation. Adam Warren, who pitched immediately after him, said he had no idea how good Moreno’s stuff was this good.

According to Brooks Baseball, Moreno’s fastball averaged nearly 95 mph and topped out at 98. He also showed a power changeup and threw his slider for strikes. He wasn’t just eating innings. He was legitimately good.

“First, I was super happy about the opportunity given to me,” Moreno said through a translator. “Just to be able to be part of the win today, and they called me to be in the bullpen today, to help out, and I was happy that I could contribute to the win.

By this point, we all know how this works. There’s a solid chance Moreno will be optioned tomorrow to add a fresh arm (could be two new arms if Chris Capuano is designated for assignment). It’s just the nature of the business. Happened to Warren after a long relief appearance a few years ago. Happened to Chasen Shreve after he ate a bunch of innings earlier this season.

But regardless of what happens tomorrow, Moreno has left an impression. Twenty four hours ago, I wouldn’t have been stunned to see him DFA to open a roster spot for someone else, but this outing was impressive. As one Yankees player said: “No one in here will forget it.”

“Huge performance,” Joe Girardi said. “… The strikes he threw. Velocity. His changeup was outstanding. His slider was outstanding. He was ahead in the count, and he was able to expand. I think he had one walk, and it was the only base runner they had. He just attacked the zone. He went 5.1, and I think he only threw about 70 pitches. That’s aggressive.”

The Yankees were in a bad spot from the very beginning, but the offense exploded, and Moreno made an impression.

“I was thinking about it as soon as the (bullpen) phone rang,” he said. “I looked over and knew my number was going to get called.”

Chris Capuano• Girardi said the Yankees had not made any moves after the game. More specifically, he said the Yankees hadn’t made any moves “yet.” It would be surprising to see the Yankees not add at least one fresh pitcher tomorrow, maybe two.

• After walking five, getting just two outs, and putting the Yankees in a massive hole, is Capuano worried about his roster spot? “I try not to worry about that stuff,” he said. “That’s not my area. They’re going to try to do what they can to make the team better. As a player, you do the best you can, and you can live with that. For me, I’m just focused on not getting down, bouncing back, and being resilient like I’ve done throughout my career.”

• I don’t think anyone claims Capuano is a standout pitcher, but one thing to notice about tonight’s game: He couldn’t throw strikes. Capuano might not have overwhelming stuff, but he’s generally in the zone. He’d pitched just 4.1 innings in the past month, and rust seemed to be a significant factor in what happened tonight. He wasn’t hit hard, just couldn’t get the ball over the plate. “I have to be spot on with my pitches,” he said. “And tonight, I didn’t have it.”

• Adam Warren pitched three hitless innings of relief, which means he actually got a save tonight. That’s his first save of the year. The Yankees didn’t allow a hit after Shin-Soo Choo’s double in the first inning.

• According to the Rangers, Moreno is the first Major League pitcher with a relief win on 5.1-or-more hitless innings since the Rangers’ John Barfield in 1990.

• According to Elias, the Rangers are the second team in modern history (since 1900) to have two pitchers allow seven or more runs while getting three or fewer outs (both Martin Perez and Wandy Rodriguez did that tonight).

• With a grand slam and two doubles, Young finished the game with five RBI. “It didn’t suck,” Young said. “It felt good to be in that situation. Credit the rest of the guys; I had runners on base all night tonight. That’s the reality of it. You have runners on base all the time and you get hits every now and then, you’re rewarded for it. Kudos to the rest of the guys for being on base so much.”

Brett Gardner• Brendan Ryan managed two doubles in the second inning. On the first one, second baseman Rougned Odor broke toward second and the ball got past him the other way. Could have been a double play, instead it was a double. “I don’t want to speak on his behalf,” Ryan said. “But I have been crossed up where I’ve been anticipating one way and the hitter does technically what he’s not supposed to do on the pitch. Definitely, I’ll take it. I was fooled on it, but I still got the barrel to it.”

• Mark Teixeira was the only Yankees starter without a hit. He was hit by a pitch, but that wasn’t a problem. Girardi said he pulled Teixeira in the sixth inning just because the game was so lopsided. He wanted to give Teixeira a break.

• Rangers utility man Adam Rosales made his second pitching appearance of the season and gave up a home run to Brett Gardner (catcher Brian McCann immediately gave Gardner a hard time about it in the dugout). It was Gardner’s sixth time on base in the game, and it wasn’t entirely without merit. According to the TV broadcast, Rosales was actually getting his fastball up to 93 mph.

• The Yankees did not take batting practice today, and they won’t take BP tomorrow either. “I had a plan when we came in here because of the weather and we’re in a long stretch, that we’d probably take BP the first day and maybe not take it after that,” Girardi said. “Just here (in Texas) because of the long stretch and our guys seemed to respond pretty well.”

• Final word goes to Young, who was asked what it was like to score 21 unanswered runs: “That was sick. (Moreno) was the player tonight. He kept us in the dugout; we were never on defense too long. Stay fresh, stay within the rhythm of the game and continue to produce runs throughout the rest of the game. It was amazing.”

Associated Press photos

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Brett Gardner wins Yankees’ Heart and Hustle Award07.22.15

Brett Gardner

Here’s the announcement from the Players’ Association.

The Major League Baseball Players Alumni Association (MLBPAA) is pleased to announce Brett Gardner as the New York Yankees 2015 Heart and Hustle Award winner. This esteemed award honors active players who demonstrate a passion for the game of baseball and best embody the values, spirit and tradition of the game. The Heart and Hustle Award is also the only award in Major League Baseball that is voted on by former players.

“[Gardner] has moved into the leadoff spot in our lineup and has been the heartbeat of our offense,” said Alan Cockrell, Yankees assistant hitting coach. “He has moved from left field to center field and played Gold Glove defense. He has been a leader on the field and in the clubhouse.”

The MLBPAA formed 30 committees, comprised of Alumni players with established relationships to each team. One player from each Major League team is chosen by the committees based on their passion, desire and work ethic demonstrated both on and off the field. These players will be recognized prior to an upcoming home game. As the season draws to a close, fans, all Alumni and active players will vote to select the final winner from the 30 team winners. The previous overall winners are David Eckstein (2005), Craig Biggio (2006, 2007), Grady Sizemore (2008), Albert Pujols (2009), Roy Halladay (2010), Torii Hunter (2011), Mike Trout (2012), Dustin Pedroia (2013) and Josh Harrison (2014).

The final winner will be announced on November 10,2015 at the 16th Annual Legends for Youth Dinner in New York City. This event is the primary fundraiser for the series of free Legends for Youth Baseball Clinics. These clinics impact more than 15,000 children each year at 120 clinics, allowing them the unique opportunity to interact with and learn from players who have left a lasting impact on the game of baseball.

Associated Press photo

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Monday notes and links: Matsui pitching, Gardner’s shoes, Yankees’ targets07.20.15

Just a few notes and links from this final off day before the trade deadline:

Hideki Matsui• A fun story to check out at the end of an off day, Billy Witz from the New York Times wrote about Hideki Matsui moonlighting as a pitcher and right-handed cleanup hitter in a New York City adult rec league. “We’ve all followed him since our high school days,” one of the other players told Witz. “So whenever he comes to bat, everybody stops.”

• Jon Heyman writes that the Yankees have expressed interest in finding a starting pitcher, but they might not find one because of their unwillingness to trade Luis Severino, Aaron Judge, Greg Bird or Rob Refsnyder. Heyman says a right-handed reliever and right-handed hitter are also points of interest for the Yankees.

• Ken Rosenthal says the trade market for starting pitching could erupt as we get close to the trade deadline and teams decide whether to go all in on some of the impact arms available. Still doubt the Yankees make a play for one of these arms, but Rosenthal lists Johnny Cueto, Scott Kazmir, Cole Hamels, Jeff Samardzija, Yovani Gallardo and “even David Price” as big starters who could be available at the right price.

• If you missed it, it’s worth listening back to Michael Kay’s radio interview with Brian Cashman earlier today. There was not necessarily anything surprising about it, but he was on the air for about 20 minutes and talked through the Refsnyder demotion, the possibility of calling up Severino, and his approach to the trade deadline. Kay covered a lot of ground. Give it a listen.

• Last night Brett Gardner wore bright white cleats, which stood out as quite different from his teammates. Gardner told George King that CC Sabathia and others had been pushing him to wear the new shoes, but Cashman said during today’s radio interview that he actually talked to Gardner about sticking to the normal uniform going forward. “You’re not going to see those white spikes again,” Cashman said. “… That doesn’t look good, so we’ve fixed that. No big deal.”

• Before tonight’s Triple-A game, the Yankees activated shortstop Nick Noonan from the disabled list and immediately released him from his contract. The RailRiders have been playing Cole Figueroa at shortstop these days, and their infield has grown crowded with Gregorio Petit, Jose Pirela, Rob Refsnyder, Greg Bird and Kyle Roller.

• Speaking of the Triple-A team, Aaron Judge was held out of the lineup for the third day in a row. Cashman said earlier today that it’s a minor day-to-day issue. He sounded thoroughly unconcerned when I asked about it.

Associated Press photo

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Can Brett Gardner go from college walk-on to American League all-star?07.06.15

Brett Gardner

According to the FanGraphs version of WAR, Brett Gardner has been the eighth-most-valuable outfielder in the American League. That’s perhaps not surprising. What might be surprising is that all of Gardner’s value — according to that stat, anyway — has come from his bat. He’s actually lost points because of his defense.

Maybe Gardner’s not the high-end defender he sometimes appears to be — particularly in center field — but I have a hard time believing he’s really a negative with the glove. Regardless, the fact he ranks so highly on his bat alone really show just how good he’s been at the plate.

Gardner ranks third in the league in runs scored, fourth in stolen bases, fifth in doubles, 10th in on-base percentage, and he’s even 18th in slugging percentage ahead of Yoenis Cespedes, Chris Davis and Edwin Encarnacion. But will that be enough to make him a first-time all-star?

Here are the top American League outfielders ranked by FanGraphs WAR:

Mike Trout: 4.5 WAR, .299/.393/.575
Lorenzo Cain: 3.6 WAR, .305/.364/.462
Kevin Kiermaier: 3.1 WAR, .255/.289/.419
Jose Bautista: 3.1 WAR, .246/.397/.520
J.D. Martinez: 2.9 WAR, .285/.340/.563
Mookie Betts: 2.8 WAR, .283/.336/.463
George Springer: 2.6 WAR, .264/.365/.457
Brett Gardner: 2.6 WAR, .297/.373/.481
Alex Gordon: 2.5 WAR, .262/.380/.431
Yoenis Cespedes: 2.4 WAR, .292/.320/.479
Adam Jones: 2.3 WAR, .286/.334/.464
Kevin Pillar: 2.1 WAR, .283/.312/.412
Josh Reddick: 2.1 WAR, .288/.346/.463

Trout and Cain are already on the All-Star team, and the flood of Royals voting made Gordon questionable/bad choice for the third starting job.

Almost all of Kiermaier’s value comes from his defense, and I’m not sure that will be enough to put him on the roster (the Rays will surely be represented by Chris Archer, so Keirmaier won’t have to make it simple to give Tampa Bay a spot). Jones, on the other hand, isn’t having an elite season but might still finish top three on the players’ ballot because of who he is (and because his numbers have been excellent outside a bad month of May). Cespedes, also, could be a somewhat surprising players’ choice because his numbers were quite a bit better in mid-June.

Two things to consider about the possibility of Betts making the team: He has the sixth-best WAR in the entire American League according to Baseball Reference, and he could be the best way to get a Red Sox player on the team. If not him, then who? Maybe Xander Bogaerts? Clay Buchholz? Koji Uehara? Hanley Ramirez?

I’ve written before that I would pick Gardner, and I think he has a good chance of making it. But the outfield is always crowded, and Gordon being elected by the fans didn’t do Gardner any favors. I think Gardner deserves a spot, but much like Teixeira, that doesn’t mean he’ll actually get one.

Associated Press photo

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A blog post in which I vote for A-Rod to start in the All-Star Game07.02.15

Brett Gardner

You have until midnight tonight — well, technically 11:59 p.m. — to vote for the starters in this year’s All-Star Game. Unless you’re able to get about seven million friends to vote with you, I doubt you have much chance to seriously impact the Yankees’ status. Based on the latest voting update, the Yankees really have no chance of getting anyone into the starting lineup.

Just for the fun of it on an off day, here’s my ballot for each league. This isn’t an attempt to pick the most deserving or best player for each spot. This is voting the way I imagine a lot of people vote for something like this: some picks based entirely on merit, some based on personal favorites, some attempts to reward breakout performances, and some choices based strictly on players I’d like to see in this setting.

The actual All-Star starters will be announced on Sunday. Here’s my ballot, along with the leaders according to the most recent voting update:

Fielders AMERICAN LEAGUE

FIRST BASE
Current leader: Miguel Cabrera
My pick: Prince Fielder
The “right” choice here is Cabrera, but I love the story of Fielder’s return. Surely there’s a spot for him in the All-Star Game, and I’ll give him my vote. A lot of first basemen are worth a spot, which might crowd out Mark Teixeira despite his power and production.

SECOND BASE
Current leader: Omar Infante
My pick: Jason Kipnis
Clearly Infante is an absurd choice, and in the end he could be edged out by Jose Altuve (which would be fine, because Altuve’s fun to watch). But, man, Kipnis is having a great year. I’d love to vote for a guy like Brian Dozier, but Kipnis has been too good.

THIRD BASE
Current leader: Josh Donaldson
My pick: Josh Donaldson
I actually didn’t realize what a great year Manny Machado is having, but Donaldson is still the slightly better choice here. He’s now leading Mike Moustakas in the fan voting. Moustakas is having a nice season, but not on the level of Donaldson and Machado.

SHORTSTOP
Current leader: Alcides Escobar
My pick: Jose Iglesias
Combination of offensive production and defensive ability make Iglesias the right choice here. Kind of weird that Iglesias has so few RBI.

CATCHER
Current leader: Salvador Perez
My pick: Stephen Vogt
Granted, Vogt’s not nearly the defensive player that Perez or Russell Martin is — or Brian McCann for that matter — but Vogt’s been one of the best hitters in the league this season, and for that, I’ll give him a spot in my lineup. The best all-around choice is probably Martin. I wonder if Vogt being voted in by fans will crowd out McCann.

OUTFIELD
Current leaders: Mike Trout, Lorenzo Cain, Alex Gordon
My picks: Mike Trout, Lorenzo Cain, Brett Gardner
I’ve decided to support these crazy Kansas City fans by giving them one guy, and Cain’s been great. Trout is a no brainer. For my third outfield spot, I’m going with Gardner, who’s among the league leaders in WAR despite somehow getting negative points for his defense (according to the FanGraphs metric). What a great first half he’s had. Might even hit Gardner leadoff with Trout batting second.

DESIGNATED HITTER
Current leader: Nelson Cruz
My pick: Alex Rodriguez
If you want a “clean” ballot, DH isn’t the position for you. Maybe put Evan Gattis in there as a nod to the stunning Astros? As for me, I’m going with A-Rod just to see it happen. His return has been one of the great stories of the first half, so why not throw him in the lineup. The game doesn’t count anyway, right?

GoldschmidtNATIONAL LEAGUE

FIRST BASE
Current leader: Paul Goldschmidt
My pick: Paul Goldschmidt
Granted, I don’t know nearly as much about the National League as I know about the American League, but there’s no need to overthink this one, is there? Goldschmidt’s about as good as it gets at the plate.

SECOND BASE
Current leader: Dee Gordon
My pick: Dee Gordon
I like Gordon, and I like Joe Panik. Both are having really nice years, and I don’t think you could go wrong with either one (Kolton Wong deserves a mention here as well). Since it’s kind of a toss up in my mind, I’ll go with the hits leader who’s fun to watch play.

THIRD BASE
Current leader: Matt Carpenter
My pick: Todd Frazier
My St. Louis friends might disown me, but Frazier’s really becoming a superstar, and one who should be the face of an All-Star Game in Cincinnati. A lot of really good third basemen in the National League, but Frazier’s been the best of the bunch.

SHORTSTOP
Current leader: Jhonny Peralta
My pick: Brandon Crawford
Again, the St. Louis friends won’t like me, but I remember years ago being told by one of his former teammates that Crawford would eventually be one of the top players in baseball. He’s been one of those top players this year. That said, I nearly picked Troy Tulowitzki just because it’s Tulo and he’s awesome.

CATCHER
Current leader: Buster Posey
My pick: Yadier Molina
This is where I win back some of the Cardinals fans. Just a few weeks ago, I had a scout ask me who I’d want behind the plate for a Game 7. I said Yadi. The scout’s response was, “obviously,” as if no reasonable person would choose anyone else. Posey’s banging the ball all over the place, but Molina’s almost a legacy pick for me. I just think it’s hard to go wrong with him.

OUTFIELD
Current leaders: Bryce Harper, Giancarlo Stanton, Matt Holliday
My picks: Bryce Harper, Giancarlo Stanton, Andrew McCutchen
Joc Pederson’s going to make the team — and he’s going to make many more all-star teams after this — but I like the idea of the rookie coming off the bench his first time. That means giving the center field start to McCutchen, who happens to be one of my 5 to 10 favorite players in the game. I’ll vote for Pederson next year.

Associated Press photos

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Gardner left out as fans aren’t sold on Yankees in All-Star lineup06.30.15

Brett Gardner

These Yankees might be in the mix for the American League East, but apparently they’re not contenders in a fan-voted popularity contest.

Major League Baseball announced its latest All-Star voting totals on Monday, and no Yankees player ranked higher than fourth place at an individual position. Mark Teixeira (sixth in the league in home runs) isn’t even top five at first base, Brett Gardner (tied for the league lead in runs scored) isn’t top 15 in the outfield, and Brian McCann (fifth in RBI) is nearly 10 million votes out of the running at catcher.

Even Alex Rodriguez — with all of his positive press in his stunning return from suspension — has less than a quarter of the votes of Nelson Cruz, who was also wrapped up in Biogenesis and currently leads at designated hitter.

Royals Yankees Baseball“I’m sure the numbers are an accurate representation of the guys that the fans want to see in the games,” Gardner said. “If our fans haven’t voted as much as the other fans, than maybe there’s a good reason for that.”

Perhaps part of the problem for the Yankees is that their most deserving all-star just might be reliever Dellin Betances, and fans don’t vote for pitchers. Another problem could be that the Yankees’ most recognizable player is Rodriguez, who carries plenty of baggage that might lead fans to vote against him. They also no longer have their All-Star lock at shortstop.

“We don’t have the guys who have been there seven, eight, nine, 10 years,” manager Joe Girardi said. “That’ve been there a long time. You look at the guys with a lot of experience as a Yankee, and we have two or three really, and that’s it. We have Tex, Alex, and Gardy, and that’s about it. A lot of the other guys are new players who don’t necessarily have the history with the fans like some of the other guys who we had for a long time.”

It does seem to say something — though I’m not sure what — that no Yankees player has more total votes than Jacoby Ellsbury, who’s missed more than a month with an injury. It also says something that after Ellsbury, the Yankees’ outfielder with the most votes is Carlos Beltran, who’s definitely not having an all-star season.

Some fans, it seems, simply haven’t realized that the Yankees’ best position player so far just might be the unheralded former college walk-on who’s long carried the label of glorified fourth outfielder.

“I think (Gardner)’s become a complete player,” Girardi said. “He’s not just a leadoff hitter who plays good defense. He’s a guy who drives in runs, and does a lot of different things for your offense.”

According to the WAR statistic measured by FanGraphs, the Yankees have no one as productive as Gardner, who’s 2.5 WAR puts him in a tie with Yoenis Cespedes and Evan Longoria, ahead of Adam Jones and Albert Pujols. Fan voting still has Gardner — a homegrown player putting up good numbers for a wildly popular franchise — outside of the top 15 among outfielders.

“I think that if I’m one of the guys that deserves to go, then I’d like to be a part of it,” Gardner said. “If there’s other guys that deserve to go ahead of me, then I think they should go represent the American League. I haven’t looked at the numbers of other guys to see where the voting is at, so I don’t know. It’s out of my control. I just worry about what I can do, get my work in and go out there and play hard.”

Associated Press photos

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Postgame notes: Sabathia takes another loss, but Warren moves to the pen06.30.15

Yankees Angels Baseball

This was all pretty predictable. Another start when CC Sabathia wasn’t particularly good. Another postgame clubhouse when both Sabathia and Joe Girardi talked about seeing some positives in the outing. And finally the inevitable news that Adam Warren — and not Sabathia — will move into the Yankees’ bullpen.

“I thought (Sabathia) threw the ball pretty well tonight,” Girardi said. “I know it comes up as four runs in 7.1 innings, but I thought he threw the ball better tonight than he has recently.”

Although Girardi said pregame that the Yankees would stay on rotation, leaving Warren in line to start Wednesday’s series finale, Warren told The Daily News that he’s being moved into the bullpen. The move gives the Yankees what should be the right-handed reliever they’ve been looking for. It also takes care of some workload concerns for Warren, who’s already thrown more innings than in either of the past two seasons.

Yankees Angels BaseballBut it also takes away one of the Yankees’ most reliable starters, and leaves room for the guy with eight losses and a 5.59 ERA.

“Of course (the numbers are frustrating),” Sabathia said. “Not the ERA, but the fact that we’re not winning the games that I start. I just want to keep us in the game and try to get us some wins.”

We’ve certainly seen worse outings than this from Yankees’ pitchers this season, but with Sabathia, this four-run start continued a trend of games in which he’s been prone to costly mistakes at bad moments. Often it’s one big inning getting away from him. Tonight it was a few crucial pitches on a pair of home runs and on three two-out RBIs.

“I made some good pitches; I made some bad pitches,” Sabathia said. “It’s just part of it. But I’m battling and I feel like I’m getting better. … Just mixing fastballs in, two-seamer was pretty good tonight. Just got caught there with a couple cutters, and gave up two homers.”

Those were home runs No. 18 and 19 against Sabathia this season. He’s on pace to blow past his career-high for home runs allowed in a season.

“When he makes a mistake, they’re squaring it up,” Girardi said. “We’ve talked about how his command is really important for him. When he makes a mistake — it looked like he missed on the second home run, he was trying to go in and it was up and away — when you miss, you’re going to get hit.”

Sabathia’s been hit plenty this season, but he’ll start again when his turn comes around next week. Warren will be available in relief.

Yankees Angels Baseball• Watching this game with no connection to either team, I assume Mike Trout would have been the star of the show. Solo home run plus three running catches to take away extra-base hits. He twice robbed Chris Young, who smoked the ball twice and still came away with an 0-for-4. “You execute, do what you’re trying to do at the plate, but it’s a crazy game we play,” Young said. “Things like that happen. … Both of them (looked like hits), then you remember Trout is out there. He’s been known to make quite a few WebGems, and he made some good plays tonight. So you tip your cap to him.”

• Instead of literally tipping his cap, Young kind of waved his hand in a mock dismissive manner after the second Trout catch. “Just having a little fun,” Young said. “From a fellow outfielder, you can understand that’s what he’s supposed to do out there. He’s a great player, so just having a little fun.”

• The home run was Trout’s 20th of the season. He is now one of six American League players to ever have four 20-plus homer seasons before their age-24 season. The others: Alex Rodriguez, Ken Griffey Jr., Tony Conigliaro, Mickey Mantle and Ted Williams. “He was really the difference in the game,” Girardi said. “You can talk about, he’s responsible for about four or five runs in this game, taking three away from us, maybe four, and providing one himself. He was the real difference in the game.”

• This is also Trout’s second season with at least 20 homers before the All-Star break. The only other players to pull that off are Albert Pujols, Jose Canseco and Eddie Matthews.

• The last Trout catch robbed Chase Headley of possible extra bases. Headley seems to be hitting into a lot of that stuff lately. “Chase Headley I think has it worse than anybody this month,” Young said. “He’s been swinging the bat probably better than I’ve ever seen him swing the bat, and the numbers don’t always line up with what we consider success at the plate. It’s just a crazy game.”

Yankees Angels Baseball• The Yankees got their one run on an Alex Rodriguez RBI single, but they ultimately went 1-for-10 with runners in scoring position. Trout caused a lot of that, but still, one hit with 10 RISP opportunities is a problem. “(Trout)’s a difference maker out there it seems like every night,” Brett Gardner said. “He made some great plays out there obviously, swings the bat really well, but at the end of the day we just didn’t get enough runs.”

• Gardner actually went 3-for-5 with two doubles to continue his incredible hot streak — he’s hitting .511 in his past 10 games — but he was also a part of the RISP failure, flying to left in a key at-bat in the seventh. “He’s played extremely well,” Girardi said. “That’s why we locked him up, because we knew he was a really good player. He’s living up to everything.”

• Could be that Gardner’s make a case for the All-Star Game. He’s now tied with Yoenis Cespedes for first among A.L. outfielders with 25 multi-hit games.

• Sabathia only walked one guy and struck out five. Of his 95 pitches, 61 went for strikes, and he’s tied for third in the Majors with five road starts of at least seven innings pitched. He got deep into this game, but he left the Yankees in a hole.

• Angels starter C.J. Wilson cut his ERA to 3.78. “I think the defense behind him was outstanding,” Girardi said. “Maybe in our ballpark some of those balls are home runs. Headley might have two, Chris Young might have two. That’s probably the difference.”

• Final word goes to Young: “(Wilson) pitched well. He pitched well and the Angels played amazing defense. I think when you mix those things together, it makes for a good game. That’s not to say we didn’t swing the bats well. It think we swung the bats well, executed what we were trying to do, but pitching and defense wins games, and their defense did a great job tonight.”

Associated Press photos

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Postgame notes: “We’ll continue to work at it, and we’ll get him right”06.24.15

Phillies Yankees Baseball

The Yankees’ pitching staff just coughed up 11 runs for the third game in a row. It’s the first time the Yankees have done that since September of 2000, and they’ve done it with the guys who are supposed to be the top three starters in their rotation. First Masahiro Tanaka, then Michael Pineda, and tonight CC Sabathia.

Easy to dismiss the first two as simply bad games by good pitchers. But can the Yankees say the same about Sabathia?

Ivan Nova is coming off the disabled list tomorrow, which means someone is about to fall out of the rotation. Statistically, the worst starter of the bunch is the guy who used to be the staff ace just a few years ago. His 5.65 ERA suggests he’s not only lost that ace title, but he’s also become one of the worst regular starting pitchers in the big leagues.

Phillies Yankees BaseballBut Joe Girardi made it clear postgame that Sabathia’s going nowhere.

“He’s a starter for us,” Girardi said. “That’s what he is. That’s what we’re paying him to do, and that’s what he’s going to do.”

This start, though, felt all too familiar. It was yet another Sabathia outing when he pitched well for a while, got out of some trouble, but eventually crumbled under the weight of one big inning and a couple of big home runs. Little surprise that each of the Phillies’ homers was hit by a right-handed batter: Sabathia’s actually put up great numbers against lefties this season, but righties have an OPS well over .900 against him.

“I really don’t have an answer (for why righties have had so much success),” Sabathia said. “I feel like I’m just getting in some bad counts and these guys have been not missing. … It’s definitely frustrating. My stuff is there. I’ve just got to pitch smart. It’s not a case of my stuff being short or anything like that. It’s just: pitching smarter, pitching better.”

Sabathia said his knee hasn’t been bothering him at all. In fact, he said he feels healthy, and he thinks his stuff is good enough to get consistent outs. He got a couple of big strikeouts in the first inning and limited the damage against the heart of the order in the third, but that fourth inning was a mess.

Once again, the Yankees offense scored quite a few runs — enough runs to win on a lot of nights — but the pitching staff couldn’t do its part, and that started with Sabathia once again leaving the Yankees in a hole.

“I always feel good about CC when he’s out there,” Girardi said. “I’ve seen him do it too many times not to believe in him. It’s frustrating for him, but as I said, we’ll continue to work at it, and we’ll get him right.”

Six days from now, it will be Sabathia’s turn again.

“To try to turn this thing around,” Sabathia said of what’s next. “There’s a lot of season left, obviously. Like I said, I feel good about my stuff and my body, where I’m at. It’s just a matter of me going out and executing and putting a game plan together and pitching better.”

Phillies Yankees Baseball• It was Sabathia making the mistakes early. It was Betances making the mistakes late. After striking out the two batters he faced in the eighth inning, Betances simply wasn’t sharp in the ninth. “It’s just that ninth inning my pitches weren’t good,” he said. “Breaking ball wasn’t sharp, my fastball was off, I wasn’t commanding my fastball. It starts with the fastball and goes off that. I’m going after any hitter who I’m facing, and I’m going with my best stuff. It was just today, I didn’t have it in that ninth inning.”

• Betances had been charged with one run all season. Tonight he was charged with four and took his first career loss. He had been 9-0 to start his career, matching Whitey Ford for the longest winning streak by a Yankees pitcher to start his big league career.

• Betances had not pitched since last Wednesday, and Girardi said he was planning to get Betances in this game no matter what strictly because he’d gone so long between outings. “There’s no excuses,” Betances said. “I sucked today and they got the best of me today. … I threw bullpens in between, try to stay as sharp as I can. It was just one of those things. I was good the eighth inning, so I don’t think that was the (problem). It was just the ninth inning. I feel like I’ve got to be more aggressive and make better pitches. I wasn’t able to do that.”

• With starting pitchers struggling, the Yankees have been forced to lean heavily on their bullpen. Five different relievers got in this game. “I think (lack of rotation distance) is the reason you see so many changes in the bullpen,” Girardi said. “We’re shuffling people in and out and we’ve got to start getting some distance.”

• Phillies rookie Maikel Franco had his second straight five-RBI game. He’s now homered three times, doubled once and gone 6-for-8 in these first two games. “We just haven’t made good pitches,” Girardi said. “You look at the three-run homer he hit off CC, it was up and out over the plate. We’ve just got to make better pitches on him.”

• Here’s Betances when asked what he knew about Franco coming into this series: “Not too much. It doesn’t matter. You just have to make pitches whoever it is. He’s hot right now and the credit goes to him, but you face guys that have done it for a while like Miguel Cabrera, you go out there and try to make your best pitch. Today that wasn’t the case. He got the best of me. It was unfortunate we lost this game the way it happened.”

Phillies Yankees Baseball• The Yankees scored six runs, but they also blew some opportunities. The had a runner at third with less than two outs in both the sixth and the seventh innings and couldn’t cash in. “We had opportunities, and we didn’t get it done,” Girardi said. “And that’s frustrating too. Guys are, they’re fighting, they’re scoring runs, and they’re having good at-bats. We just didn’t get it done.”

• Brett Gardner remains red hot. He got on base five times last night, and got on base three times tonight. He also homered for the fourth time in six games. This is the sixth time in his career that Gardner’s homered in back-to-back games.

• Chase Headley’s been stone cold lately, but tonight he had two hits including the 100th home run of his career. The homer snapped a 105-at-bat homerless stretch. “It’s good to see him hit the ball out of the ballpark,” Girardi said. “I’m sure he’s going to hit plenty more. Hopefully he hits another 100 to 150 with us. It’s a big home run, and it means something, and we need him to continue to swing the bat.”

• Headley and Alex Rodriguez hit back-to-back homers in the fifth. It was the second time this season the Yankees went back to back (Stephen Drew and Headley did it back on April 12).

• Chasen Shreve has not allowed a run in his past 12 appearances, during which he’s thrown 13 innings with four hits, four walks and 12 strikeouts. Justin Wilson also hasn’t allowed a run in his past 12 outings, with his streak spanning 11.2 innings with five hits, five walks and eight strikeouts.

• Nick Rumbelow was the fourth Yankees pitcher to make his major league debut in the past three games. Rumbelow allowed a walk and a triple before striking out the last two batters he faced.

• Final word goes to Girardi: “It’s not enjoyable to watch, and it’s not enjoyable to be a part of it. The pitchers are doing everything they can to get people out. Right now we’re just not making pitches, and we’ve got to get better at it. Hopefully we can come out and get a good outing from Nova tomorrow, and you go from there. The last three days have been a struggle. It happens. It happens to teams, but it’s been a lot of runs.”

Associated Press photos

Posted by: Chad Jennings - Posted in Miscwith Comments Off

Postgame notes: “Didn’t really have much of a chance in his last at-bat”06.19.15

Alex Rodriguez

Hard to remember the last time Yankee Stadium got as loud as it did tonight. But there was no walk-off, no monumental home run. There was no milestone, and that was kind of the point. Those weren’t cheers that filled this stadium. They were chants and boos directed at a 27-year-old pitcher who seemed far more willing to hit Alex Rodriguez than give up a hit to him.

Alex Rodriguez“I was just trying to get him out,” Marlins reliever Sam Dyson said. “… If he was going to beat me, he was going to have to get the head out. I ended up throwing four balls kind of at his belt off the plate.”

Four straight pitches inside with Rodriguez one hit away from 3,000. The crowd was not happy about it. Never mind that the walk was part of a four-run inning that removed any doubt about who would win this game. The fans wanted to see history. They wanted to see A-Rod swing the bat. They were supporting Rodriguez as much as they were dismissing Dyson.

“I don’t even know how to describe it,” Rodriguez said. “It feels great. Every time moments like that happen, I can just reflect on a year ago today, (and) how great the fans have been to me. I think their support has actually helped me play a lot better.”

No one seemed to think Dyson was trying to hit Rodriguez (though at least a few of those pitches might have done it had Rodriguez not backed out of the box).

“He didn’t really have much of a chance in his last at-bat,” Joe Girardi said. “I think the crowd wanted to see it, I think that’s the bottom line, and I understand that. I’m sure the young man was trying to get him out, he just threw a bunch of sinkers that were too far inside, and Alex couldn’t even swing at them.”

So history will have to wait. Tomorrow the Yankees get Justin Verlander and the Tigers.

“I’ll think about it some,” Rodriguez said. “But I’m in a good place. Our team is playing well, we like playing at home, having the fans behind us was phenomenal today. My daughters are in town, Father’s Day is around the corner, I’m just really excited and having fun.”

C. C. Sabathia• Not a bad start by Sabathia, but not a great one either. It just kind of felt like a lot of Sabathia’s starts these days. Three runs across six innings is a 4.50 ERA, and if Sabathia could pitch like this every time out, I think the Yankees might take that. It was a winable start, and at times Sabathia looked great with seven strikeouts and no walks. “It’s difficult not, I guess, being the guy I used to be who went deep into games,” Sabathia said. “Just kind of is what it is. I go out there hard as I can until I’m done.”

• When did Sabathia come to grips with being that type of pitcher? “That’s something I came to grips with a couple of months ago; a couple of years ago,” he said. “It just kind of is what it is. Go out there and use my pitches and try to pitch deep into the game. … It really doesn’t change the way I pitch. It’s just frustrating for me that I can only give them six innings at a time.”

• After putting the side down in order the first three innings, Sabathia allowed one run apiece in the fourth, fifth and sixth innings. Just falling behind, he said. He got into bad counts, and the Marlins were able to chip away and take the lead for a while. “He did a good job,” Girardi said. “To limit them to three runs, a team that has really hit left-handers this season, I thought he did a really good job.”

• Chasen Shreve extended his scoreless streak to 11 innings over his past 10 games. He got his fourth win of the season. Each of his past 17 strikeouts have been swinging third strikes.

• Even though this had become a lopsided game, Girardi had Dellin Betances warming in the ninth. Girardi said he felt the Marlins were too close to being back in it to not have Betances at least getting ready just in case. “If I don’t bring him in and we lose the game, how’s that wear and tear? Girardi said. “Not too good. I’ll be crucified.”

Brian McCann, Carlos Beltran• Carlos Beltran’s game winner was the 30th home run of his career to tie a game or give his team a lead in the seventh inning or later. It was his second such home run with the Yankees. After a few good games in a row, Beltran is hitting .286/.348/.405 in the month of June. That’s after a good month of May. “The past couple of months I’ve been putting good at bats,” Beltran said. “It’s a long season, man. I know that it sounds cliché for me to say that, but I just have to approach each at-bat and every game as an individual.”

• After tonight’s game-tying shot, Brett Gardner’s hit 46 career homers, and 22 of those have tied a game or given the Yankees a lead. The Yankees have gone 34-11 in games when Gardner’s gone deep. “He’s been coming up huge for us the whole time,” Sabathia said.

• Mason Williams had two doubles tonight. Of his five big league hits, four have gone for extra bases. “I think he’s done a good job of making adjustments,” Girardi said. “It’s not easy being a young player, really hasn’t spent a lot of time in Triple-A. Not really knowing any of the pitchers that he’s facing. He’s made some nice little adjustments.”

• The Yankees are 9-1 in their past 10 home games. This was technically their sixth series sweep of the year, one away from their total from last year. … This was the fifth time Sabathia made a start without walking anyone this year. … Brian McCann has 20 RBI in his past 22 games. He had three hits tonight and I didn’t even notice until I saw the box score postgame.

• Still really weird to watch Carter Capps pitch with that little hop off the rubber. He must deliver the ball an extra foot closer to home plate, plus he’s able to reach 100 mph (which he did tonight). “When I saw Capps warming up,” Rodriguez said. “I told a bunch of my teammates in the dugout, ‘three-thousand is going to have to wait for another day.’ The chances of me even putting the ball in play are very little. Once I saw him walk out of the game, I was pretty excited.”

• Final word goes to Rodriguez about chasing No. 3,000: “It’s a lot easier to deal with these at-bats because we’re in the middle of a game and we need to win badly. It’s all about wins for us. The game was 5-3 and we’re doing everything in our power to keep the big guy out of the game. The focus is always winning.”

Associated Press photos

Posted by: Chad Jennings - Posted in Miscwith Comments Off

One year after Lindgren, Yankees looking to capitalize on high draft pick06.08.15

Royals Yankees Baseball

On the day he was drafted, Yankees reliever Jacob Lindgren was home in Mississippi. His girlfriend got into town that morning, and so he showed her around. A family friend invited some people over, and so there was barbecuing and swimming.

“It was nice and hot out,” Lindgren said.

It was June 5 of last year, and Lindgren knew he might be a high-round pick. When his name was called, he was the top selection of a Yankees team that hadn’t had much success with top picks. He was a college reliever built to move quickly, joining an organization notorious for advancing even its top prospects slowly.

Less than a year later, Lindgren was in the big leagues, tangible evidence that this might be a new era for the Yankees on draft day.

“A lot of guys that got drafted behind you, they’re like, oh, why did this guy get drafted ahead of me? Stuff like that,” Lindgren said. “There’s always that. Obviously you’ve just got to play good and show them why they drafted you high.”

The Yankees, too, have something to prove.

Aaron JudgeAfter two decades of far more failure than success, the Yankees enter tonight’s first round of the draft with the 16th overall selection, their highest pick since 1993. They have three of the top 57 selections, and they have something of a hot streak going. Focused heavily on college players like Lindgren, Aaron Judge and Eric Jagielo, the Yankees early picks the past two years have advanced quickly and shown significant promise.

Lindgren is already in the major league bullpen, Judge is considered the top hitting prospect in the system, and Jagielo has nine home runs in Double-A. Both Judge and Jagielo could be in Triple-A by the end of the summer, just two years after being drafted.

“I always heard (the Yankees) were slow moving their guys,” Lindgren said. “But I was going to do everything in my ability to make things happen.”

Lindgren pitched at four levels with 17.5 strikeouts per nine innings the year he was drafted. He pitched well in big league camp this spring, opened the season in Triple-A, and was called up on May 24, the first Yankees prospect since Deion Sanders in 1989 to reach the majors less than a year after being drafted.

It was a significant step for the Yankees, not only because they were willing to make the move, but because they had a top pick playing well enough to deserve the promotion.

Phil HughesWith a few exceptions — Phil Hughes in 2004, Ian Kennedy and Joba Chamberlain in 2006 — the Yankees’ top picks have mostly fallen flat since the overwhelming success of Derek Jeter taken sixth overall in 1992.

The Yankees took a high schooler named C.J. Henry during the otherwise talent-rich first round of 2005. They took a shot on injured basketball player Andrew Brackman with their top pick of 2007. They took a signability risk with Gerrit Cole in 2008. They gambled on high school shortstop Cito Culver in 2010 and have watched him hit well below .200 this season. In the decade before that, they picked forgotten names like Shea Morenz, David Walling and David Parrish.

What draft success the Yankees have had in recent years has been largely confined to the middle rounds: Brett Gardner in the third round of 2005; Adam Warren in the fourth round of 2009; Dellin Betances in the eighth round of 2006, the same year they got former closer David Robertson as a 17th-round steal.

Draft classes, though, tend to be defined by their top picks, and so Lindgren stands out as a success story, both for the player and the organization.

He had been a 12th-round pick of the Cubs out of high school, but Lindgren said Chicago didn’t offer him the signing bonus he wanted until the day before classes started at Mississippi State. Lindgren was already moved in, living on campus and ready to start college. He decided to stay and take his chances that pro ball would be waiting for him.

Jacob Lindgren“Early on, especially when you’re not getting the playing time you wanted, you’re like, man, what am I doing here?” Lindgren said. “But it worked out. It kind of taught me how you have to compete for any job you want. … There was a lot of hype and stuff (as a first-round pick), but I knew I had to come in and prove myself. I always tried to prove that I didn’t belong at each level and just tried to move up as fast as possible.”

It’s hard to move much faster than Lindgren has. He made his big league debut in the same year as the Yankees 2009 first-round pick, Slade Heathcott, whose development had been slowed by a series of injuries (he’s back on the disabled list now). The Yankees, though, seem to believe the arrival of Lindgren and Heathcott – plus the development of Judge, Jagielo, and former fifth rounders Rob Refsnyder and Greg Bird – are a sign that the team’s draft futility is turning around. They’ve especially struggled to find impact hitters, and suddenly the upper levels are crawling with both high-probability and high-ceiling bats.

“We do have an evolving system with some high-end position players,” general manager Brian Cashman said.

Tonight, the Yankees look to add to that stable of talent, trying to build off the recent success of their past two drafts, and trying to find someone capable of following Lindgren’s path to the big leagues.

“They probably just draft whoever’s the best available,” Lindgren said. “They’re just trying to bring good talent into the organization.”

Associated Press photos

Posted by: Chad Jennings - Posted in Miscwith Comments Off

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